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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 46.

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Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
PNNL supports White House efforts on soil
PNNL is supporting today's announcement by the White House about efforts related to soil sustainability by sponsoring research projects through two research initiatives with funding of $20 million. The research involves a range of diverse projects looking at soil's role in Earth's climate, the environment, food and fuel production.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Where the rains come from
Intense storms have become more frequent and longer-lasting in the Great Plains and Midwest in the last 35 years. What has fueled these storms? The temperature difference between the Southern Great Plains and the Atlantic Ocean produces winds that carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains, according to a new study in Nature Communications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Nov-2016
Nature Microbiology
Genes, early environment sculpt the gut microbiome
Genetics and birthplace have a big effect on the make-up of the microbial community in the gut, according to research published Nov. 28. in the journal Nature Microbiology. The findings by a team of scientists from two Department of Energy laboratories represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.
Office of Naval Research, DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Fuel from sewage is the future -- and it's closer than you think
Sewage to fuel: PNNL research takes this renewable resource closer to reality.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Nov-2016
State's 3 largest public research institutions to increase collaboration
The state's three largest public research institutions have signed a Memorandum of Understanding, which expresses the intent of the parties to increase research collaborations on complex challenges and provide additional research and training opportunities for students in the state. The memorandum was signed recently by leaders at the University of Washington, Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Oct-2016
Nature Microbiology
Deep down fracking wells, microbial communities thrive
Microbes have a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in fracking wells. New finding help scientists understand what is happening inside fracking wells and could offer insight into processes such as corrosion and methane production.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A cooperative way to make ammonia
A better understanding of how bacteria fix nitrogen gas into nitrogen-carrying ammonia could lead to energy savings in industrial processes. Researchers are studying the bacterial enzyme that does this, a complicated enzyme called nitrogenase. In new work, researchers discovered that the two sides of nitrogenase cooperate in producing ammonia, alternating through different steps in a way that makes efficient use of the complex enzyme.
Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Super cement's secret
Mayenite is one smart cement -- it can be turned from an insulator to a transparent conductor and back. It is also suitable for use as semiconductors in flat panel displays. The secret behind mayenite's magic is a tiny change in its chemical composition. In new work in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show how components called electron anions help to transform crystalline mayenite, also called C12A7, into semiconducting glass.
Japan Science and Technology Agency, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2016
PNNL helping make hydropower cheaper, more fish-friendly
Helping fish migrate past dams could cost a fraction of conventional fish ladders with the help of PNNL's upcoming study of Whooshh Innovations' so-called Salmon Cannon.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
mSystems
Teasing out the microbiome of the Kansas prairie
PNNL scientists have untangled a soil metagenome -- all the genetic material recovered from a sample of soil -- more fully than ever before, reconstructing portions of the genomes of 129 species of microbes. While it's only a tiny proportion of the estimated 100,000 species in the sample, it's a leap forward for scientists who have had only a fraction of that success to date.
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jul-2016
mBio
When the going gets tough, the tough get growing
While relentless bright light brings many forms of cyanobacteria to their knees -- figuratively, of course -- Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 does the opposite, thriving and growing at a rate that far outpaces most of its peers. Now researchers know why: it triples in size to accommodate a rapid expansion of the cellular machinery it uses to build proteins.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jul-2016
Battery500 consortium to spark EV innovations
The PNNL-led Battery500 consortium aims to significantly improve upon the batteries that power today's electric vehicles by more nearly tripling the specific energy in lithium batteries.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Scientists create new thin material that mimics cell membranes
Materials scientists have created a new material that performs like a cell membrane found in nature. Such a material has long been sought for applications as varied as water purification and drug delivery. The material can assemble itself into a sheet thinner but stabler than a soap bubble, the researchers report July 12 in Nature Communications.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jul-2016
'Dream Team' chosen to study basic science of nuclear waste
PNNL's 'Dream Team' has been selected to lead one of four new Energy Frontier Research Centers to accelerate scientific breakthroughs needed to support the Department of Energy's cleanup mission.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
IEEE Power & Engineering Society
New tool calculates emissions impacts, energy benefits from smart grid investments
A free, web-based tool developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory estimates the emissions impacts associated for companies considering adopting various smart grid technologies.
DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jun-2016
Cell
Ovarian cancer study provides painstaking look at inner workings of tumors
Scientists have examined the collections of proteins in the tumors of 169 ovarian cancer patients to identify critical proteins present in their tumors. The researchers say their achievement illustrates the power of combining genomic and proteomic data -- an approach known as proteogenomics -- to yield a more complete picture of the biology of a cancer that is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jun-2016
PNNL to lead regional smart manufacturing center
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been named to lead the Northwest Regional Manufacturing Center as part of the national Smart Manufacturing Innovation Institute.
Department of Energy and various public/private investments

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
The clean dozen: 12 techs near commercial use
A dozen clean energy technologies that enable everything from lightweight, fuel-sipping cars to the expansion of renewable energy and cleaner fossil fuel use are getting a boost at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, thanks to $4.4 million from the Department of Energy's Technology Commercialization Fund.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
New material has potential to cut costs and make nuclear fuel recycling cleaner
Researchers are investigating a new material that might help in nuclear fuel recycling and waste reduction by capturing certain gases released during reprocessing more efficiently than today's technology. The metal-organic framework captures radioactive gases xenon and krypton at ambient temperature, eliminating an energy-intensive, expensive step.
DOE/Offices of Nuclear Energy and Science

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Weird, water-oozing material could help quench thirst
Nanorods created by PNNL researchers have an unusual property -- spontaneously emitting water. After further development, the nanorods could be used for water harvesting and purification, or sweat-gathering fabric.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Nature Microbiology
PNNL helps lead national microbiome initiative
Scientists Janet Jansson and Ljiljana Paša-Toli are part of a core group of scientists leading a national effort to understand communities of microorganisms and their role in climate science, food production and human health.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Science
Chemists settle longstanding debate on how methane is made biologically
Like the poet, microbes that make methane are taking chemists on a road less traveled: Of two competing ideas for how microbes make the main component of natural gas, the winning chemical reaction involves a molecule less favored by previous research, something called a methyl radical. Reported today in the journal Science, the work is important for understanding not only how methane is made, but also how to make things from it.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-May-2016
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Thinning out the carbon capture viscosity problem
Researchers have used computer modeling to design carbon dioxide binding materials so that they retain a low viscosity after sponging up carbon dioxide, based on a surprise they found in their explorations. Although the chemists still have to test the predicted liquid in the lab, being able to predict viscosity will help researchers find and design cheaper, more efficient carbon capture materials, they report in Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-May-2016
Ninth Symposium on Energy storage: Beyond Lithium Ion
Exploring today's research on tomorrow's battery
About 250 of the world's leading energy storage experts will gather for the Ninth Energy Storage Symposium: Beyond Lithium Ion, which runs May 24-26, 2016, at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash.

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-May-2016
Three PNNL scientists receive DOE Early Career Research awards
Three scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been selected to receive 2016 Early Career Research Program research grants from the US Department of Energy. Scientists Yingge Du, Kirsten Hofmockel and James Moran will receive funding to further their studies in climate science, energy storage, and other areas important to the nation.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 46.

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