U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 457.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 26-May-2017
Nature Microbiology
Fungal enzymes team up to more efficiently break down cellulose
Cost-effectively breaking down bioenergy crops into sugars that can then be converted into fuel is a barrier to commercially producing sustainable biofuels. Bioenergy researchers are looking to fungi for help; collectively, they can break down almost any substance on earth, including plant biomass. Enabled by US Department of Energy Office of Science User Facilities, a team reports for the first time that early lineages of fungi can form enzyme complexes capable of degrading plant biomass.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 25-May-2017
Chemical Communications
Argonne scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation
In a new study, Argonne chemist Max Delferro boosted and analyzed the unprecedented catalytic activity of an element called vanadium for hydrogenation -- a reaction that is used for making everything from vegetable oils to petrochemical products to vitamins.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-May-2017
PLOS Biology
Neutrons provide the first nanoscale look at a living cell membrane
A research team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed the first-ever direct nanoscale examination of a living cell membrane. In doing so, it also resolved a long-standing debate by identifying tiny groupings of lipid molecules that are likely key to the cell's functioning.
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-May-2017
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
How X-rays helped to solve mystery of floating rocks
Experiments at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source have helped scientists to solve a mystery of why some rocks can float for years in the ocean, traveling thousands of miles before sinking.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-May-2017
Science
Special X-ray technique allows scientists to see 3-D deformations
In a new study published last Friday in Science, researchers at Argonne used an X-ray scattering technique called Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to reconstruct in 3-D the size and shape of grain defects. These defects create imperfections in the lattice of atoms inside a grain that can give rise to interesting material properties and effects.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-May-2017
Fusion Engineering and Design
Physicists discover that lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance
A team of physicists has discovered that a coating of lithium oxide on the inside of fusion machines known as tokamaks absorbs as much deuterium as pure lithium does.
Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
Biochemistry
Insight into enzyme's 3-D structure could cut biofuel costs
Using neutron crystallography, a Los Alamos research team has mapped the three-dimensional structure of a protein that breaks down polysaccharides, such as the fibrous cellulose of grasses and woody plants, a finding that could help bring down the cost of creating biofuels.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
ORNL welcomes Innovation Crossroads entrepreneurial research fellows
Oak Ridge National Laboratory today welcomed the first cohort of innovators to join Innovation Crossroads, the Southeast region's first entrepreneurial research and development program based at a US Department of Energy national laboratory.

Contact: Stephanie G. Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
Physical Review Letters
Scientists perform first-principles simulation of transition of plasma edge to H-mode
PPPL physicists have simulated the spontaneous transition of turbulence at the edge of a fusion plasma to the high-confinement mode that sustains fusion reactions. The research was achieved with the extreme-scale plasma turbulence code XGC developed at PPPL in collaboration with a nationwide team.
US Department of Energy (Fusion Energy Sciences, Advanced Scientific Computing Research)

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 17-May-2017
Energy & Buildings
Not all cool pavements are created equal
Cool pavements can help keep cities cool, right? Yes, but according to new research from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), many reflective pavements have some unexpected drawbacks relative to conventional pavements when considering the entire life cycle of the materials.
California Air Resources Board

