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Features Archive


Showing stories 51-75 out of 486 stories.
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10-Feb-2017
Exploring mysteries on the surface
Ames Laboratory scientists Pat Thiel and Michael Tringides are explorers, discovering the unique properties of two-dimensional (2-D) materials and metals grown on graphene, graphite, and other carbon coated surfaces.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

6-Feb-2017
Fermilab achieves milestone beam power for neutrino experiments
The US Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has achieved a significant milestone for proton beam power. On Jan. 24, the laboratory's flagship particle accelerator delivered a 700-kilowatt proton beam over one hour at an energy of 120 billion electronvolts.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2017
Simulations reveal the invisible chaos of superluminous supernovae
To better understand the physical conditions that create superluminious supernova, astrophysicists are running 2-D simulations of these events using supercomputers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) developed CASTRO code.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

25-Jan-2017
Connecting the bytes
ORNL computer scientist focuses on maximizing utility of Titan.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

24-Jan-2017
The contradictory catalyst
One reason we can't bottle summer sunshine and save the solar energy for rainy days is that we don't have an efficient way to store it. Nature stores energy in chemical bonds, like when plants photosynthesize our food. Researchers are trying to design catalysts based on inexpensive metals to store energy like nature does.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jan-2017
Perfect powder: Ames Laboratory perfects metal powders for manufacturing
Ames Laboratory's high-pressure gas atomization process has garnered the laboratory at least 16 patents over the last two decades and created a spin-off company.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
lbmillsaps@gmail.com
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

12-Jan-2017
Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits
An international collaboration among physicists at the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, McGill University and the University of Konstanz recently demonstrated a new framework for faster control of a quantum bit -- the basic unit of information in yet-to-be created quantum computers -- in findings published online Nov. 28 in Nature Physics. Their experiments on a single electron in a diamond chip could create quantum devices less prone to errors when operated at high speeds.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

11-Jan-2017
Sketching out magnetism with electricity
In a proof-of-concept study published in Nature Physics, researchers drew magnetic squares in a nonmagnetic material with an electrified pen and then 'read' this magnetic doodle with X-rays.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Jan-2017
Brookhaven National Laboratory's top-10 science successes of 2016
From advances in accelerators and experiments exploring the building blocks of matter and making medical isotopes to new revelations about superconductors, nanomaterials, and biofuels, 2016 was a year of accomplishment at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Here are our Top-10 highlights.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

9-Jan-2017
Anything to declare?
Scientists at Fermilab and CERN considered several options to transport fragile components of the CMS detector to Geneva. Their answer? Buy seats for the components on commercial airline flights.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Jan-2017
CERN ramps up neutrino program
CERN is accelerating its neutrino program by participating for the first time in an experiment (the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab) not based at CERN itself.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jan-2017
New director named to lead US Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab
Jefferson Science Associates, LLC today announced that Stuart Henderson will become the new Director of the US Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. Currently serving as the Director of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project at DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, Henderson will assume his responsibilities at Jefferson Lab on April 3.

Contact: Greg D. Kubiak
kubiak@sura.org
202-408-2412
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

4-Jan-2017
SLAC study: Light can switch on topological materials
Theoretical physicists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used computer simulations to show how special light pulses could create robust channels where electricity flows without resistance in an atomically thin semiconductor.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Jan-2017
Theory provides roadmap in quest for quark soup 'critical point'
Thanks to a new development in nuclear physics theory, scientists exploring expanding fireballs that mimic the early universe have new signs to look for as they map out the transition from primordial plasma to matter as we know it.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

3-Jan-2017
Ceramic matrix composites take flight in LEAP jet engine
Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials are tough, lightweight and capable of withstanding temperatures 300-400 degrees F hotter than metal alloys can endure. A quarter-century ago, the US Department of Energy began a program, led by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to support US development of CMC materials. This year, LEAP, a new aircraft engine, became the first widely deployed CMC-containing product. CFM International, a 50/50 joint venture of Safran and GE, manufactures LEAP.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Dec-2016
For critical marine low clouds, a research and observation plan
Marine low clouds hover in the lowest couple of kilometers above the world's oceans. They produce little but drizzle, and could never match their deeper mid-continent cousin clouds for dramatic weather and severe storms. But marine low clouds are vastly important to the world's climate and energy balance.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

21-Dec-2016
Filling in the nuclear data gaps
Berkeley Lab's Nuclear Data Group is conducting new experiments to address common data needs in nuclear medicine, nuclear energy and fusion R&D, security, and counterproliferation work.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

21-Dec-2016
Honey, I shrunk the circuit
Sandia National Laboratories researchers have shown it's possible to make transistors and diodes from advanced semiconductor materials that could perform much better than silicon, the workhorse of the modern electronics world.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

20-Dec-2016
Scientists bear witness to birth of an ice cloud

Scientists have witnessed the birth of atmospheric ice clouds, creating ice cloud crystals in the laboratory and then taking images of the process through a microscope, essentially documenting the very first steps of cloud formation. The team took time-lapse movies of the first few seconds when a particle attracts water vapor, forming ice crystals that become the core of icy cirrus clouds - the high, wispy clouds that act much like a blanket for our planet.


Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2016
ARM/ASR veteran researchers win American Geophysical Union Ascent Awards
Susan van den Heever and Christian Jakob, two veteran Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR)-affiliated atmospheric scientists, have had their achievements recognized with Ascent Awards.

Contact: Hanna Goss
hanna.goss@pnnl.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Dec-2016
Data storage upgrades future-proof ARM field sites -- for now
Throughout 2016, Cory Stuart, ARM's Site Data System (SDS) and Cyber Security Manager, and his team at Argonne National Laboratory have been methodically visiting all ARM sites to upgrade the data systems, especially storage capacity.

Contact: Hanna Goss
hanna.goss@pnnl.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

13-Dec-2016
Capturing clouds for LASSO leads to new radar techniques
The ARM Climate Research Facility has some of the best instruments in the world for measuring atmospheric properties, but achieving the highest-quality results requires knowing the optimal way to use them.

Contact: Hanna Goss
hanna.goss@pnnl.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

21-Nov-2016
New tabletop technique probes outermost electrons of atoms deep inside solids
Researchers at the Stanford PULSE Institute have invented a new way to probe the valence electrons of atoms deep inside a crystalline solid.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Nov-2016
After the Nobel Prize, what do you do for an encore?
Brownian motion makes it difficult for scientists to examine single protein molecules. W.E. Moerner, who had previously won the Nobel prize in chemistry, started tackling this issue in 2004. He and his team developed the ABEL Trap, which allows researchers to corral single molecules for study. Since then, scientists have used the trap to study proteins involved in photosynthesis and other major biological systems.

Contact: Kristin Manke
Kristin.Manke@Science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

14-Nov-2016
Radiation security team from Sandia works behind the scenes at events to protect public
Richard Stump has been to five Super Bowls and hasn't seen a single pass, run or touchdown. Stump works security -- a very special kind of security -- at large public events. He's a senior scientist on Sandia National Laboratories' Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Showing stories 51-75 out of 486 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>


 

 

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