U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 494.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 6-Oct-2016
CMI announces domestic rare-earth magnet partnership with INFINIUM
The US Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute announced today a new partnership with INFINIUM, a metals production technology company, to demonstrate the production of rare-earth magnets sourced and manufactured entirely in the US.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
Enhancing the superconducting properties of an iron-based material
By bombarding the material with low-energy protons, scientists doubled the amount of current the material could carry without resistance, while raising the temperature at which this superconducting state emerges. Their method could be used to improve the performance of superconducting wires and tapes for electric vehicles, wind turbines, medical imaging devices, and other applications.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation, State of Florida

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2016
Science
Scientists rev up speed of bionic enzyme reactions
Bionic enzymes got a needed boost in speed thanks to new research at the Berkeley Lab. By pairing a noble metal with a natural enzyme, scientists created a hybrid capable of churning out molecules at a rate comparable to biological counterparts. The development represents a major advance for artificial metalloenzymes, which promise to open up a world of beneficial products not currently possible with natural enzymes.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2016
Science
Smallest. Transistor. Ever.
A research team led by Berkeley Lab material scientists has created a transistor with a working 1-nanometer gate, breaking a size barrier that had been set by the laws of physics. The achievement could be a key to extending the life of Moore's Law.
Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications
The incredible shrinking particle accelerator
A new data analysis/visualization toolkit developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is designed to help speed particle accelerator research and design by enabling in situ visualization and analysis of accelerator simulations at scale.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
Sled track simulates high-speed accident in B61-12 test
Sandia National Laboratories sent a mock B61-12 nuclear weapon speeding down the labs' 10,000-foot rocket sled track to slam nose-first into a steel and concrete wall in a spectacular test that mimicked a high-speed accident. It allowed engineers to examine safety features inside the weapon that prevent inadvertent nuclear detonation.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
Physical Review A
Sensors -- quantum leap
By exploiting some exotic quantum states, researchers have conceptually designed a sensor that features unparalleled sensitivity. In a paper published in Physical Review A, Ali Passian of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and George Siopsis of the University of Tennessee describe a photon-sensing scheme for a detector that would behave much like a miniature trampoline.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
Brookhaven Lab to play major role in 2 DOE exascale computing application projects
Scientists will help develop modeling and simulation applications for next-generation supercomputers to enable advances in nuclear and high-energy physics and chemistry research.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
Samsung licenses ORNL transparent superhydrophobic glass coatings for electronic devices
Samsung Electronics has exclusively licensed optically clear superhydrophobic film technology from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to improve the performance of glass displays on smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices. ORNL's development of a transparent coating that repels water that carries away dust and dirt, reduces light reflection and resists fingerprints and smudges resulted from approximately three years of superhydrophobic research on glass-based coatings.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
For normal heart function, look beyond the genes
Berkeley Lab researchers have compiled a comprehensive genome-wide map of more than 80,000 enhancers considered relevant to human heart development and function. They went on to test two of the enhancers in mice, showing that when the enhancers were missing, the heart worked abnormally. The finding bolsters the importance of DNA segments once considered 'junk.'
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
GreenWood Resources licenses ORNL invention to boost biofuel yield
GreenWood Resources has licensed an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology based on the discovery of a gene in poplar (Populus trichocarpa) that makes it easier to convert poplar trees into biofuels. GreenWood, a global timberland investment and asset management company based in Oregon, plans to commercialize the technology to select and breed better varieties of poplar with less lignin content, which simplifies the conversion process and ultimately lowers the overall costs of biofuel production.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
Advanced Electronic Materials
Complex materials can self-organize into circuits, may form basis for multifunction chips
Researchers studying the behavior of nanoscale materials at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered remarkable behavior that could advance microprocessors beyond today's silicon-based chips. The study, featured on the cover of Advanced Electronic Materials, shows that a single crystal complex oxide material, when confined to micro- and nanoscales, can act like a multi-component electrical circuit.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
ORNL licenses rare earth magnet recycling process to Momentum Technologies
The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Momentum Technologies have signed a non-exclusive licensing agreement for an ORNL process designed to recover rare earth magnets from used computer hard drives. The patent-pending process developed as part of DOE's Critical Materials Institute is designed to economically recover large amounts of magnets made using neodymium--a rare earth element that is mined outside the United States.

