U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 32.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Machine learning translates 'hidden' information to reveal chemistry in action
Scientists have developed a new way to capture the details of chemistry choreography as it happens. The method -- which relies on computers that have learned to recognize hidden signs of the steps -- should help them improve the performance of catalysts to drive reactions toward desired products faster.
DOE Office of Science and Brookhaven Lab's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Journal of the American Chemical Society
New efficient catalyst for key step in artificial photosynthesis
Chemists have designed a new 'single-site' catalyst that speeds up the rate of a key step in artificial photosynthesis. It's the first to match the efficiency of the catalytic sites that drive this reaction in nature and could greatly improve the potential for making efficient solar-to-fuel conversion devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Sep-2017
Plant Physiology
With extra sugar, leaves get fat too
Eat too much without exercising and you'll probably put on a few pounds. As it turns out, plant leaves do something similar. A new study shows that retaining sugars in plant leaves can make them get fat too. In plants, this extra fat accumulation could be a good thing. It could help turn plants into factories for making biofuels and other useful chemicals.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Sep-2017
4th International Conference on the Initial Stages in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions
New evidence for small, short-lived drops of early universe quark-gluon plasma?
Particles emerging from even the lowest energy collisions of small deuterons with large heavy nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider a US Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility for nuclear physics research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory -- exhibit behavior scientists associate with the formation of a soup of quarks and gluons, the fundamental building blocks of nearly all visible matter.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Aug-2017
Nature
'Perfect liquid' quark-gluon plasma is the most vortical fluid
Particle collisions recreating the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that filled the early universe reveal that droplets of this primordial soup swirl far faster than any other fluid. The new analysis from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) shows that the 'vorticity' of the QGP surpasses the whirling fluid dynamics of super-cell tornado cores and Jupiter's Great Red Spot, and even beats out the fastest spin record held by nanodroplets of superfluid helium.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jul-2017
Nature
Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductors
Scientists have found surprising electron behavior that may help unravel the ever-elusive mechanism behind high-temperature superconductivity -- a phenomenon in which electrical current flows freely without resistance through a material at unusually high temperatures relative to those of conventional superconductors.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2017
Nature Communications
Studying argon gas trapped in two-dimensional array of tiny 'cages'
For the first time, scientists have trapped a noble gas in a two-dimensional porous structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable detailed studies of individual gas atoms in confinement -- research that could inform the design of new materials for gas separation and nuclear waste remediation.
US Department of Energy, National Scientific and Technical Research Council of Argentina

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jul-2017
Science
Electron orbitals may hold key to unifying concept of high-temperature superconductivity
A team of scientists has found evidence for a new type of electron pairing that may broaden the search for new high-temperature superconductors. The findings provide the basis for a unifying description of how radically different copper- and iron-based 'parent' materials can develop the ability to carry electrical current with no resistance at strikingly high temperatures.
DOE Office of Science, Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative, Lundbeckfond Fellowship

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jun-2017
Science
New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen production
Scientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.
DOE/Office of Science, National Basic Research Program of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Nano Letters
X-ray study reveals way to control molecular vibrations that transmit heat
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new way to track dynamic molecular features in soft materials, including the high-frequency molecular vibrations that transmit waves of heat, sound, and other forms of energy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2017
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Scientists design molecular system for artificial photosynthesis
A molecular system for artificial photosynthesis is designed to mimic key functions of the photosynthetic center in green plants -- light absorption, charge separation, and catalysis -- to convert solar energy into chemical energy stored by hydrogen fuel.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-May-2017
Physical Review Letters
Heavy particles get caught up in the flow
By teasing out signatures of particles that decay just tenths of a millimeter from the center of a trillion-degree fireball that mimics the early universe, nuclear physicists smashing atoms at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are revealing new details about the fundamental particles that make up our world.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-May-2017
Advanced Materials
Scientists develop real-time technique for studying ionic liquids at electrode interfaces
This electron microscope-based imaging technique could help scientists optimize the performance of ionic liquids for batteries and other energy storage devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-May-2017
Scientists launch flights to gather detailed data on aerosols and clouds
For an intensive period throughout June and July, and again next January and February, scientists from US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories will take to the skies in a specially outfitted aircraft to gather data on the properties of aerosols and clouds above the Eastern North Atlantic.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2017
Nano Letters
Scientists set record resolution for drawing at the one-nanometer length scale
Using a specialized electron microscope outfitted with a pattern generator, scientists turned an imaging instrument into a lithography tool that could be used to create and study materials with new properties.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Mar-2017
Science
Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol
Results from experiments and computational modeling studies that definitively identify the 'active site' of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO2 will guide the design of improved catalysts for transforming this pollutant to useful chemicals.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2017
The Plant Cell
Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants
Scientists from Brookhaven Lab have identified a previously unknown link between a protein that maintains plant sugar balance and one that turns on oil production. The biochemical detective work points to new strategies for tapping into the energy plants capture from the sun to produce oil-based biofuels and other biomaterials.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Mar-2017
Advanced Energy Materials
Imaging the inner workings of a sodium-metal sulfide battery for first time
Scientists discover that the iron sulfide battery material undergoes significant changes in its microstructure and chemical composition as sodium ions enter and leave the material during the first discharge/charge cycle, leading to an initial loss in battery capacity.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Mar-2017
Nature Materials
Water-repellent nanotextures found to have excellent anti-fogging abilities
Nanotextures inspired by the cone-shaped structures found on the surface of cicada wings could inform new designs for materials prone to fogging, such as car and aircraft windshields.
DOE/Office of Science, French Ministry of Defense, Thales Group

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Feb-2017
Science
Scientists estimate solar nebula's lifetime
A collaborative study involving Brookhaven, MIT, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro suggests the gas cloud from which our solar system formed lasted about 4 million years.
Department of Energy, NASA

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Feb-2017
Quark Matter 2017
Exploring the matter that filled the early universe
Theorists and scientists conducting experiments that recreate matter as it existed in the very early universe are gathered in Chicago this week to present and discuss their latest results.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Nanoscale 'conversations' create complex, multi-layered structures
Scientists have developed a way to efficiently create scalable, multilayer, multi-patterned nanoscale structures with unprecedented complexity. The method introduces a significant leap in material intelligence, because each self-assembled layer guides the configuration of additional layers.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Laser pulses help scientists tease apart complex electron interactions
Using a new laser-driven 'stop-action' technique for studying complex electron interactions under dynamic conditions, scientists have identified an unusual form of energy loss in a material related to superconductors.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation, Aspen Center for Physics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, Georgetown University/McDevitt Bequest

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Science
Scientists boost catalytic activity for key chemical reaction in fuel cells
New catalysts containing platinum and lead could improve the efficiency of fuel cells -- a promising technology for producing clean energy.
DOE/Office of Science, California State University-Northridge, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, National Basic Research Program of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Ministry of Science and Technology

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D
To help tackle the challenge of finding effective, inexpensive catalysts for fuel cells, scientists at Brookhaven Lab have produced dynamic, 3-D images that reveal how catalytic nanoparticles evolve as they are processed.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 32.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map