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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 445.

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Public Release: 16-Aug-2018
Plasma Sources Science and Technology
Protecting the power grid: Advanced plasma switch for more efficient transmission
Article describes PPPL research to help General Electric design an advanced and cost-effective power switch to protect the US electric grid.
Chinese Scholarship Council, DOE/Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Aug-2018
Advanced Materials
Most wear-resistant metal alloy in the world engineered at Sandia National Laboratories
Sandia's materials science team has engineered a platinum-gold alloy believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world. It's 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, making it the first alloy, or combination of metals, in the same class as diamond and sapphire, nature's most wear-resistant materials.

Contact: Troy Rummler
trummle@sandia.gov
505-284-1056
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 15-Aug-2018
Biological Conservation
Bird communities dwindle on New Mexico's Pajarito Plateau
Researchers have found declines in the number and diversity of bird populations at nine sites surveyed in northern New Mexico, where eight species vanished over time while others had considerably dropped.
Los Alamos' Environmental Stewardship Program funded the study.

Contact: Furhana Afrid
fafrid@lanl.gov
505-412-9200
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Aug-2018
Nature Communications
Light-emitting nanoparticles could provide a safer way to image living cells
A research team has demonstrated how light-emitting nanoparticles, developed at Berkeley Lab, can be used to see deep in living tissue. Researchers hope they can be made to attach to specific components of cells to serve in an advanced imaging system that can pinpoint even single cancer cells.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Aug-2018
Environmental Science and Technology
Algorithm provides early warning system for tracking groundwater contamination
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory have developed a low-cost method for real-time monitoring of pollutants using commonly available sensors.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Aug-2018
Nature
Protons get zippier in neutron-rich nuclei
A new study carried out at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has confirmed that increasing the number of neutrons as compared to protons in the atom's nucleus also increases the average momentum of its protons. The nuclear physics result, which has implications for the dynamics of neutron stars, has been published in the journal Nature.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Israel Science Foundation, Chilean Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 10-Aug-2018
Physics Review Letters
UT-ORNL team makes first particle accelerator beam measurement in six dimensions
The first full characterization measurement of an accelerator beam in six dimensions will advance the understanding and performance of current and planned accelerators around the world.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Aug-2018
Four Argonne transportation and fuel experts collect Dept. of Energy honors
Four researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have earned Distinguished Achievement awards for helping to reimagine transportation, sustainability and mobility.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, Fuel Cell Technologies Office

Contact: Chris Kramer
ckramer@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Aug-2018
SNS completes full neutron production cycle at record power level
The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has reached a new milestone by operating a complete neutron production run cycle at 1.3 megawatts. Achieving the record power level with a remarkable 94 percent accelerator beam availability establishes a new baseline of operation as well as a path to operate reliably at higher powers. Increased power offers researchers the ability to conduct faster scientific analyses using neutrons on more types of materials.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Aug-2018
Science
Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets
Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of this material changes in an unusual way under very high magnetic fields -- a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperature.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Aug-2018
Science Advances
Scientists squeeze nanocrystals in a liquid droplet into a solid-like state and back again
A team led by scientists at Berkeley Lab found a way to make a liquid-like state behave more like a solid, and then to reverse the process.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
GERoberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Aug-2018
Nature
Hotter temperatures extend growing season for peatland plants
A study published today in Nature revealed that turning up the heat accelerates spring greening in mature trees, shrubs and mosses and delays fall color change. The research team used direct observation and digital repeat photography to measure plant greenness over three years at the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Changing Environments study, a unique ecosystem-scale experiment constructed and operated by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Office; PhenoCam Network, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Askey
askeyka@ornl.gov
865-576-2841
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Aug-2018
INL wins two FLC Far West Regional Awards
Idaho National Laboratory has been honored with two Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Awards in 2018 in the Far West Region.

Contact: Leslie Wright
leslie.wright@inl.gov
208-526-2926
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Aug-2018
Workshop advances plans for coping with disruptions on ITER
Close-up look at workshop on mitigating disruptions in ITER, the international fusion experiment under construction in France to demonstrate the practicality of fusion power.
U.S. Department of Energy Fusion Energy Sciences

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Aug-2018
Argonne among 10 recipients of competitive grant for ultrafast science
Argonne has been awarded US Department of Energy funds to probe materials and chemical processes on time scales of a quadrillionth of a second or less.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Chris Kramer
ckramer@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2018
Nature Microbiology
Computer simulations predict the spread of HIV
In a recently published study in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory show that computer simulations can accurately predict the transmission of HIV across populations, which could aid in preventing the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Furhana Afrid
fafrid@lanl.gov
505-667-2871
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2018
Nature Communications
New Competition for MOFs: Scientists make stronger COFs
Hollow molecular structures known as COFs suffer from an inherent problem: It's difficult to keep a network of COFs connected in harsh chemical environments. Now, a team at the Berkeley Lab has used a chemical process discovered decades ago to make the linkages between COFs much more sturdy, and to give the COFs new characteristics that could expand their applications.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2018
Networks and Spatial Economics
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2018
These are ORNL story tips: residents' shared desire for water security benefits neighborhoods; 3D printed molds for concrete facades promise lower cost, production time; ORNL engineered the edges of structures in 2D crystals; chasing runaway electrons in fusion plasmas; new tools to understand US waterways and identify potential hydropower sites; and better materials for 3D printed permanent magnets could last longer, perform better.
US Department of Energy, DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2018
Nature Communications
Large supercrystals promise superior sensors
Supercrystals grown from tiny particles of gold have finer sensing capabilities than those commonly used to detect the chemicals in drugs or explosives.
DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Communication program

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 1-Aug-2018
Nature
As temperatures rise, Earth's soil is 'breathing' more heavily
The vast reservoir of carbon stored beneath our feet is entering Earth's atmosphere at an increasing rate, according to a new study in the journal Nature. Blame microbes: When they chew on decaying leaves and dead plants, they convert a storehouse of carbon into carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Jul-2018
Energy Policy
EV charging in cold temperatures could pose challenges for drivers
New research from Idaho National Laboratory suggests that electric vehicle drivers could face longer charging times when temperatures drop. The reason: cold temperatures impact the electrochemical reactions within the cell, and onboard battery management systems limit the charging rate to avoid damage to the battery.
US Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jul-2018
Idaho National Laboratory to lead new Energy Frontier Research Center
The Center for Thermal Energy Transport under Irradiation (TETI) led by INL will make it possible to accurately model and improve how heat moves through materials in extreme irradiation environments.

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jul-2018
Nature Communications
Unusual rare earth compound opens doorway to new class of functional materials
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered an earlier unknown discontinuous magnetoelastic transition in a rare-earth intermetallic. The mechanism of the material's changing magnetic state is so unusual, it provides new possibilities for discovery of similar materials.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jul-2018
Newest supercomputer to help develop fusion energy in international device
Scientists led by Stephen Jardin, principal research physicist and head of the Computational Plasma Physics Group at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), have won 40 million core hours of supercomputer time to simulate plasma disruptions that can halt fusion reactions and damage fusion facilities, so that scientists can learn how to stop them. The PPPL team will apply its findings to ITER, the international tokamak under construction in France to demonstrate the practicality of fusion energy.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2018
Statement by Jefferson Lab, Brookhaven Lab and the EIC users community on National Academy of Sciences electron-ion collider report
On July 24, 2018, a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committee issued a report of its findings and conclusions related to the science case for a future US-based Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) and the opportunities it would offer the worldwide nuclear physics community.
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, US Department of Energy

Contact: Lauren Hansen
lhansen@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Showing releases 1-25 out of 445.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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