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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 452.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 22-Jan-2018
Nature Ecology & Evolution
Researchers reveal how microbes cope in phosphorus-deficient tropical soil
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has uncovered how certain soil microbes cope in a phosphorus-poor environment to survive in a tropical ecosystem. Their novel approach could be applied in other ecosystems to study various nutrient limitations and inform agriculture and terrestrial biosphere modeling.
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2018
Nature Materials
Scientists discover material ideal for smart photovoltaic windows
Researchers at Berkeley Lab discovered that a form of perovskite, one of the hottest materials in solar research currently due to its high conversion efficiency, works surprisingly well as a stable and photoactive semiconductor material that can be reversibly switched between a transparent state and a non-transparent state, without degrading its electronic properties.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2018
Advanced Materials
New fuel cell technology runs on solid carbon
Advancements in a fuel cell technology powered by solid carbon could make electricity generation from coal and biomass cleaner and more efficient, according to a paper published this week. Innovations in the anode, the electrolyte and the fuel allow the fuel cell to utilize more carbon, operate at lower temperatures and show higher maximum power densities than earlier direct carbon fuel cells (DCFCs). The results appear in this week's edition of Advanced Materials.
Battelle Energy Alliance

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2018
Nature Communications
On the rebound
New research from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Stanford University has found that palladium nanoparticles can repair atomic dislocations in their crystal structure, potentially leading to other advances in material science.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2018
Superconducting X-ray laser takes shape in Silicon Valley
An area known for high-tech gadgets and innovation will soon be home to an advanced superconducting X-ray laser that stretches 3 miles in length, built by a collaboration of national laboratories. On Jan. 19, the first section of the machine's new accelerator arrived by truck at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park after a cross-country journey that began in Batavia, Ill., at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jan-2018
Four to beam up
Just months after completing a nine-year construction project to upgrade its research capabilities, the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has delivered its next technological success: For the first time, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) has delivered electron beams simultaneously to all four experimental halls. This achievement maximizes the amount of research that can be accomplished during run times and paves the way for the next era of ground-breaking experiments at the lab.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 18-Jan-2018
Nature Communications
Let the good tubes roll
PNNL scientists have created new tiny tubes that could help with water purification and tissue engineering studies.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Science Foundation of China

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jan-2018
Nature Communications
Coupling experiments to theory to build a better battery
A Berkeley Lab-led team of researchers has reported that a new lithium-sulfur battery component allows a doubling in capacity compared to a conventional lithium-sulfur battery, even after more than 100 charge cycles.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
X-rays reveal 'handedness' in swirling electric vortices
Scientists used spiraling X-rays at Berkeley Lab to observe, for the first time, a property that gives left- or right-handedness to swirling electric patterns -- dubbed polar vortices -- in a layered material called a superlattice.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jan-2018
Science Advances
Surprising discovery could lead to better batteries
A collaboration led by scientists at Brookhaven has observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing. This discovery is a major step toward improving the battery life of consumer electronics
DOE Office of Science, Brookhaven's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, NSF, National Key R&D Program of China, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the University of Michigan Advanced Research Computing.

