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NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 258.

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Public Release: 14-Aug-2018
Nature Climate Change
OU study shows effects of climate warming in tallgrass prairie ecosystem
A University of Oklahoma professor, Jizhong Zhou, and his team have completed a new study on the effects of climate warming on soil microbes in a long-term climate change experiment at a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. The new study shows that climate warming will affect microbial communities in the future, and future community states will be more predictable under warmed climate. Eventually, microbial communities will produce different functions and feedbacks to climate warming.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Genomic Science Program

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 13-Aug-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A computational method for designing a new type of 2D carbons
Scientists from EPFL and Berkeley have developed a computational method for designing a new type of two-dimensional carbon materials called Schwarzites.
US Department of Energy, ShanghaiTech University, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), NCCR MARVEL, European Research Council (ERC), EU graphene program

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 13-Aug-2018
Nature
In neutron stars, protons may do the heavy lifting
In neutron stars, protons may do the heavy lifting, according to MIT researchers. Their new study suggests that the positively charged particles may have an outsize influence on the properties of neutron stars and other neutron-rich objects.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Israel Science Foundation, Chilean Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Aug-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Long-sought carbon structure joins graphene, fullerene family
Scientists have been playing with pure carbon compounds for centuries, starting with diamond and graphite and now with fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene. One type of 3D geometry has been missing, however: a negatively curved carbon-cage surface called schwarzite. UC Berkeley chemists have now shown that serendipitously produced materials called zeolite-templated carbons are in fact the long-sought schwarzites. Their recipe for making schwarzites could make them practical in electronics and gas storage.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 9-Aug-2018
Nature
For UW physicists, the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride is full of surprises
In a paper published online July 23 in the journal Nature, a UW-led research team reports that the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride can undergo 'ferroelectric switching.' Materials with ferroelectric properties can have applications in memory storage, capacitors, RFID card technologies and even medical sensors -- and tungsten ditelluride is the first exfoliated 2-D material known to undergo ferroelectric switching.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 8-Aug-2018
American Economic Review
Environmental regulations drove steep declines in US factory pollution
A new study by UC Berkeley economists shows that between 1990 and 2008, air pollution levels plummeted. The evidence shows that environmental regulation and the associated cleanup of production processes played important roles in those steep declines. Manufacturers are producing the same types of goods, but they've taken significant steps to clean up their production processes, the authors say.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 7-Aug-2018
Nature Communications
Rice University physicists find surprising distortions in high-temperature superconductors
Rice University physicists used simulations and neutron scattering experiments to show the presence of tiny lattice distortions near the optimal superconductivity of an iron pnictide compound. Their work could help researcher design superconducting materials with novel and predictable properties.
US Department of Energy, Robert A. Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, National Science Foundation of China, National Key Research and Development Program of China, Shenzhen Science and Technology Program, Shaanxi International Cooperation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 3-Aug-2018
UW, PNNL to host energy research center focusing on bio-inspired design and assembly
The US Department of Energy has awarded an expected $10.75 million, four-year grant to the University of Washington, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and other partner institutions for a new interdisciplinary research center to define the enigmatic rules that govern how molecular-scale building blocks assemble into ordered structures and give rise to complex hierarchical materials.
US Department of Energy

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 2-Aug-2018
Science
'Strange metals' just got stranger
Scientists at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have discovered a behavior in materials called cuprates that suggests they carry current in a way entirely different from conventional metals such as copper. The research, published today in the journal Science, adds new meaning to the materials' moniker, 'strange metals.'
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Kristin Roberts
kroberts@magnet.fsu.edu
850-644-1933
Florida State University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2018
Nature Communications
Looking inside the lithium battery's black box
Columbia University researchers report the use of SRS microscopy, a technique widely used in biomedical studies, to explore the mechanism behind dendrite growth in lithium batteries, the first team of material scientists to directly observe ion transport in electrolytes. They were able to see not only why lithium dendrites form but also how to inhibit their growth. Visualizing ion movement could help improve the performance of electrochemical devices, from batteries to fuel cells to sensors.
Columbia University's Research Initiatives in Science & Engineering, Columbia University, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Holly Evarts
he2181@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 27-Jul-2018
Physical Review X
New algorithm could help find new physics
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed an algorithm that could provide meaningful answers to condensed matter physicists in their searches for novel and emergent properties in materials.
US Department of Energy Office of Science's SciDAC program, National Science Foundation, State of Illinois

Contact: Bryan Clark
bkclark@illinois.edu
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 25-Jul-2018
Nature Photonics
And then there was (more) light: Researchers boost performance quality of perovskites
In a paper published online this spring in the journal Nature Photonics, scientists at the University of Washington report that a prototype semiconductor thin-film has performed even better than today's best solar cell materials at emitting light.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, University of Washington, UW Clean Energy Institute, UW Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute, University of California - Berkeley