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-May-2017
Advanced Materials
Scientists develop real-time technique for studying ionic liquids at electrode interfaces
This electron microscope-based imaging technique could help scientists optimize the performance of ionic liquids for batteries and other energy storage devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-May-2017
HPC4MfG paper manufacturing project yields first results
Simulations run at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as part of an HPC4Mfg collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and an industry consortium could help US paper manufacturers significantly reduce production costs and increase energy efficiencies.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-May-2017
Nature Communications
More natural dust in the air improves air quality in eastern China
Man-made pollution in eastern China's cities worsens when less dust blows in from the Gobi Desert, according to a study published May 11 in Nature Communications. That's because dust plays an important role in determining the air temperatures and thereby promoting winds to blow away man-made pollution. Less dust means the air stagnates, with man-made pollution becoming more concentrated and sticking around longer.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-May-2017
Physics of Plasmas
New model of plasma stability could help researchers predict and avoid disruptions
PPPL physicists have helped develop a new computer model of plasma stability in doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks. The new model incorporates recent findings gathered from related research efforts and simplifies the physics involved so computers can process the program more quickly. The model could help scientists predict when a plasma might become unstable and then avoid the underlying conditions.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 10-May-2017
Ames Laboratory scientist inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame
Iver Anderson, senior metallurgist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory will be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF) on May 4, 2017.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 10-May-2017
Nature Communications
Scientists help thin-film ferroelectrics go extreme
Scientists have created the first-ever polarization gradient in thin-film ferroelectrics, greatly expanding the range of functional temperatures for a key material used in a variety of everyday applications. The discovery could pave the way for developing devices capable of supporting wireless communications in extreme environments.
US Department of Energy, Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-May-2017
Scientific Reports
Scientists print nanoscale imaging probe onto tip of optical fiber
A team of researchers has developed a way to print a nanoscale imaging probe onto the tip of a glass fiber as thin as a human hair, accelerating the production of the promising new device from several per month to several per day. The high-throughput fabrication technique opens the door for the widespread adoption of this and other nano-optical structures, which squeeze and manipulate light in ways that are unachievable by conventional optics.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2017
NREL's advanced atomic layer deposition enables lithium-ion battery technology
The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has entered into an exclusive license agreement with Forge Nano to commercialize NREL's patented battery materials and systems capable of operating safely in high-stress environments. A particular feature of the technology is the encapsulation of materials with solid electrolyte coatings that can be designed to meet the increasingly demanding needs of any battery application.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2017
Nature Chemical Biology
New method of microbial energy production discovered
For all living things to succeed, they must reproduce and have the energy to do so. An organism's ability to extract energy from its surroundings-and to do it better than its competitors-is a key requirement of survival. Until recently it was thought that in all of biology, from microbes to humans, there were only two methods to generate and conserve the energy required for cellular metabolism and survival.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2017
Journal of American Chemical Society
Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University scientists develop more efficient catalytic material
Scientists at Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University have discovered a method for making smaller, more efficient intermetallic nanoparticles for fuel cell applications, and which also use less of the expensive precious metal platinum.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 8-May-2017
Scientists launch flights to gather detailed data on aerosols and clouds
For an intensive period throughout June and July, and again next January and February, scientists from US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories will take to the skies in a specially outfitted aircraft to gather data on the properties of aerosols and clouds above the Eastern North Atlantic.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-May-2017
Nature Genetics
Finding a new major gene expression regulator in fungi
Changing a single letter, or base, in an organism's genetic code impact its traits. Subtler changes can and do happen: in eukaryotes, one such modification involves adding a methyl group to base 6 of adenine (6mA). In Nature Genetics, researchers report the prevalence of 6mA modifications in the earliest branches of the fungal kingdom. This little-explored realm provides a repertoire of important and valuable gene products for DOE missions in bioenergy and environment.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 4-May-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Trash into treasure: Sandia could help biofuel pay for itself with goods made from waste
A recent discovery by Sandia National Laboratories researchers may unlock the potential of biofuel waste -- and ultimately make biofuels competitive with petroleum. The researchers solved the structure of LigM, an enzyme that breaks down molecules derived from the biofuel waste product lignin. This opens a path toward new molecules and new, marketable products.

Contact: Jules Bernstein
jberns@sandia.gov
925-294-2612
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 4-May-2017
Molecular Physics
Sandia develops math techniques to improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistry
Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level. Mathematical and algorithmic developments along these lines are necessary for enabling the detailed study of complex hydrocarbon molecules that are relevant in engine combustion.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 3-May-2017
Physical Review C
First result from Jefferson Lab's upgraded CEBAF opens door to exploring universal glue
The first experimental result has been published from the newly upgraded Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at the US Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab. The result demonstrates the feasibility of the experiment that is designed to study quark confinement: why no quark has ever been found alone.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Showing releases 1-25 out of 457.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map