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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 491.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 10-Jan-2017
Science DMZ is focus of latest library of network training videos aimed at global audience
For the second time in a year, ESnet and the NSRC have produced and released a library of short explanatory videos to help network engineers around the world gain basic knowledge, set up basic systems and drill down into areas of specific interest. In December, 15 videos detailing the Science DMZ network architecture were posted, covering the background and structure, specific designs, and techniques and technology.

Contact: Jon Bashor
JBashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2017
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Crystallization method offers new option for carbon capture from ambient air
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a simple, reliable process to capture carbon dioxide directly from ambient air, offering a new option for carbon capture and storage strategies to combat global warming.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jan-2017
Top 10 PPPL stories that you shouldn't miss
Article summarizes top 10 laboratory developments and discoveries in 2016.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2017
Nature Communications
Increasing rainfall in a warmer world will likely intensify typhoons in western Pacific
An analysis of the strongest tropical storms over the last half-century reveals that higher global temperatures have intensified the storms via enhanced rainfall. Rain that falls on the ocean reduces salinity and allows typhoons to grow stronger.
US Department of Energy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2017
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2017
Researchers identify patterns that could be valuable resource for superconductivity research; ORNL researchers developing approaches to preserve forests, wildlife; ORNL supercomputer helping scientists push boundaries; New measurement technique opens pathway to new graphene-based energy, electronic applications; and ORNL cryogenic memory cell circuit could advance pathway to quantum computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jan-2017
Sandia forms Spray Combustion Consortium to improve engine design
Sandia National Laboratories has formed an industry-funded Spray Combustion Consortium to better understand fuel injection by developing modeling tools. Control of fuel sprays is key to the development of clean, affordable fuel-efficient engines.
DOE/Sandia National Laboratory, DOE/Argonne National Laboratory, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Toyota Motor Corp., Renault, Convergent Science, Cummins, Hino Motors, Isuzu and Ford Motor Co.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 26-Dec-2016
Nature Materials
Researchers use world's smallest diamonds to make wires 3 atoms wide
Scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered a way to use diamondoids -- the smallest possible bits of diamond -- to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires, just three atoms wide.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2016
Physics Review Letters
Feeding the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way
Feature describes method for modeling accretion disk that feeds supermassive Sagittarius A.
National Science Foundation, Lyman Spitzer, Jr. Fellowship, Simons Foundation, and David and Lucille Packard Foundation

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Nanoscale 'conversations' create complex, multi-layered structures
Scientists have developed a way to efficiently create scalable, multilayer, multi-patterned nanoscale structures with unprecedented complexity. The method introduces a significant leap in material intelligence, because each self-assembled layer guides the configuration of additional layers.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Dec-2016
Neutron diffraction probes forms of carbon dioxide in extreme environments
Through a Deep Carbon Observatory collaboration, Adam Makhluf of the University of California, Los Angeles's Earth, Space and Planetary Science Department and Chris Tulk of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Chemical and Engineering Materials Division are using neutrons to study the fundamental role carbon dioxide plays in Earth's carbon cycle, especially in the composition of carbon reservoirs in the deep earth and the evolution of the carbon cycle over time.
Sloan Foundation, US Department of Energy/ Basic Energy Science

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Laser pulses help scientists tease apart complex electron interactions
Using a new laser-driven 'stop-action' technique for studying complex electron interactions under dynamic conditions, scientists have identified an unusual form of energy loss in a material related to superconductors.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation, Aspen Center for Physics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, Georgetown University/McDevitt Bequest

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Dec-2016
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
DNA markers distinguish between harmless, deadly bacteria
Through a new study of the coccobacillus Francisella, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers are working to use DNA markers to discern related but relatively harmless species as they are identified and to provide a means to distinguish them from the harmful F. tularensis.
US Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Dec-2016
Nature Plants
New leaf study sheds light on 'shady' past
A new study led by a Berkeley Lab research scientist highlights a literally shady practice in plant science that has in some cases underestimated plants' rate of growth and photosynthesis, among other traits.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Pacific Northwest researchers to play key role in new Manufacturing USA Institute
PNNL and Oregon State University are part of the newest institute under the Manufacturing USA Initiative. PNNL and OSU will co-lead the Module and Component Manufacturing Focus Area for the institute.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
2016 AGU Fall Meeting
Many muons: Imaging the underground with help from the cosmos
Alain Bonneville, a geophysicist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, will present details on the muon detector for 'seeing' sequestered carbon dioxide and the comparative field tests at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco. His talk is Thursday, Dec.15, 2016 at 5:40 p.m. in Moscone South, Room 307.

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Science
Scientists boost catalytic activity for key chemical reaction in fuel cells
New catalysts containing platinum and lead could improve the efficiency of fuel cells -- a promising technology for producing clean energy.
DOE/Office of Science, California State University-Northridge, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, National Basic Research Program of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Ministry of Science and Technology

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
New graphene-based system could help us see electrical signaling in heart and nerve cells
Scientists have enlisted the exotic properties of graphene to function like the film of an incredibly sensitive camera system in visually mapping tiny electric fields. They hope to enlist the new method to image electrical signaling networks in our hearts and brains.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
Physical Review Letters
New theoretical framework for improved particle accelerators
Article describes new theoretical framework for next-generation particle accelerators.
National Research Foundation of Korea, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting
Supercomputer simulations confirm observations of 2015 India/Pakistan heat waves
A paper released Dec.15 during the American Geophysical Union fall meeting in San Francisco points to new evidence of human influence on extreme weather events. After examining observational and simulated temperature and heat indexes, the research team -- which included three scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory--concluded that two separate deadly heat waves that occurred in India and Pakistan in the summer of 2015 'were exacerbated by anthropogenic climate change.'

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
Global Change Biology
Study: Warming could slow upslope migration of trees
Scientists expect trees will advance upslope as global temperatures increase, shifting the tree line -- the mountain zone where trees become smaller and eventually stop growing -- to higher elevations. Subalpine forests will follow their climate up the mountain, in other words. But new research published Dec. 15 in the journal Global Change Biology suggests this may not hold true for two subalpine tree species of western North America.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Dec-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Scientists measure pulse of CO2 emissions during spring thaw in the Arctic
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory documented a spring pulse in northern Alaska in 2014 that included CO2 emissions equivalent to 46 percent of the net CO2 that is absorbed in the summer months and methane emissions that added 6 percent to summer fluxes. What's more, recent climate trends may make such emissions more frequent, the scientists conclude.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Dec-2016
Laser R&D focuses on next-gen particle collider
A set of new laser systems and proposed upgrades at Berkeley Lab's BELLA Center will propel long-term plans for a more compact and affordable ultrahigh-energy particle collider.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-520-0843
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Dec-2016
2016 AGU Fall Meeting
First detection of boron on the surface of Mars
Boron has been identified for the first time on the surface of Mars, indicating the potential for long-term habitable groundwater in the ancient past.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Dec-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Water: Finding the normal within the weird
Researchers have figured out a way to take snapshots of liquid water freezing within a deeply supercooled range of temperatures. This range has long remained a mystery and has given rise to the ideas that it might behave in an unusual way. It turns out water isn't as weird as it could be. Liquid water can exist all the way down to the glass transition point, crystallizing into a solid more slowly as things get colder.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Dec-2016
Scientific Reports
Energy cascades in quasicrystals trigger an avalanche of discovery
In a new study from Argonne National Laboratory, scientists looked at networks of magnetic material patterned into the unique and quite beautiful geometries of quasicrystals to see how the nature of the non-repeating patterns lead to the emergence of unusual energetic effects.
US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 491.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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