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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 31.

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Public Release: 10-Feb-2017
Nature Scientific Reports
New study of ferroelectrics offers roadmap to multivalued logic for neuromorphic computing
Research published Wednesday in Nature Scientific Reports lays out a theoretical map to use ferroelectric material to process information using multivalued logic -- a leap beyond the simple ones and zeroes that make up our current computing systems that could let us process information much more efficiently.
DOE/Office of Science, Materials Science and Engineering Division, European Commission

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jan-2017
Nature Materials
For first time ever, X-ray imaging at Argonne captures material defect process
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new approach to detail the formation of material defects at the atomic scale and in near-real time, an important step that could assist in engineering better and stronger new materials.
DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Karen Mellen
mellen@anl.gov
630-252-5325
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Dec-2016
Scientific Reports
Energy cascades in quasicrystals trigger an avalanche of discovery
In a new study from Argonne National Laboratory, scientists looked at networks of magnetic material patterned into the unique and quite beautiful geometries of quasicrystals to see how the nature of the non-repeating patterns lead to the emergence of unusual energetic effects.
US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2016
The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Machine learning enables predictive modeling of 2-D materials
In a study published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, a team of researchers led by Argonne computational scientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan described their use of machine learning tools to create the first atomic-level model that accurately predicts the thermal properties of stanene, a 2-D material made up of a one-atom-thick sheet of tin.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Nov-2016
mSystems
Komodo dragons help researchers understand microbial health in captive animals
Researchers at the University of California San Diego, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the University of Chicago and Argonne are the first to identify similarities in the way in which Komodo dragons and humans and their pets share microbes within closed environments.
US Department of Energy's Laboratory Directed Research and Development, John S. Templeton Foundation, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Energy & Environmental Science
Argonne researchers study how reflectivity of biofuel crops impacts climate
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have conducted a detailed study of the albedo (reflectivity) effects of converting land to grow biofuel crops. Based on changes in albedo alone, their findings reveal that greenhouse gas emissions in land use change scenarios represent a net warming effect for ethanol made from miscanthus grass and switchgrass, but a net cooling effect for ethanol made from corn
United States Department of Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2016
Scientific Reports
Argonne researchers posit way to locally circumvent Second Law of Thermodynamics
For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. But researchers with Argonne announced recently that they may have discovered a little loophole in this famous maxim. Their research, published in Scientific Reports, lays out a possible avenue to a situation where the Second Law is violated on the microscopic level.
US Department of Energy, Swiss National Foundation, Pauli Center for Theoretical Studies at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Russian Foundation for Basic Research

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene
A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Nature Physics
Argonne ahead of the 'curve' in magnetic study
In a new study by researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions -- small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern -- do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Sep-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Seeing energized light-active molecules proves quick work for Argonne scientists
To understand how molecules undergo light-driven chemical transformations, scientists need to be able to follow the atoms and electrons within the energized molecule as it gains and loses energy. In a recent study, a team of researchers at Argonne, Northwestern University and the Technical University of Denmark used the ultrafast high-intensity pulsed X-rays produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source to take molecular snapshots of these molecules.
DOE/ Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, National Institute of Health

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Sep-2016
Argonne-led projects among $39.8 million in first-round Exascale Computing Project awards
The Exascale Computing Project today announced its first round of funding with the selection of application development proposals, including three Argonne-led projects.
United States Department of Energy, Exascale Computing Project

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Aug-2016
Journal of Chemical Physics
Argonne theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem
Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats -- the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds of systems, scientists use two fundamentally different pictures of reality, one of which is called 'statistical' and the other 'dynamical.'
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2016
Nature
Argonne discovery yields self-healing diamond-like carbon
A group of tribologists -- scientists who study the effect of friction in machines -- and computational materials scientists at Argonne recently discovered a revolutionary diamond-like film that is generated by the heat and pressure of an automotive engine.
United States Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2016
Nature Materials
New silicon structures could make better biointerfaces
A team of researchers have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to 'biointerface' systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2016
Science
A new leaf: Scientists turn carbon dioxide back into fuel
In a new study from Argonne and the University of Illinois at Chicago, researchers have found a way to convert carbon dioxide into a usable energy source.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
Science Advances
Diamonds help generate new record for static pressures for study
An international team working at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory has devised a method for achieving 1 terapascal of static pressure -- vastly higher than any previously reached.
BES, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, DOE/Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences

Contact: Richard Fenner
fenner@anl.gov
630-252-5280
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
New X-ray method allows scientists to probe molecular explosions
A team led by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5274
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Science Advances
X-rays reveal the photonic crystals in butterfly wings that create color
Scientists used X-rays to discover what creates one butterfly effect: how the microscopic structures on the insect's wings reflect light to appear as brilliant colors to the eye.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Richard Fenner
fenner@aps.anl.gov
630-252-5280
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
A new way to control oxygen for electronic properties
Researchers at Argonne found they could use a small electric current to introduce oxygen voids, or vacancies, that dramatically change the conductivity of thin oxide films.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Food Chemistry
Tasty fat: X-rays finding the blueprint of why fat is yummy
Over three years, a University of Guelph team has brought increasingly complex samples of edible fat to the APS for research.
DOE/Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Richard Fenner
fenner@aps.anl.gov
630-252-5280
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-May-2016
Argonne technology wins 2016 TechConnect National Innovation Award
A Graphene-nanodiamond solution for achieving superlubricity that was developed at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has won a 2016 TechConnect National Innovation Award. TechConnect is a global innovation prospecting company, delivering the most promising technologies to the world's leading corporate, investment and government clients.
DOE/Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Scientific Computing Research

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-May-2016
Science
Scientists create 'magnetic charge ice'
A team of scientists working at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and led by Northern Illinois University physicist and Argonne materials scientist Zhili Xiao has created a new material, called 'rewritable magnetic charge ice,' that permits an unprecedented degree of control over local magnetic fields and could pave the way for new computing technologies.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-May-2016
Argonne National Laboratory program to provide opportunity to launch ventures
To meet this challenge, the US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Argonne National Laboratory announced today a new innovation accelerator program for science and energy entrepreneurs called Chain Reaction Innovations.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Environmental Science & Technology
Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water use in N. Dakota Bakken region
Increased water use in the rapidly growing oil industry in North Dakota's Bakken oil shale region, or play, is surprisingly due not only to oil well development but also to people, according to a recent study. Increased oil development in that region has attracted thousands of oilfield employees.
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources Defense Council, Stanford University

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-May-2016
Tribology International
Gone with the wind: Argonne coating shows surprising potential to improve reliability in wind power
A group of researchers from the Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Akron discovered that a particular form of carbon coating not necessarily designed for wind turbines may indeed prove a boon to the wind industry -- a serendipitous finding that was recently highlighted in the journal Tribology International.
US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 31.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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