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NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 271.

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Public Release: 20-Apr-2018
Science
Grassland plants react unexpectedly to high levels of carbon dioxide
Plants are responding in unexpected ways to increased carbon dioxide in the air, according to a 20-year study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Thurston-Hamerski
susanth@umn.edu
612-626-5754
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 19-Apr-2018
USGS and DOE release nationwide wind turbine map and database
Today, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the American Wind Energy Association, released the United States Wind Turbine Database (USWTDB) and the USWTDB Viewer to access this new public dataset.
US Geological Survey, US Department of Energy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, American Wind Energy Association

Contact: Alex Demas
apdemas@usgs.gov
703-648-4421
US Geological Survey

Public Release: 19-Apr-2018
ACS Nano
Electrochemical tuning of single layer materials relies on defects
Perfection is not everything, according to an international team of researchers whose 2-D materials study shows that defects can enhance a material's physical, electrochemical, magnetic, energy and catalytic properties.
Natural Science Foundation of China, US Department of Energy, International Atomic Energy Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 19-Apr-2018
Neuron
Machine-learning system processes sounds like humans do
Using a machine-learning system known as a deep neural network, MIT researchers have created the first model that can replicate human performance on auditory tasks such as identifying a musical genre. This type of model can shed light on how the human brain may be performing the same tasks.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, DOE/Computational Science Graduate Fellowship, McDonnell Scholar Award

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Apr-2018
Nature
Salt boosts creation of 2-D materials
Salt simplifies the process of making novel two-dimensional materials. As reported in Nature, simulations by Rice University scientists show how labs in Singapore, China and Taiwan were able to make dozens of 2-D compounds, including many novel materials.
US Department of Energy, Singapore National Research Foundation, JST-ACCEL, JSPS KAKENHI, National Key Research and Development Program of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Ministry of Science and Technology of China

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
This 2-D nanosheet expands like a Grow Monster
Engineers discovered that tiny crystal lattices called 'self-assembling molecular nanosheets' expand when exposed to light. The advancement could form the backbone of new light-powered actuators, oscillators and other microscopic electronic components useful in the development of artificial muscles and other soft robotic systems.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 16-Apr-2018
Nature Photonics
Quantum shift shows itself in coupled light and matter
Researchers observe and measure a Bloch-Siegert shift in strongly coupled light and matter in a vacuum. The Rice University-led project could aid in the development of quantum computers.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, US Department of Energy, Japan Science and Technology Agency, and others

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2018
Seaweed-into-biofuel project gets Department of Energy support
A Colorado State University project to grow and harvest ocean macroalgae for biofuel production has received support from the Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. The project is led by Pacific Northwest National Lab Research Engineer Michael Huesemann and is initially being awarded $500,000 over the course of one year, but may be considered for further funding.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Anne Manning
anne.manning@colostate.edu
970-491-7099
Colorado State University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2018
Nature Materials
A higher-energy, safer and longer-lasting zinc battery
Again establishing the University of Maryland (UMD) as a leader in the development of groundbreaking battery technology, a team led by researchers at UMD's A. James Clark School of Engineering has created a water-based zinc battery that is simultaneously powerful, rechargeable, and intrinsically safe. A peer-reviewed paper based on the research was published April 16 in the high-impact journal Nature Materials.
US Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

Contact: Melissa L. Andreychek
mandreyc@umd.edu
301-405-0292
University of Maryland

Public Release: 16-Apr-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Engineering a plastic-eating enzyme
Scientists have engineered an enzyme which can digest some of our most commonly polluting plastics, providing a potential solution to one of the world's biggest environmental problems.
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory, University of Portsmouth, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Kate Daniell
kate.daniell@port.ac.uk
44-239-284-3743
University of Portsmouth

Public Release: 13-Apr-2018
Science Advances
Artificial intelligence accelerates discovery of metallic glass
Combining artificial intelligence with experimentation sped up the discovery of metallic glass by 200 times. The new material's glassy nature makes it stronger, lighter and more corrosion-resistant than today's best steel.
US Department of Energy, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Contact: Amanda Morris
amandamo@northwestern.edu
847-467-6790
Northwestern University

Public Release: 12-Apr-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Scaffolding' method allows biochemists to see proteins in remarkable detail
UCLA biochemists have achieved a major goal in biology: seeing at near atomic detail the smallest protein ever visualized by the technique whose development won the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry. Until now, this method has not worked with the small proteins inside cells.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 12-Apr-2018
Earth's Future
Algae-forestry, bioenergy mix could help make CO2 vanish from thin air
An unconventional mélange of algae, eucalyptus and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage appears to be a quirky ecological recipe. But, scientists from Cornell University, Duke University, and the University of Hawaii at Hilo have an idea that could use that recipe to help power and provide food protein to large regions of the world -- and simultaneously remove carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeff Tyson
jeff.tyson@cornell.edu
607-793-5769
Cornell University

