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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 84.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 3-Feb-2017
npj Computational Materials
Machine learning method accurately predicts metallic defects
For the first time, Berkeley Lab researchers have built and trained machine learning algorithms to predict defect behavior in certain intermetallic compounds with high accuracy. This method will accelerate research of new advanced alloys and lightweight new materials for applications spanning automotive to aerospace and much more.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2017
Scientific Reports
Thirdhand smoke affects weight, blood cell development in mice
A new Berkeley Lab-led study found that the sticky residue left behind by tobacco smoke led to changes in weight and blood cell count in mice. These latest findings add to a growing body of evidence that thirdhand smoke exposure may be harmful.
University of California Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Feb-2017
Berkeley Lab gets $4.6 million in functional genomics catalog project
Berkeley Lab is set to receive nearly $4.6 million over four years as part of an ongoing, federally funded project to create a comprehensive catalog for fundamental genomics research. This latest expansion of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, or ENCODE 4, is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Feb-2017
Nature Communications
High-resolution imaging reveals new understanding of battery cathode particles
Using advanced imaging techniques, scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been able to observe what exactly happens inside a cathode particle as lithium-ion batteries are charged and discharged.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Feb-2017
Nature
Scientists determine precise 3-D location, identity of all 23,000 atoms in a nanoparticle
Scientists used one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes to map the precise location and chemical type of 23,000 atoms in an extremely small particle made of iron and platinum. Insights gained from the particle's structure could lead to new ways to improve its magnetic performance for use in high-density, next-generation hard drives.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jan-2017
Science
For this metal, electricity flows, but not the heat
Berkeley scientists have discovered that electrons in vanadium dioxide can conduct electricity without conducting heat, an exotic property in an unconventional material. The characteristic could lead to applications in thermoelectrics and window coatings.
Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jan-2017
Journal of Cell Science
Images show cytofilaments linking cell nucleus to extracellular environment
New images are providing the first visual evidence of a long-postulated physical link by which genes can receive mechanical cues from its microenvironment. Created by integrating six different imaging techniques, the images show thread-like cytofilaments reaching into and traversing a human breast cell's chromatin-packed nucleus.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jan-2017
$5 million foundation gift to help support US-China energy center at Berkeley Lab
In 2015, Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley, and Tsinghua University in Beijing formed the Berkeley Tsinghua Joint Research Center on Energy and Climate Change to develop scientifically based clean energy solutions and the next generation of leaders to champion those solutions. Now, that effort has received welcome support from Jim and Marilyn Simons in the amount of a $5 million donation.
Jim and Marilyn Simons

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jan-2017
Geophysical Research Letters
Bay Area methane emissions may be double what we thought
Emissions of methane, a potent climate-warming gas, in the San Francisco Bay Area may be roughly twice as high as official estimates, with most of it coming from biological sources, such as landfills, but natural gas leakage also being an important source, according to a new study from Berkeley Lab.
California Energy Commission

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jan-2017
Nature
Chemistry on the edge
Defects and jagged surfaces at the edges of nanosized platinum and gold particles are key hot spots for chemical reactivity, researchers confirmed using a unique infrared probe at Berkeley Lab.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jan-2017
Science DMZ is focus of latest library of network training videos aimed at global audience
For the second time in a year, ESnet and the NSRC have produced and released a library of short explanatory videos to help network engineers around the world gain basic knowledge, set up basic systems and drill down into areas of specific interest. In December, 15 videos detailing the Science DMZ network architecture were posted, covering the background and structure, specific designs, and techniques and technology.

