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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 484.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 23-Mar-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods
Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)--which enables the visualization of viruses, proteins, and other biological structures at the molecular level--is a critical tool used to advance biochemical knowledge. Now Berkeley Lab researchers have extended cryo-EM's impact further by developing a new computational algorithm instrumental in constructing a 3-D atomic-scale model of bacteriophage P22 for the first time.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Mar-2017
Science
Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol
Results from experiments and computational modeling studies that definitively identify the 'active site' of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO2 will guide the design of improved catalysts for transforming this pollutant to useful chemicals.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2017
Astrophysical Journal
New study maps space dust in 3-D
A new Berkeley Lab-led study provides detailed 3-D views of space dust in the Milky Way, which could help us understand the properties of this dust and how it affects views of distant objects.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2017
Nature Physics
Ultrafast measurements explain quantum dot voltage drop
Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2017
New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster
The Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope can look for the complex patterns that indicate specific 'bad apples,' all while using less electricity than a standard 60-watt light bulb, due to its brain-inspired design.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 21-Mar-2017
Breaking the supermassive black hole speed limit
A new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.

Contact: Kevin Roark
knroark@lanl.gov
505-665-9202
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Journal of Geophysical Research
Less radiation in inner Van Allen belt than previously believed
The inner Van Allen belt has less radiation than previously believed, according to a recent study in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Observations from NASA's Van Allen probes show the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are actually much rarer and harder to find than scientists expected. This is good news for spacecraft that are orbiting in the region and can be damaged by high levels of radiation.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Scientific Reports
Testing for Zika virus: There's an app for that
Add rapid, mobile testing for Zika and other viruses to the list of things that smartphone technology is making possible. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a smartphone-controlled, battery-operated diagnostic device that weighs under a pound, costs as little as $100 and can detect Zika, dengue and chikungunya within 30 minutes.

Contact: Jules Bernstein
Jberns@sandia.gov
925-337-3229
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Nature
'Flying saucer' colloidal quantum dots produce brighter, better lasers
A multi-institutional team of researchers from Canada and the US has demonstrated steady state lasing with solution-processed nanoparticles called 'colloidal quantum dots,' an important step on the path to improving laser tools for fiber optics, video projectors and more accurate medical testing technology. The work is reported today in a paper for the journal Nature.
DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE/Office of Science, United States Department of Energy

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Physics of Plasmas
New feedback system could allow greater control over fusion plasma
A physicist has created a new system that will let scientists control the energy and rotation of plasma in real time in a doughnut-shaped machine known as a tokamak.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Power partners: Sandia draws industry into quest for cheaper, cleaner electricity
Sandia National Laboratories is working with three industry partners to commercialize a distributed power system that can produce cheaper, cleaner, more efficient electricity.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Mar-2017
The Plant Cell
Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants
Scientists from Brookhaven Lab have identified a previously unknown link between a protein that maintains plant sugar balance and one that turns on oil production. The biochemical detective work points to new strategies for tapping into the energy plants capture from the sun to produce oil-based biofuels and other biomaterials.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Mar-2017
Dan Sinars represents Sandia in first energy leadership class
Dan Sinars, a senior manager in Sandia National Laboratories' pulsed power center, which built and operates the Z facility, is the sole representative from a nuclear weapons lab in a Department of Energy leadership program that recently visited Sandia.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 10-Mar-2017
ORNL, HTS International Corporation to collaborate on manufacturing research
HTS International Corporation and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have signed an agreement to explore potential collaborations in advanced manufacturing research.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2017
Physical Review Letters
Discovery in new material raises questions about theoretical models of superconductivity
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has successfully created the first pure, single-crystal sample of a new iron arsenide superconductor, CaKFe4As4, and studies of this material have called into question some long-standing theoretical models of superconductivity.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Mar-2017
Science
Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance
In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating innovative 2-D layered hybrid perovskites that allow greater freedom in designing and fabricating efficient optoelectronic devices. Industrial and consumer applications could include low cost solar cells, LEDs, laser diodes, detectors, and other nano-optoelectronic devices.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Mar-2017
Journal of American Chemical Society
Unexpected oxidation state for molecular plutonium discovered
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with the University of California - Irvine (UCI) have uncovered a significant new chemical attribute of plutonium, the identification and structural verification of the +2 oxidation state in a molecular system.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Mar-2017
ACS Photonics
Guiding light: Sandia creates 3-D metasurfaces with optical possibilities
The new Sandia metamaterials can be fabricated in multiple layers to form complex, three-dimensional meta-atoms that reflect more light than shiny gold surfaces, usually considered the ultimate in infrared reflectivity. The III-V materials also emit photons when excited -- something that silicon, which can reflect, transmit and absorb -- can't do.
Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: nsinger
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 9-Mar-2017
New Phytologist
FRED database gathers root traits to advance understanding of below-ground plant ecology
Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists have released a new global, centralized database of plant root traits, or identifying characteristics, that can advance our understanding of how the hidden structure of plants below ground may interact with and relate to life above ground.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Stephanie G. Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Mar-2017
Science
Study: Soils could release much more carbon than expected as climate warms
Soils could release much more CO2 than expected into the atmosphere as the climate warms, according to new research by Berkeley Lab scientists. Their findings are based on a field experiment that, for the first time, explored what happens to organic carbon trapped in soil when all soil layers are warmed, which in this case extend to a depth of 100 centimeters.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Mar-2017
ACS Nano
Small nanoparticles have surprisingly big effects on polymer nanocomposites
Polymer nanocomposites mix particles billionths of a meter in diameter with polymers, which are long molecular chains. Often used to make injection-molded products, they are common in automobiles, fire retardants, packaging materials, drug-delivery systems, medical devices, coatings, adhesives, sensors, membranes and consumer goods. When a team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory tried to verify that shrinking the nanoparticle size would adversely affect the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites, they got a big surprise.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Mar-2017
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Argonne invents reusable sponge that soaks up oil
Scientists at Argonne have invented a new foam, called Oleo Sponge, that not only easily adsorbs spilled oil from water, but is also reusable and can pull dispersed oil from the entire water column -- not just the surface.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Coast Guard, Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

Contact: Alex Mitchell
amitchell@anl.gov
630-252-5573
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Mar-2017
Plants at the pump
Regular, unleaded or algae? That's a choice drivers could make at the pump one day. Toward that goal, Sandia National Laboratories is testing strains of algae for resistance to a host of predators and diseases, and learning to detect when an algae pond is about to crash.

Contact: Jules Bernstein
JBerns@sandia.gov
925-294-2612
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 7-Mar-2017
Scientific Reports
ORNL study examines tungsten in extreme environments to improve fusion materials
'We're trying to determine the fundamental behavior of plasma-facing materials with the goal of better understanding degradation mechanisms so we can engineer robust, new materials,' said materials scientist Chad Parish of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is senior author of a study in the journal Scientific Reports that explored degradation of tungsten under reactor-relevant conditions. Learning about how energetic atomic bombardment affects tungsten microscopically helps engineers improve nuclear materials.
DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Office of Nuclear Energy, DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Mar-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New materials could turn water into the fuel of the future
Scientists at Berkeley Lab and Caltech have -- in just two years -- nearly doubled the number of materials known to have potential for use in solar fuels. They did so by developing a process that promises to speed the discovery of commercially viable generation of solar fuels that could replace coal, oil, and other fossil fuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 484.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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