Contact: Stephanie G. Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A cooperative way to make ammonia
A better understanding of how bacteria fix nitrogen gas into nitrogen-carrying ammonia could lead to energy savings in industrial processes. Researchers are studying the bacterial enzyme that does this, a complicated enzyme called nitrogenase. In new work, researchers discovered that the two sides of nitrogenase cooperate in producing ammonia, alternating through different steps in a way that makes efficient use of the complex enzyme.
Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
Nanoscale
Electron beam microscope directly writes nanoscale features in liquid with metal ink
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to harness a scanning transmission electron microscope to directly write tiny patterns in metallic 'ink,' forming features in liquid that are finer than half the width of a human hair. The automated process is controlled by weaving a STEM instrument's electron beam through a liquid-filled cell to spur deposition of metal onto a silicon microchip. The patterns created are nanoscale.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
Water Research
New technology helps pinpoint sources of water contamination
When the local water management agency closes your favorite beach due to unhealthy water quality, how reliable are the tests they base their decisions on? As it turns out, those tests, as well as the standards behind them, have not been updated in decades. Now scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a highly accurate, DNA-based method to detect and distinguish sources of microbial contamination in water.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
IEEE International Conference on Rebooting Computing
Turning to the brain to reboot computing
Computation is stuck in a rut. The integrated circuits that powered the past 50 years of technological revolution are reaching their physical limits. This predicament has computer scientists scrambling for new ideas. Researchers from Sandia National Laboratories will present three papers at the IEEE International Conference on Rebooting Computing held Oct. 17-19, highlighting the breadth of potential non-traditional neural computing applications.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oct. 2016
Using the Titan supercomputer, an ORNL-led team is making progress towards automated data tools for cancer research to glean unprecedented view of the US cancer population; ORNL researchers have produced the next generation of the National Hydropower Map that provides updated statistics on overall capacity and performance on the nation's hydropower fleet; ORNL-developed Autotune building energy model calibration software beat the industry's energy efficiency standards while automating the equivalent of about 45 man-hours of calibration.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Steven Sabbagh leads research on prediction and avoidance of KSTAR disruptions
An article describes a project to study prediction and avoidance of KSTAR plasma disruptions.
US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Nature Materials
Water vapor sets some oxides aflutter
A team of scientists has discovered a phenomenon that could have practical applications in solar cells, rechargeable battery electrodes, and water-splitting devices.
National Science Foundation, Skoltech-MIT Center for Electrochemical Energy Storage, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Transformational X-ray project takes a step forward
A proposed upgrade to the Advanced Light Source -- which would provide new views of materials and chemistry at the nanoscale with X-ray beams up to 1,000 times brighter than possible now -- has cleared the first step in a Department of Energy approval process. The upgrade would enable new explorations of chemical reactions, battery performance, and biological processes.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene
A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Nature Physics
Argonne ahead of the 'curve' in magnetic study
In a new study by researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions -- small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern -- do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Science Advances
Study yields new knowledge about materials for ultrasound and other applications
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their research partners have used neutron scattering to discover the key to piezoelectric excellence in the newer materials, which are called relaxor-based ferroelectrics. (A ferroelectric material has electrical polarization that is reversed by application of an electric field.) Their findings, published online in the journal Science Advances, may provide knowledge needed to accelerate the design of functional materials for diverse applications.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Sep-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Seeing energized light-active molecules proves quick work for Argonne scientists
To understand how molecules undergo light-driven chemical transformations, scientists need to be able to follow the atoms and electrons within the energized molecule as it gains and loses energy. In a recent study, a team of researchers at Argonne, Northwestern University and the Technical University of Denmark used the ultrafast high-intensity pulsed X-rays produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source to take molecular snapshots of these molecules.
DOE/ Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, National Institute of Health

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 176-200 out of 494.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map