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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 37.

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Public Release: 11-May-2017
Nature Communications
More natural dust in the air improves air quality in eastern China
Man-made pollution in eastern China's cities worsens when less dust blows in from the Gobi Desert, according to a study published May 11 in Nature Communications. That's because dust plays an important role in determining the air temperatures and thereby promoting winds to blow away man-made pollution. Less dust means the air stagnates, with man-made pollution becoming more concentrated and sticking around longer.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Apr-2017
Science
For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap together
For the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws tiny crystals together and visualized how they swivel and align. Called van der Waals forces, the attraction provides insights into how crystals self-assemble, an activity that occurs in a wide range of cases in nature, from rocks to shells to bones.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2017
Nature Nanotechnology
Video captures bubble-blowing battery in action
PNNL researchers have created a unique video that shows oxygen bubbles inflating and later deflating inside a tiny lithium-air battery. The knowledge gained from the video could help make lithium-air batteries that are more compact, stable and can hold onto a charge longer.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
3 small energy firms to collaborate with PNNL
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is collaborating with three small businesses to address technical challenges concerning hydrogen for fuel cell cars, bio-coal and nanomaterial manufacturing.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Apr-2017
2017 IEEE Symposium on High Performance Computer Architecture
Changing the game
High performance computing researcher Shuaiwen Leon Song asked if hardware called 3-D stacked memory could do something it was never designed to do -- help render 3-D graphics.
Department of Energy/Office of Science

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Apr-2017
Nature Materials
Tweaking a molecule's structure can send it down a different path to crystallization
Silky chocolate, a better medical drug, or solar panels all require the same thing: just the right crystals making up the material. Now, scientists trying to understand the paths crystals take as they form have been able to influence that path by modifying the starting ingredient.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Advantage: Water
When water comes in for a landing on the common catalyst titanium oxide, it splits into hydroxyls just under half the time. Water's oxygen and hydrogen atoms shift back and forth between existing as water or hydroxyls, and water has the slightest advantage, like the score in a highly competitive tennis game.
Department of Energy, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Mar-2017
Nature Energy
Tweaking electrolyte makes better lithium-metal batteries
New research shows adding a pinch of chemical additive to a lithium-metal battery's electrolyte helps make rechargeable batteries that are stable, charge quickly, and go longer in between charges than lithium-ion batteries.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Two PNNL researchers elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists to become members of the prestigious National Academy of Engineering.

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Nature Microbiology
Microbiomes more in flux in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are more likely to see dramatic shifts in the make-up of the community of microbes in their gut than healthy people, according to the results of a study published in Nature Microbiology. The results help physicians and scientists understand the disease more fully and potentially offer new ways to track the disease and monitor patients.
National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Örebro University Hospital Research Foundation, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vitamin B12: Power broker to the microbes
In the microbial world, vitamin B12 is a hot commodity. It turns out that vitamin B12, a substance produced by only a few organisms but needed by nearly all of them, wields great power in microbial communities -- ubiquitous structures that affect energy and food production, the environment, and human health.
DOE/Office of Science, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Russian Academy of Sciences

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jan-2017
Biofuel matchmaker: Finding the perfect algae for renewable energy
A new streamlined process could quickly pare down heaps of algae species into just a few that hold the most promise for making biofuel.
US Department of Energy/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2017
Nature Communications
Increasing rainfall in a warmer world will likely intensify typhoons in western Pacific
An analysis of the strongest tropical storms over the last half-century reveals that higher global temperatures have intensified the storms via enhanced rainfall. Rain that falls on the ocean reduces salinity and allows typhoons to grow stronger.
US Department of Energy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Pacific Northwest researchers to play key role in new Manufacturing USA Institute
PNNL and Oregon State University are part of the newest institute under the Manufacturing USA Initiative. PNNL and OSU will co-lead the Module and Component Manufacturing Focus Area for the institute.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
2016 AGU Fall Meeting
Many muons: Imaging the underground with help from the cosmos
Alain Bonneville, a geophysicist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, will present details on the muon detector for 'seeing' sequestered carbon dioxide and the comparative field tests at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco. His talk is Thursday, Dec.15, 2016 at 5:40 p.m. in Moscone South, Room 307.

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Dec-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Water: Finding the normal within the weird
Researchers have figured out a way to take snapshots of liquid water freezing within a deeply supercooled range of temperatures. This range has long remained a mystery and has given rise to the ideas that it might behave in an unusual way. It turns out water isn't as weird as it could be. Liquid water can exist all the way down to the glass transition point, crystallizing into a solid more slowly as things get colder.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Dec-2016
Sawdust reinvented into super sponge for oil spills
Oil spills could be cleaned up in the icy, rough waters of the Arctic with a chemically modified sawdust material that absorbs up to five times its weight in oil and stays afloat for at least four months.
Bureau of Safety of Environmental Enforcement

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
PNNL supports White House efforts on soil
PNNL is supporting today's announcement by the White House about efforts related to soil sustainability by sponsoring research projects through two research initiatives with funding of $20 million. The research involves a range of diverse projects looking at soil's role in Earth's climate, the environment, food and fuel production.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Where the rains come from
Intense storms have become more frequent and longer-lasting in the Great Plains and Midwest in the last 35 years. What has fueled these storms? The temperature difference between the Southern Great Plains and the Atlantic Ocean produces winds that carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains, according to a new study in Nature Communications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Nov-2016
Nature Microbiology
Genes, early environment sculpt the gut microbiome
Genetics and birthplace have a big effect on the make-up of the microbial community in the gut, according to research published Nov. 28. in the journal Nature Microbiology. The findings by a team of scientists from two Department of Energy laboratories represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.
Office of Naval Research, DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Fuel from sewage is the future -- and it's closer than you think
Sewage to fuel: PNNL research takes this renewable resource closer to reality.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Nov-2016
State's 3 largest public research institutions to increase collaboration
The state's three largest public research institutions have signed a Memorandum of Understanding, which expresses the intent of the parties to increase research collaborations on complex challenges and provide additional research and training opportunities for students in the state. The memorandum was signed recently by leaders at the University of Washington, Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Oct-2016
Nature Microbiology
Deep down fracking wells, microbial communities thrive
Microbes have a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in fracking wells. New finding help scientists understand what is happening inside fracking wells and could offer insight into processes such as corrosion and methane production.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A cooperative way to make ammonia
A better understanding of how bacteria fix nitrogen gas into nitrogen-carrying ammonia could lead to energy savings in industrial processes. Researchers are studying the bacterial enzyme that does this, a complicated enzyme called nitrogenase. In new work, researchers discovered that the two sides of nitrogenase cooperate in producing ammonia, alternating through different steps in a way that makes efficient use of the complex enzyme.
Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Super cement's secret
Mayenite is one smart cement -- it can be turned from an insulator to a transparent conductor and back. It is also suitable for use as semiconductors in flat panel displays. The secret behind mayenite's magic is a tiny change in its chemical composition. In new work in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show how components called electron anions help to transform crystalline mayenite, also called C12A7, into semiconducting glass.
Japan Science and Technology Agency, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 37.

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