Contact: Jon Bashor
JBashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Dec-2016
Nature Plants
New leaf study sheds light on 'shady' past
A new study led by a Berkeley Lab research scientist highlights a literally shady practice in plant science that has in some cases underestimated plants' rate of growth and photosynthesis, among other traits.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
New graphene-based system could help us see electrical signaling in heart and nerve cells
Scientists have enlisted the exotic properties of graphene to function like the film of an incredibly sensitive camera system in visually mapping tiny electric fields. They hope to enlist the new method to image electrical signaling networks in our hearts and brains.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting
Supercomputer simulations confirm observations of 2015 India/Pakistan heat waves
A paper released Dec.15 during the American Geophysical Union fall meeting in San Francisco points to new evidence of human influence on extreme weather events. After examining observational and simulated temperature and heat indexes, the research team -- which included three scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory--concluded that two separate deadly heat waves that occurred in India and Pakistan in the summer of 2015 'were exacerbated by anthropogenic climate change.'

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
Global Change Biology
Study: Warming could slow upslope migration of trees
Scientists expect trees will advance upslope as global temperatures increase, shifting the tree line -- the mountain zone where trees become smaller and eventually stop growing -- to higher elevations. Subalpine forests will follow their climate up the mountain, in other words. But new research published Dec. 15 in the journal Global Change Biology suggests this may not hold true for two subalpine tree species of western North America.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Dec-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Scientists measure pulse of CO2 emissions during spring thaw in the Arctic
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory documented a spring pulse in northern Alaska in 2014 that included CO2 emissions equivalent to 46 percent of the net CO2 that is absorbed in the summer months and methane emissions that added 6 percent to summer fluxes. What's more, recent climate trends may make such emissions more frequent, the scientists conclude.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Dec-2016
Laser R&D focuses on next-gen particle collider
A set of new laser systems and proposed upgrades at Berkeley Lab's BELLA Center will propel long-term plans for a more compact and affordable ultrahigh-energy particle collider.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-520-0843
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Dec-2016
2016 AGU Fall Meeting
Berkeley Lab researchers at AGU: Impacts of climate change, subsurface energy, understanding drought and monitoring permafrost among many talks
Berkeley Lab scientists will present on a number of topics including climate modeling challenges, projects on Arctic permafrost, induced seismicity, cloud physics, Amazon forests, hydraulic fracturing, melting ice sheets, cool roofs, and more. And meet some of our scientists who will be in the exhibit hall all week at booth #705.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Nov-2016
Applied Materials and Interfaces
Glowing crystals can detect, cleanse contaminated drinking water
Motivated by public hazards associated with contaminated sources of drinking water, a team of scientists has successfully developed and tested tiny, glowing crystals that can detect and trap heavy-metal toxins like mercury and lead.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Nov-2016
Scientific Reports
Scientists trace 'poisoning' in chemical reactions to the atomic scale
A combination of experiments, including X-ray studies at Berkeley Lab, revealed new details about pesky deposits that can stop chemical reactions vital to fuel production and other processes.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Nov-2016
Neuron
Global brain initiatives generate tsunami of neuroscience data
New technologies are giving researchers unprecedented opportunities to explore how the brain processes, utilizes, stores and retrieves information. But, without a coherent strategy to analyze, manage and understand the data generated by these new tools, advancements in the field will be limited. Berkeley Lab researchers and their collaborators offer a plan to overcome these big data challenges.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Five Berkeley lab scientists named AAAS fellows
Five scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science .

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Nature
X-rays capture unprecedented images of photosynthesis in action
An international team of scientists is providing new insight into the process by which plants use light to split water and create oxygen. In experiments led by Berkeley Lab scientists, ultrafast X-ray lasers were able to capture atomic-scale images of a protein complex found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria at room temperature.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Nov-2016
Science Advances
A new understanding of metastability clears path for next-generation materials
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have published a new study that, for the first time, explicitly quantifies the thermodynamic scale of metastability for almost 30,000 known materials. This paves the way for designing and making promising next-generation materials for use in everything from semiconductors to pharmaceuticals to steels.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2016
Cell Reports
3-D imaging technique maps migration of DNA-carrying material at the center of cells
Scientists have produced detailed 3-D visualizations that show an unexpected connectivity in the genetic material at the center of cells, providing a new understanding of a cell's evolving architecture.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 84.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

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