Public Release: 12-Apr-2018
Science Advances
UNH researchers find combination for small data storage and tinier computers
It may sound like a futuristic device out of a spy novel, a computer the size of a pinhead, but according to new research from the University of New Hampshire, it might be a reality sooner than once thought. Researchers have discovered that using an easily made combination of materials might be the way to offer a more stable environment for smaller and safer data storage, ultimately leading to miniature computers.
DOE/Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Robbin Ray
robbin.ray@unh.edu
603-862-4864
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 10-Apr-2018
The ISME Journal
Scientists uncover details of viral infections that drive environmental, human health
New research from The Ohio State University offers a glimpse into the complexity of interactions between bacteria and the viruses -- or phages -- that infect them.
US Department of Energy, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Cristina Howard-Varona
Howard.1264@osu.edu
Ohio State University

Public Release: 10-Apr-2018
IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica
Looking into the past to find the solution for managing future demand
Researchers proposed that a top level design of an intelligent dispatch system could assist in this transition. By incorporating artificial systems to run computational experiments based on input from real-world systems, the algorithms could run scenarios and find the best way to dispatch power quickly and efficiently.
University of Denver, DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Science, State Grid Tianjin Electric Power Company China, Beihang University

Contact: Yan Ou
yan.ou@ia.ac.cn
86-108-254-4459
Chinese Association of Automation

Public Release: 6-Apr-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fluorescent dye could enable sharper biological imaging
A team of researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital has now taken a major step toward making short-wave infrared (SWIR) imaging widely available.
National Institutes of Health, Laser Biomedical Research Center, MIT/Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 6-Apr-2018
Science Advances
A different spin on superconductivity
A team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. While predicted to occur in other non-material systems, this type of behavior has remained elusive. The team's research, published in the April 6 issue of Science Advances, reveals effects that are profoundly different from anything that has been seen before with superconductivity.
Department of Energy, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, DOE/Office of Science, Microsoft Station Q, Laboratory for Physical Sciences-Condensed Matter Theory Center

Contact: Emily Edwards
eedwards@umd.edu
University of Maryland

Public Release: 4-Apr-2018
Environmental Science & Technology Letters
Trap, contain and convert
Injecting carbon dioxide deep underground into basalt flows holds promise as an abatement strategy. Now, new research by scientists at Washington University in St. Louis sheds light on exactly what happens underground during the process, illustrating precisely how effective the volcanic rock could be in trapping and converting CO2 emissions.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Erika Ebsworth-Goold
eebsworth-goold@wustl.edu
314-935-2914
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 4-Apr-2018
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
A new way to atomically thin materials
Metallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more expensive, titanium aluminum carbide, they selectively etch silicon out of titanium silicon carbide, a cheaper and more common precursor, to synthesize titanium carbide.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mario Mueller
angewandte@wiley-vch.de
Wiley

Public Release: 3-Apr-2018
Advanced Materials
Ancient paper art, kirigami, poised to improve smart clothing
In a study published April 2 in the journal Advanced Materials, a University at Buffalo-led research team describes how kirigami has inspired its efforts to build malleable electronic circuits. Their innovation -- creating tiny sheets of strong yet bendable electronic materials made of select polymers and nanowires -- could lead to improvements in smart clothing, electronic skin and other applications that require pliable circuitry.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 30-Mar-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Strings of electron-carrying proteins may hold the secret to 'electric bacteria'
Could a unique bacterium be nature's microscopic power plant? USC scientists who work with a species of bacteria that essentially 'breathe' rocks think it's possible.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Air Force Office of Scientific Research Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Jim Key
jameskey@usc.edu
213-821-2992
University of Southern California

Public Release: 30-Mar-2018
Science Advances
Bioinspired slick method improves water harvesting
By learning how water is collected by living organisms, including rice leaves and pitcher plants, scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas created and tested a combination of materials that can do the same thing, but faster.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
amanda.siegfried@utdallas.edu
972-883-4335
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 30-Mar-2018
Science Advances
Engineers turn plastic insulator into heat conductor
Is your laptop or phone overheating? New MIT-engineered plastic could lead to self-cooling casings for common electronics.
US Department of Energy, MIT Deshpande Center

Contact: Sara Remus
sremus@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Mar-2018
Energy Institute team awarded $1.2 million to study natural gas engine efficiency
A team of researchers from Colorado State University's Energy Institute has received a $1.2 million grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to look at making natural gas engines as efficient as diesel engines in the same class.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Anne Manning
anne.manning@colostate.edu
970-491-7099
Colorado State University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 271.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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