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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 528.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 1-Nov-2016
Scientific Reports
3-D-printed permanent magnets outperform conventional versions, conserve rare materials
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated that permanent magnets produced by additive manufacturing can outperform bonded magnets made using traditional techniques while conserving critical materials. Scientists fabricated isotropic, near-net-shape, neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) bonded magnets at DOE's Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) machine.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office

Contact: Stephanie Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Nov-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NREL researchers discover how a bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, utilizes both CO2 and cellulose
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory made the surprise discovery that a metabolic pathway to take up CO2 exists and functions in a microorganism capable of breaking down and fermenting cellulosic biomass to produce biofuels including hydrogen and hydrocarbons.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2016
Nature Geoscience
Clouds are impeding global warming... for now
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have identified a mechanism that causes low clouds -- and their influence on Earth's energy balance -- to respond differently to global warming depending on their spatial pattern.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Oct-2016
Collaboration yields open source technology for computational science
The gap between the computational science and open source software communities just got smaller -- thanks to an international collaboration among national laboratories, universities and industry.

Contact: Scott Jones
jonesg@ornl.gov
865-241-6491
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2016
International Atomic Energy Ageny
R. Goldston receives 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award
R. Goldston receives 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award for best paper.
US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2016
'Higgs hunter' Sally Dawson receives J.J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics
Sally Dawson, a theoretical physicist at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, has been named a recipient of the 2017 J.J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Oct-2016
PPPL inventors honored for device to create isotope vital for diagnosing diseases
Scientists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have received the 2016 Edison Patent Award for their invention of an on-demand method to create a badly needed isotope used in medical imaging devices to diagnose diseases such as cancer and heart disease.

Contact: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
jjackson@pppl.gov
609-243-2757
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Oct-2016
Physical Review Letters
Nickel-78 is a 'doubly magic' isotope, supercomputing calculations confirm
'Doubly magic' atomic nuclei have greater stability than their neighbors thanks to having shells that are fully occupied by both protons and neutrons. Theoretical physicists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently used Titan, America's most powerful supercomputer, to compute the nuclear structure of nickel-78 and found that this neutron-rich nucleus is indeed doubly magic. The results may improve understanding of the origin, organization and interactions of stable matter.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Oct-2016
International Atomic Energy Agency
First results of NSTX-U research operations
Description of first results of NSTX-U and related findings reported at IAEA conference

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Oct-2016
Six ORNL researchers elected fellows of the American Physical Society
Six researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been elected fellows of the American Physical Society.

Contact: Sean Simoneau
simoneausm@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Oct-2016
Nature Microbiology
Deep down fracking wells, microbial communities thrive
Microbes have a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in fracking wells. New finding help scientists understand what is happening inside fracking wells and could offer insight into processes such as corrosion and methane production.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
New bacteria groups, and stunning diversity, discovered underground
One of the most detailed genomic studies of any ecosystem to date has revealed an underground world of stunning microbial diversity, and added dozens of new branches to the tree of life. The bacterial bonanza comes from scientists who reconstructed the genomes of more than 2,500 microbes from sediment and groundwater samples collected at an aquifer in Colorado.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Oct-2016
Nature
Amazon rainstorms transport atmospheric particles for cloud formation
Understanding how tiny particles emitted by cars and factories affect Earth's climate requires accurate climate modeling and the ability to quantify the effects of these pollutant particles vs. particles naturally present in the atmosphere. To better understand the baseline, scientists describe how they tracked particles in the largely pristine atmosphere over the Amazon rainforest -- effectively turning back the clock a few hundred years.
US Department of Energy, Amazonas State Research Foundation, São Paulo Research Foundation, Brazil Scientific Mobility Program, Max Planck Society, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2016
Scientific Reports
Argonne researchers posit way to locally circumvent Second Law of Thermodynamics
For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. But researchers with Argonne announced recently that they may have discovered a little loophole in this famous maxim. Their research, published in Scientific Reports, lays out a possible avenue to a situation where the Second Law is violated on the microscopic level.
US Department of Energy, Swiss National Foundation, Pauli Center for Theoretical Studies at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Russian Foundation for Basic Research

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Oct-2016
Science Advances
Ames Laboratory scientists gain insight on mechanism of unconventional superconductivity
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and partner institutions conducted a systematic investigation into the properties of the newest family of unconventional superconducting materials, iron-based compounds. The study may help the scientific community discover new superconducting materials with unique properties.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Oct-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Unraveling the science behind biomass breakdown
Using the Titan supercomputer, an ORNL team created models of up to 330,000 atoms that led to the discovery of a THF-water cosolvent phase separation on the faces of crystalline cellulose fiber.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Gedenk
gedenked@ornl.gov
865-241-5497
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Oct-2016
Ames Laboratory to receive $3 million to develop instrumentation to study plant cell walls
A team of scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory will be developing new instrumentation aimed at determining the chemical and structural makeup of plant cell walls. The group is receiving $1 million a year for three years from the DOE's Office of Science to develop a subdiffraction Raman imaging platform that will provide an unprecedented look at the specific chemical structures of plant cell walls and then determine how best to deconstruct plant material as a source of biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Oct-2016
Science
Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge
Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.
Sandia National Laboratories

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 14-Oct-2016
Physical Review Letters
Scientists find static 'stripes' of electrical charge in copper-oxide superconductor
Understanding the electronic ordering in copper-oxide superconductors could help scientists find the 'recipe' for raising the temperature at which current can flow through these materials without energy loss.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Oct-2016
Science Advances
Crystal clear imaging: Infrared brings to light nanoscale molecular arrangement
A team of researchers working at Berkeley Lab has demonstrated infrared imaging of an organic semiconductor known for its electronics capabilities, revealing key nanoscale details about the nature of its crystal features and defects that affect its performance.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2016
Ames Laboratory senior scientist Paul C. Canfield receives James C. McGroddy Prize
Professor Paul C. Canfield, a senior scientist at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory has been awarded the James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials by the American Physical Society (APS).

Contact: Steve
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2016
ORNL offers new partnership opportunities for small businesses
Small businesses in the clean-energy sector have another opportunity to request technical assistance from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the DOE Small Business Vouchers Pilot.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2016
Wave energy researchers dive deep to advance clean energy source
One of the biggest untapped clean energy sources on the planet -- wave energy -- could one day power millions of homes across the US. But more than a century after the first tests of the power of ocean waves, it is still one of the hardest energy sources to capture. Now, engineers at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting the largest model-scale wave energy testing of its kind to improve the performance of wave-energy converters.

Contact: Rebecca Brock
rabrock@sandia.gov
505-844-7772
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 13-Oct-2016
Tomoyasu Mani wins 2016 Blavatnik Regional Award for Young Scientists
Mani is being recognized for his work at Brookhaven Lab to understand the physical processes occurring in organic materials used to harness solar energy.

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Oct-2016
ChemistrySelect
Nano-spike catalysts convert carbon dioxide directly into ethanol
In a new twist to waste-to-fuel technology, scientists have developed an electrochemical process that uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper to turn carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, into ethanol.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 528.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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