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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-8 out of 8.

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017
Nature
X-ray study reveals long-sought insights into potential drug target
X-ray studies done in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have produced surprising insights into the workings of a hormone receptor associated with blood pressure regulation. Researchers believe it could be a target for new medicines related to cardiovascular conditions, neuropathic pain and tissue growth.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Dec-2016
Nature Materials
Researchers use world's smallest diamonds to make wires 3 atoms wide
Scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered a way to use diamondoids -- the smallest possible bits of diamond -- to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires, just three atoms wide.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Nature
New, detailed snapshots capture photosynthesis at room temperature
New X-ray methods at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the highest resolution room-temperature images of the protein complex photosystem II, which allows scientists to closely watch how water is split during photosynthesis at the temperature at which it occurs naturally.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Nov-2016
Nature
X-ray laser gets first real-time snapshots of a chemical flipping a biological switch
Scientists have used the powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to make the first snapshots of a chemical interaction between two biomolecules -- one that flips an RNA 'switch' that regulates production of proteins, the workhorse molecules of life.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Aug-2016
Physical Review Letters
SLAC's high-speed 'electron camera' films atomic nuclei in vibrating molecules
An ultrafast 'electron camera' at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has made the first direct snapshots of atomic nuclei in molecules that are vibrating within millionths of a billionth of a second after being hit by a laser pulse. The method, called ultrafast electron diffraction, could help scientists better understand the role of nuclear motions in light-driven processes that naturally occur on extremely fast timescales.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Aug-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
SLAC, Stanford gadget grabs more solar energy to disinfect water faster
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have created a nanostructured device, about half the size of a postage stamp, that disinfects water much faster than the UV method by also making use of the visible part of the solar spectrum, which contains 50 percent of the sun's energy.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2016
Science
Stanford-led team reveals nanoscale secrets of rechargeable batteries
An interdisciplinary team has developed a way to track how particles charge and discharge at the nanoscale, an advance that will lead to better batteries for all sorts of mobile applications.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 5-May-2016
Science
Scientists watch bacterial sensor respond to light in real time
Researchers have made a giant leap forward in taking snapshots of ultrafast reactions in a bacterial light sensor. Using the world's most powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, they were able to see atomic motions as fast as 100 quadrillionths of a second -- 1,000 times faster than ever before.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Helmholtz Association, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Academy of Finland, European Union

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing releases 1-8 out of 8.

 

 

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