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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 85.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting
Supercomputer simulations confirm observations of 2015 India/Pakistan heat waves
A paper released Dec.15 during the American Geophysical Union fall meeting in San Francisco points to new evidence of human influence on extreme weather events. After examining observational and simulated temperature and heat indexes, the research team -- which included three scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory--concluded that two separate deadly heat waves that occurred in India and Pakistan in the summer of 2015 'were exacerbated by anthropogenic climate change.'

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
Global Change Biology
Study: Warming could slow upslope migration of trees
Scientists expect trees will advance upslope as global temperatures increase, shifting the tree line -- the mountain zone where trees become smaller and eventually stop growing -- to higher elevations. Subalpine forests will follow their climate up the mountain, in other words. But new research published Dec. 15 in the journal Global Change Biology suggests this may not hold true for two subalpine tree species of western North America.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Dec-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Scientists measure pulse of CO2 emissions during spring thaw in the Arctic
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory documented a spring pulse in northern Alaska in 2014 that included CO2 emissions equivalent to 46 percent of the net CO2 that is absorbed in the summer months and methane emissions that added 6 percent to summer fluxes. What's more, recent climate trends may make such emissions more frequent, the scientists conclude.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Dec-2016
Laser R&D focuses on next-gen particle collider
A set of new laser systems and proposed upgrades at Berkeley Lab's BELLA Center will propel long-term plans for a more compact and affordable ultrahigh-energy particle collider.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-520-0843
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Dec-2016
2016 AGU Fall Meeting
Berkeley Lab researchers at AGU: Impacts of climate change, subsurface energy, understanding drought and monitoring permafrost among many talks
Berkeley Lab scientists will present on a number of topics including climate modeling challenges, projects on Arctic permafrost, induced seismicity, cloud physics, Amazon forests, hydraulic fracturing, melting ice sheets, cool roofs, and more. And meet some of our scientists who will be in the exhibit hall all week at booth #705.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Nov-2016
Applied Materials and Interfaces
Glowing crystals can detect, cleanse contaminated drinking water
Motivated by public hazards associated with contaminated sources of drinking water, a team of scientists has successfully developed and tested tiny, glowing crystals that can detect and trap heavy-metal toxins like mercury and lead.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Nov-2016
Scientific Reports
Scientists trace 'poisoning' in chemical reactions to the atomic scale
A combination of experiments, including X-ray studies at Berkeley Lab, revealed new details about pesky deposits that can stop chemical reactions vital to fuel production and other processes.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Nov-2016
Neuron
Global brain initiatives generate tsunami of neuroscience data
New technologies are giving researchers unprecedented opportunities to explore how the brain processes, utilizes, stores and retrieves information. But, without a coherent strategy to analyze, manage and understand the data generated by these new tools, advancements in the field will be limited. Berkeley Lab researchers and their collaborators offer a plan to overcome these big data challenges.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Five Berkeley lab scientists named AAAS fellows
Five scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science .

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Nature
X-rays capture unprecedented images of photosynthesis in action
An international team of scientists is providing new insight into the process by which plants use light to split water and create oxygen. In experiments led by Berkeley Lab scientists, ultrafast X-ray lasers were able to capture atomic-scale images of a protein complex found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria at room temperature.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Nov-2016
Science Advances
A new understanding of metastability clears path for next-generation materials
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have published a new study that, for the first time, explicitly quantifies the thermodynamic scale of metastability for almost 30,000 known materials. This paves the way for designing and making promising next-generation materials for use in everything from semiconductors to pharmaceuticals to steels.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2016
Cell Reports
3-D imaging technique maps migration of DNA-carrying material at the center of cells
Scientists have produced detailed 3-D visualizations that show an unexpected connectivity in the genetic material at the center of cells, providing a new understanding of a cell's evolving architecture.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2016
Science
Crop yield gets big boost with modified genes in photosynthesis
Berkeley and Illinois researchers have bumped up crop productivity by as much as 20 percent by increasing the expression of genes that result in more efficient use of light in photosynthesis. Their work could potentially be used to help address the world's future food needs.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Nov-2016
Advanced Materials
A new way to image solar cells in 3-D
Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a way to use optical microscopy to map thin-film solar cells in 3-D as they absorb photons.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2016
Physical Review Letters
Simulations show swirling rings, whirlpool-like structure in subatomic 'soup'
Powerful supercomputer simulations of high-energy collisions of atomic cores provide new insights about the complex structure of a superhot fluid called the quark-gluon plasma.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Nov-2016
Nature Materials
Solar cells get boost with integration of water-splitting catalyst onto semiconductor
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have found a way to engineer the atomic-scale chemical properties of a water-splitting catalyst for integration with a solar cell, and the result is a big boost to the stability and efficiency of artificial photosynthesis.
Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Nov-2016
Nature Communications
Study: Carbon-hungry plants impede growth rate of atmospheric CO2 
New findings suggest the rate at which CO2 is accumulating in the atmosphere has plateaued in recent years because Earth's vegetation is grabbing more carbon from the air than in previous decades. The findings are based on extensive ground and atmospheric observations of CO2, satellite measurements of vegetation, and computer modeling.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Nov-2016
Nature Photonics
We gather here today to join lasers and anti-lasers
Berkeley Lab scientists have, for the first time, achieved both lasing and anti-lasing in a single device. Their findings lay the groundwork for developing a new type of integrated device with the flexibility to operate as a laser, an amplifier, a modulator, and a detector.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Scientific Reports
Gatekeeping proteins to aberrant RNA: You shall not pass
Berkeley Lab researchers found that aberrant strands of genetic code have telltale signs that enable gateway proteins to recognize and block them from exiting the nucleus. Their findings shed light on a complex system of cell regulation that acts as a form of quality control for the transport of genetic information. A more complete picture of how genetic information gets expressed in cells is important in disease research.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
New bacteria groups, and stunning diversity, discovered underground
One of the most detailed genomic studies of any ecosystem to date has revealed an underground world of stunning microbial diversity, and added dozens of new branches to the tree of life. The bacterial bonanza comes from scientists who reconstructed the genomes of more than 2,500 microbes from sediment and groundwater samples collected at an aquifer in Colorado.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Oct-2016
Science Advances
Crystal clear imaging: Infrared brings to light nanoscale molecular arrangement
A team of researchers working at Berkeley Lab has demonstrated infrared imaging of an organic semiconductor known for its electronics capabilities, revealing key nanoscale details about the nature of its crystal features and defects that affect its performance.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Oct-2016
IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
Brain modulyzer provides interactive window into the brain
A new tool developed at Berkeley Lab allows researchers to interactively explore the hierarchical processes that happen in the brain when it is resting or performing tasks. Scientists also hope that the tool can shed some light on how neurological diseases like Alzheimer's spread throughout the brain.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2016
Science
Scientists rev up speed of bionic enzyme reactions
Bionic enzymes got a needed boost in speed thanks to new research at the Berkeley Lab. By pairing a noble metal with a natural enzyme, scientists created a hybrid capable of churning out molecules at a rate comparable to biological counterparts. The development represents a major advance for artificial metalloenzymes, which promise to open up a world of beneficial products not currently possible with natural enzymes.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2016
Science
Smallest. Transistor. Ever.
A research team led by Berkeley Lab material scientists has created a transistor with a working 1-nanometer gate, breaking a size barrier that had been set by the laws of physics. The achievement could be a key to extending the life of Moore's Law.
Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications
The incredible shrinking particle accelerator
A new data analysis/visualization toolkit developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is designed to help speed particle accelerator research and design by enabling in situ visualization and analysis of accelerator simulations at scale.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 85.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

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