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Jul-2018
Feds back Rice U. study of nanoscale electrocatalysis
The US Department of Energy awards Rice University researchers $1.1 million to study single nanoparticles and their ability to act as electrocatalysts.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 25-Jul-2018
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Team shatters theoretical limit on bio-hydrogen production
A bacterium engineered at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln produced 46 percent more hydrogen per cell than a naturally occurring form of the same species. The team's highest reported yield -- 5.7 units of hydrogen for every unit of glucose fed to the bacterium -- easily surpassed the longstanding theoretical limit of 4 units.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Raghuveer Singh
raghuveer@huskers.unl.edu
352-214-9540
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 23-Jul-2018
IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing
Model fuses social media, remote sensing data with goal of identifying nuclear threats
A new computational model allows researchers to draw on normally incompatible data sets, such as satellite imagery and social media posts, to answer questions about what is happening in targeted locations. The researchers developed the model to serve as a tool for identifying violations of nuclear nonproliferation agreements.
DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2018
Environmental Science & Technology
Natural chromium sources threaten California groundwater
Natural sources of the toxic form of chromium appear in wells that provide drinking water to a large population in California, offering a new perspective on California's groundwater management challenges.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, US Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research through the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Program, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Contact: Danielle T. Tucker
dttucker@stanford.edu
650-497-9541
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2018
Science
Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern
An international team of scientists has discovered a new, exotic form of insulating material with a metallic surface that could enable more efficient electronics or even quantum computing. The researchers developed a new method for analyzing existing chemical compounds that relies on the mathematical properties like symmetry that govern the repeating patterns seen in everyday wallpaper.
Simons Foundation Nordita, European Research Council, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Packard Foundation, Schmidt Fund for Innovative Research, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Liz Fuller-Wright
lizfw@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 19-Jul-2018
Department of Energy invests $64 million in advanced nuclear technology
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced nearly $64 million in awards for advanced nuclear energy technology to DOE national laboratories, industry, and 39 U.S. universities in 29 states. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has been awarded $800,000 for analysis of nuclear power plants' accident propagation and mitigation processes.
US Department of Energy

Contact: News Media
newsmedia@rpi.edu
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 18-Jul-2018
Physical Review Applied
Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says
Your everyday permanent markers, glue sticks and packing tape may offer a surprisingly low-tech solution to a long-standing nuisance in the manufacturing industry: Making soft and ductile, or so-called 'gummy' metals easier to cut.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kayla Wiles
wiles5@purdue.edu
765-494-2432
Purdue University

Public Release: 18-Jul-2018
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Study finds climate determines shapes of river basins
Short and squat, or long and thin? An MIT study finds climate determines a river basin's shape.
DOE/Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Jul-2018
Nature Materials
In borophene, boundaries are no barrier
Defects are often observed when making borophene, the single-atom form of boron, but unlike in other two-dimensional materials, these mismatched lattices can assemble into ordered structures that preserve the material's metallic nature and electronic properties. Labs at Rice and Northwestern universities made the first detailed analysis of borophene defects.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Army Research Office, Robert Welch Foundation, DOE/Office of Science, State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2018
Nature Microbiology
Getting to know the microbes that drive climate change
A new understanding of the microbes and viruses in the thawing permafrost in Sweden may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change.
US Department of Energy, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Virginia Rich
Rich.270@osu.edu
614-247-1622
Ohio State University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2018
Nature
Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology
ASU professor Hao Yan and his colleagues have designed a range of nanostructures resembling marine diatoms -- tiny unicellular creatures. To achieve this, they borrow techniques used by naturally-occurring diatoms to deposit layers of silica -- the primary constituent in glass -- in order to grow their intricate shells. Using a technique known as DNA origami, the group designed nanoscale platforms of various shapes to which particles of silica, drawn by electrical charge, could stick.
National Science Foundation of China, National Key R&D Program of China, Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS, US National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Skip Derra
Skip.Derra@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 12-Jul-2018
Physical Review Letters
In search of dark matter
An international team of scientists that includes UC Riverside physicist Hai-Bo Yu has imposed conditions on how dark matter may interact with ordinary matter. In the search for direct detection of dark matter, the experimental focus has been on WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, the hypothetical particles thought to make up dark matter. But the research team invokes a different theory to challenge the WIMP paradigm: the self-interacting dark matter model, or SIDM.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 12-Jul-2018
Science
VERITAS supplies critical piece to neutrino discovery puzzle
The VERITAS array has confirmed the detection of high-energy gamma rays from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole located in a distant galaxy, TXS 0506+056. While these detections are relatively common for VERITAS, this black hole is potentially the first known astrophysical source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, a type of ghostly subatomic particle that can be made at astrophysical sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Smithsonian Institution, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Lisa Potter
Lisa.potter@utah.edu
949-533-7899
University of Utah

Showing releases 1-25 out of 258.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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