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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 28.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 14-Jul-2017
Nature Communications
Mica provides clue to how water transports minerals
In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Delaware, chemists have been able to look at the interface between water and muscovite mica, a flat mineral commonly found in granite, soils and many sediments. In particular, the researchers looked at the capture and release of rubidium - a metal closely related to but more easily singled out than common elements like potassium and sodium.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2017
Nature Physics
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity
Argonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Science
Argonne X-rays used to help identify a key Lassa virus structure
Research done at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source was vital to the process of identifying the structure, which provides a guide for designing a Lassa virus vaccine. Lassa virus is endemic to Africa and kills thousands of people a year; it is particularly deadly for pregnant women.

Contact: Karen Mellen
kmellen@anl.gov
630-252-5325
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Nature
The world's most powerful X-ray laser beam creates 'molecular black hole'
With the most highly focused power of the world's most powerful X-ray laser, scientists from a number of institutions around the world -- including Argonne National Laboratory -- have conducted a new experiment that takes apart molecules electron by electron.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chemical 'dance' of cobalt catalysis could pave way to solar fuels
In a new study, scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Harvard University have been able to see for the first time an especially important chemical step in the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen -- the basic reaction at the heart of creating entirely renewable fuels from solar energy.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-May-2017
Chemical Communications
Argonne scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation
In a new study, Argonne chemist Max Delferro boosted and analyzed the unprecedented catalytic activity of an element called vanadium for hydrogenation -- a reaction that is used for making everything from vegetable oils to petrochemical products to vitamins.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-May-2017
Science
Special X-ray technique allows scientists to see 3-D deformations
In a new study published last Friday in Science, researchers at Argonne used an X-ray scattering technique called Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to reconstruct in 3-D the size and shape of grain defects. These defects create imperfections in the lattice of atoms inside a grain that can give rise to interesting material properties and effects.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2017
Scientific Reports
Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions
Two physicists at Argonne offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.
United States Department of Energy's Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (Materials Science and Engineering Division)

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2017
Science
Study reveals mystery behind formation of hollowed nanoparticles during metal oxidation
In a newly published Science paper, Argonne and Temple University researchers reveal new knowledge about the behavior of metal nanoparticles when they undergo oxidation, by integrating X-ray imaging and computer modeling and simulation. This knowledge adds to our understanding of fundamental processes like oxidation and corrosion.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Apr-2017
Nature Nanotechnology
Self-assembling polymers provide thin nanowire template
In a recent study, a team of researchers from Argonne, the University of Chicago and MIT has developed a new way to create some of the world's thinnest wires, using a process that could enable mass manufacturing with standard types of equipment.
DOE/Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Mar-2017
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Argonne invents reusable sponge that soaks up oil
Scientists at Argonne have invented a new foam, called Oleo Sponge, that not only easily adsorbs spilled oil from water, but is also reusable and can pull dispersed oil from the entire water column -- not just the surface.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Coast Guard, Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

Contact: Alex Mitchell
amitchell@anl.gov
630-252-5573
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Feb-2017
Science Advances
Researchers coax particles to form vortices using magnetic fields
Researchers at Argonne created tiny swirling vortices out of magnetic particles, providing insight into the behavior that governs such systems -- which opens up new opportunities for materials and devices with new properties.
Department of Energy/Office of Science, Materials Science and Engineering

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Feb-2017
Nature Scientific Reports
New study of ferroelectrics offers roadmap to multivalued logic for neuromorphic computing
Research published Wednesday in Nature Scientific Reports lays out a theoretical map to use ferroelectric material to process information using multivalued logic -- a leap beyond the simple ones and zeroes that make up our current computing systems that could let us process information much more efficiently.
DOE/Office of Science, Materials Science and Engineering Division, European Commission

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jan-2017
Nature Materials
For first time ever, X-ray imaging at Argonne captures material defect process
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new approach to detail the formation of material defects at the atomic scale and in near-real time, an important step that could assist in engineering better and stronger new materials.
DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Karen Mellen
mellen@anl.gov
630-252-5325
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Dec-2016
Scientific Reports
Energy cascades in quasicrystals trigger an avalanche of discovery
In a new study from Argonne National Laboratory, scientists looked at networks of magnetic material patterned into the unique and quite beautiful geometries of quasicrystals to see how the nature of the non-repeating patterns lead to the emergence of unusual energetic effects.
US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2016
The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Machine learning enables predictive modeling of 2-D materials
In a study published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, a team of researchers led by Argonne computational scientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan described their use of machine learning tools to create the first atomic-level model that accurately predicts the thermal properties of stanene, a 2-D material made up of a one-atom-thick sheet of tin.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Nov-2016
mSystems
Komodo dragons help researchers understand microbial health in captive animals
Researchers at the University of California San Diego, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the University of Chicago and Argonne are the first to identify similarities in the way in which Komodo dragons and humans and their pets share microbes within closed environments.
US Department of Energy's Laboratory Directed Research and Development, John S. Templeton Foundation, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Energy & Environmental Science
Argonne researchers study how reflectivity of biofuel crops impacts climate
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have conducted a detailed study of the albedo (reflectivity) effects of converting land to grow biofuel crops. Based on changes in albedo alone, their findings reveal that greenhouse gas emissions in land use change scenarios represent a net warming effect for ethanol made from miscanthus grass and switchgrass, but a net cooling effect for ethanol made from corn
United States Department of Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2016
Scientific Reports
Argonne researchers posit way to locally circumvent Second Law of Thermodynamics
For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. But researchers with Argonne announced recently that they may have discovered a little loophole in this famous maxim. Their research, published in Scientific Reports, lays out a possible avenue to a situation where the Second Law is violated on the microscopic level.
US Department of Energy, Swiss National Foundation, Pauli Center for Theoretical Studies at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Russian Foundation for Basic Research

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene
A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Nature Physics
Argonne ahead of the 'curve' in magnetic study
In a new study by researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions -- small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern -- do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Sep-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Seeing energized light-active molecules proves quick work for Argonne scientists
To understand how molecules undergo light-driven chemical transformations, scientists need to be able to follow the atoms and electrons within the energized molecule as it gains and loses energy. In a recent study, a team of researchers at Argonne, Northwestern University and the Technical University of Denmark used the ultrafast high-intensity pulsed X-rays produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source to take molecular snapshots of these molecules.
DOE/ Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, National Institute of Health

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Sep-2016
Argonne-led projects among $39.8 million in first-round Exascale Computing Project awards
The Exascale Computing Project today announced its first round of funding with the selection of application development proposals, including three Argonne-led projects.
United States Department of Energy, Exascale Computing Project

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Aug-2016
Journal of Chemical Physics
Argonne theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem
Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats -- the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called 'statistical' and the other 'dynamical.'
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2016
Nature
Argonne discovery yields self-healing diamond-like carbon
A group of tribologists -- scientists who study the effect of friction in machines -- and computational materials scientists at Argonne recently discovered a revolutionary diamond-like film that is generated by the heat and pressure of an automotive engine.
United States Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 28.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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