Contact: Stephanie Kossman
skossman@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
All in the family: Focused genomic comparisons
Aspergillus fungi are pathogens, decomposers, and important sources of biotechnologically-important enzymes. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by researchers at the Technical University of Denmark, the DOE Joint Genome Institute and the Joint BioEnergy Institute report the first outcome from the large-scale sequencing of 300+ Aspergillus species. These findings are a proof of concept of novel methods to functionally annotate genomes to more quickly identify genes of interest.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
mlballon@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 11-Jan-2018
Science
Breaking bad metals with neutrons
By combining the latest developments in neutron scattering and theory, researchers are close to predicting phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism in strongly correlated electron systems. It is likely that the next advances in superconductivity and magnetism will come from such systems, but they might also be used in completely new ways such as quantum computing.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jan-2018
231st Meeting of the American Astronomical Society
Dark energy survey publicly releases first three years of data
At a special session held during the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, D.C., scientists on the Dark Energy Survey (DES) announced today the public release of their first three years of data. This first major release of data from the Survey includes information on about 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies billions of light-years away as well as stars in our own galaxy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jan-2018
ORNL researchers use Titan to accelerate design, training of deep learning networks
For deep learning to be effective, existing neural networks to be modified, or novel networks designed and then 'trained' so that they know precisely what to look for and can produce valid results. This is a time-consuming and difficult task, but one that a team of ORNL researchers recently demonstrated can be dramatically expedited with a capable computing system.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Scott Jones
jonesg@ornl.gov
865-241-6491
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jan-2018
Science Advances
Ingredients for life revealed in meteorites that fell to Earth
A detailed study of blue salt crystals found in two meteorites that crashed to Earth -- which included X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab found that they contain both liquid water and a mix of complex organic compounds including hydrocarbons and amino acids.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
Multi-model effort highlights progress, future needs in renewable energy modeling
Models of the US electricity sector are relied upon by sector stakeholders and decision makers, but the recent surge in variable renewable energy (VRE), such as wind and solar, led a team of modeling experts to examine how these models would represent scenarios with high penetrations of VRE.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
NREL launches electrification futures study series
The US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is spearheading the Electrification Futures Study, a research collaboration to explore the impacts of widespread electrification in all US economic sectors -- commercial and residential buildings, transportation, and industry.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Physical Review Letters
Surprising result shocks scientists studying spin
Scientists analyzing results of spinning protons striking different sized atomic nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) found an odd directional preference in the production of neutrons that switches sides as the size of the nuclei increases. The results offer new insight into the mechanisms affecting particle production in these collisions.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2018
Nature Communications
Real world native biocrusts: Microbial metabolism
Specific compounds are transformed by and strongly associated with specific bacteria in native biological soil crust (biocrust) using a suite of tools called 'exometabolomics.' Understanding how microbial communities in biocrusts adapt to harsh environments could shed light on the roles of soil microbes in the global carbon cycle.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jan-2018
Macromolecules
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2018
ORNL story tips, Jan. 2018: study identifies microbes to diagnose endometriosis without surgery; brain-inspired device can quickly classify data; neutrons 'see' how water flows through fractured rock; new method could help with demand for electric vehicle charging stations; bio-based, shape-memory material could replace today's conductors; novel approach for studying material's magnetic behavior could boost quantum computing.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Bioenergy Technologies Office, DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jan-2018
Pioneering smart grid technology solves decades old problematic power grid phenomenon
Sandia National Laboratories and Montana Tech University have demonstrated an R&D 100 award-winning control system that smooths out inter-area oscillations using new smart grid technology in the western power grid. The new system allows utilities to push more electricity through transmission lines, leading to lower costs for utilities and consumers and greater stability for the grid.
US Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration

Contact: Kristen Meub
klmeub@sandia.gov
505-845-7215
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 2-Jan-2018
Nature Photonics
Tweaking quantum dots powers-up double-pane solar windows
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboraotry are creating double-pane solar windows that generate electricity with greater efficiency and also create shading and insulation. It's all made possible by a new window architecture which utilizes two different layers of low-cost quantum dots tuned to absorb different parts of the solar spectrum. The approach complements existing photovoltaic technology by adding high-efficiency sunlight collectors to existing solar panels or integrating them as semitransparent windows into a building's architecture.
Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, Energy Frontier Research Centre, US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2017
Science Advances
New study visualizes motion of water molecules, promises new wave of electronic devices
A novel approach to studying the viscosity of water has revealed new insights about the behavior of water molecules and may open pathways for liquid-based electronics. Oak Ridge National Laboratory used a high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering technique to measure the strong bond involving a hydrogen atom sandwiched between two oxygen atoms. This hydrogen bond is a quantum-mechanical phenomenon responsible for various properties of water, including viscosity, which determines a liquid's resistance to flow or to change shape.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Dec-2017
Nature Communications
A catalytic balancing act
Scientists have recently used a new and counterintuitive approach to create a better catalyst that supports one of the reactions involved in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. By first creating an alloy of two of the densest naturally occurring elements and then removing one, the scientists reshaped the remaining material's structure so that it better balanced three important factors: activity, stability and conductivity.
DOE/Office of Science, National Research Foundation, Nanoconvergence Foundation, Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Dec-2017
Royal Society Interface
Ames Lab-led team maps magnetic fields of nano-objects in liquid
A research team led by a scientist from the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has demonstrated for the first time that the magnetic fields of bacterial cells and magnetic nano-objects in liquid can be studied at high resolution using electron microscopy.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 452.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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