U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 270.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 12-Sep-2016
Nature Microbiology
Revving the microbial engine: Horsepower vs. fuel efficiency in bacterial genomes
Microbes that can reproduce rapidly in times of plenty have an evolutionary stockpile of extra genes that allows them to quickly respond to changing conditions such as oil spills or outbreaks of intestinal diseases.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
University of Michigan

Public Release: 7-Sep-2016
International Union of Crystallography Journal
Neutron crystallography aids in drug design
Knowledge of H-bonding networks, water molecule orientations and protonation states, along with details of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, can prove vital towards a better understanding of many biological processes, such as enzyme mechanisms and can help guide structure-based drug design.
Shull Fellowship, DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 5-Sep-2016
Nature Microbiology
New genus of bacteria found living inside hydraulic fracturing wells
Researchers analyzing the genomes of microorganisms living in shale oil and gas wells have found evidence of sustainable ecosystems taking hold there -- populated in part by a never-before-seen genus of bacteria they have dubbed 'Frackibacter.'
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Deep Carbon Observatory

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
Gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 5-Sep-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Warmer, wetter climate would impair California grasslands
Scientists from Rice University, Stanford University and the Carnegie Institution for Science said data from one of the world's longest-running climate-change experiments show that California grasslands will become less productive if the temperature or precipitation increases substantially above average conditions from the past 40 years.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Packard Foundation, Morgan Family Foundation, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Stanford University, Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 5-Sep-2016
Nature Plants
Study: Future drought will offset benefits of higher CO2 on soybean yields
An eight-year study of soybeans grown outdoors in a carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere like that expected by 2050 has yielded a new and worrisome finding: Higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations will boost plant growth under ideal growing conditions, but drought -- expected to worsen as the climate warms and rainfall patterns change -- will outweigh those benefits and cause yield losses much sooner than anticipated.
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, US Department of Energy, US Department of Agricuture, Agricultural Research Service

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 5-Sep-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Grassland tuned to present suffers in a warmer future
One of the longest-running, most comprehensive climate change experiments produced some surprises. Researchers subjected grassland ecosystems to sixteen possible future climates and measured ecosystem performance and sustainability. The study covered 17 years of plant growth, an important bellwether of ecosystem health. Plant growth varied tremendously from year to year; it peaked under conditions near the average over the last several decades. As conditions moved away from the averages, as happens with climate change, plant growth fell.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Packard Foundation, Morgan Family Foundation, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Stanford University and Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact: Chris Field
cfield@carnegiescience.edu
650-823-5326
Carnegie Institution for Science

Public Release: 1-Sep-2016
Structure
Findings about protein could open door to new class of antibiotics
Researchers have made the first-ever detailed, atomic-level images of a peroxiredoxin, which has revealed a peculiar characteristic of this protein that might form the foundation for an entirely new class of antibiotics.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Arden Perkins
perkina2@eou.edu
Oregon State University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2016
Nature Communications
Making the switch, this time with an insulator
Colorado State University physicists have demonstrated a new approach to low-power computer memory. Publishing in Nature Communications, they've demonstrated a new way to switch magnetic moments -- or direction of magnetization -- of electrons in a thin film of a barium ferrite, which is a magnetic insulator. Until this point, scientists have only demonstrated this switching behavior in metal thin films.
US Department of Energy, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Anne Ju Manning
anne.manning@colostate.edu
970-491-7099
Colorado State University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2016
Science
Chemistry method expedites path to useful molecules for medicine
A collaboration of Chinese and US chemists has laid out a highly efficient method to convert abundant organic molecules into new medicines. Teams led by the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry and the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe a way to convert carbon-hydrogen bonds into nitriles, common components of bioactive molecules used in medicinal and agricultural applications.
National Basic Research Program of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Shannon Stahl
stahl@chem.wisc.edu
608-265-6288
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 31-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Subatomic microscopy key to building new classes of materials
Researchers at Penn State and the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are pushing the limits of electron microscopy into the tens of picometer scale, a fraction of the size of a hydrogen atom.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Rutgers Center for Materials Theory

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 31-Aug-2016
Very Large Data Bases Conference
Proceedings of the VLDB Endowment
A data-cleaning tool for building better prediction models
New software developed by computer scientists at Columbia University and University of California at Berkeley analyzes a user's prediction model to decide which data to clean first, while updating the model as it works. With each pass, users see their model improve.
US Department of Homeland Security, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, DARPA

Contact: Kim Martineau
klm32@columbia.edu
646-717-0134
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 30-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Defend or grow? These plants do both
From natural ecosystems to farmers' fields, plants face a dilemma of energy use: outgrow and outcompete their neighbors for light, or defend themselves against insects and disease. But what if you could grow a plant that does both at the same time? A team of researchers at Michigan State University is the first to accomplish that feat, and the breakthrough could have fruitful implications for farmers trying to increase crop yields and feed the planet's growing population.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mark Kuykendall
mark.kuykendall@cabs.msu.edu
517-355-2282
Michigan State University

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
J.R. Macdonald Lab receives nearly $8 million DOE grant renewal
Kansas State University's James R. Macdonald Laboratory has received a nearly $8 million grant renewal from the US Department of Energy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jennifer Tidball
jtidball@k-state.edu
785-532-0847
Kansas State University

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change has less impact on drought than previously expected
As a multiyear drought grinds on in the Southwestern United States, many wonder about the impact of global climate change on more frequent and longer dry spells. As humans emit more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, how will water supply for people, farms, and forests be affected?
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@uci.edu
949-824-8249
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Plants' future water use affects long-term drought estimates
Studies have estimated that more than 70 percent of our planet will experience more drought under a quadrupling of CO2. But those studies ignore the fact that plants will use less water when carbon is more abundant.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
Volcanic eruption masked acceleration in sea level rise
The cataclysmic 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines masked the full impact of greenhouse gases on accelerating sea level rise, according to a new study.
National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
UTA physicists to upgrade Titan supercomputer software for extreme scale applications
Physicists at the University of Texas at Arlington have been awarded a new $1.06 million grant from the US Department of Energy to upgrade the software that runs on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility in Tennessee to support extremely data-heavy scientific applications such as advanced biology and materials science simulations.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Louisa Kellie
louisa.kellie@uta.edu
817-524-8926
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
New method developed for producing some metals
While trying to develop a new battery, MIT researchers find a whole new energy-efficient way to produce some metals without creating air pollution.
US Department of Energy, Advanced Research Projects-Energy, Total S.A., MIT Energy Initiative

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Green light: USU biochemists describe light-driven conversion of greenhouse gas to fuel
By way of a light-driven bacterium, Utah State University biochemists are a step closer to cleanly converting harmful carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion into usable fuels. Using the phototropic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris as a biocatalyst, the scientists generated methane from carbon dioxide in one enzymatic step.
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lance Seefeldt
lance.seefeldt@usu.edu
435-797-3964
Utah State University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study reveals new physics of how fluids flow in porous media
Detailed lab experiments from MIT and Oxford University provide fresh insight into the physics of fluid-fluid displacement in porous media, crucial to applications like carbon dioxide sequestration or fuel cell operation.
US Department of Energy, MIT Energy Initiative

Contact: Ms. Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials
Researchers have developed a novel approach to characterizing how atoms are arranged in materials, using Bayesian statistical methods to glean new insights into the structure of materials. The work should inform the development of new materials for use in a variety of applications.
National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Nature Physics
Light and matter merge in quantum coupling
Rice University physicists probe the boundaries of light-matter interactions as they bridge traditional condensed matter physics and cavity-based quantum optics.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin Corp. and W.M. Keck Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Nature Energy
Bubble-wrapped sponge creates steam using sunlight
How do you boil water? Eschewing the traditional kettle and flame, MIT engineers have invented a bubble-wrapped, sponge-like device that soaks up natural sunlight and heats water to boiling temperatures, generating steam through its pores. The design, which the researchers call a 'solar vapor generator,' requires no expensive mirrors or lenses to concentrate the sunlight, but instead relies on a combination of relatively low-tech materials to capture ambient sunlight and concentrate it as heat.
Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Solid-State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center, US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Aug-2016
Structure
Study shows how mutations disrupt ALS-linked protein
Structural biologists provide a new explanation for how ALS-associated genetic flaws interfere with the proper function and behavior of the protein TDP-43.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Soybean science blooms with supercomputers
Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB) project finds and shares comprehensive genetic and genomic soybean data through support of NSF-sponsored XSEDE high performance computing. SoyKB helps scientists improve soybean traits. XSEDE Stampede supercomputer 370,000 core hour allocation used in resequencing of over 1,000 soybean germplasm lines. XSEDE ECSS established Pegasus workflow that optimized SoyKB for supercomputers. SoyKB migrated workflow to XSEDE Wrangler data intensive supercomputer. Scientific cloud environment Jetstream of XSEDE broadened user base.
National Science Foundation, Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council, United Soybean Board, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jorge Salazar
jorge@tacc.utexas.edu
512-471-3980
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Showing releases 1-25 out of 270.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map