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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 447.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jun-2017
Chemistry of Materials
Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered that they could functionalize magnetic materials through a thoroughly unlikely method, by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2017
Cut US commercial building energy use 29 percent with widespread controls
The US could slash its energy use by the equivalent of what is currently used by 12 to 15 million Americans if commercial buildings fully used energy-efficiency controls nationwide.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jun-2017
Science
Study sheds light on how bacterial organelles assemble
Scientists at Berkeley Lab and Michigan State University are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. This work could benefit research in bioenergy and pathogenesis, and it could lead to new methods of bioengineering bacteria for beneficial purposes.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jun-2017
Science
New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen production
Scientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.
DOE/Office of Science, National Basic Research Program of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jun-2017
Nature
Researchers find new mechanism for genome regulation
The mechanisms that separate mixtures of oil and water may also help the organization of a part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new Berkeley Lab study. Researchers found that liquid-liquid phase separation helps heterochromatin organize large parts of the genome into specific regions of the nucleus. The work addresses a long-standing question about how DNA functions are organized in space and time, including how genes are silenced or expressed.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jun-2017
Keeping California's natural gas system safe
The massive natural gas leak at Aliso Canyon shined a light on California's aging natural gas infrastructure. And five years of extreme drought also exacted its toll on transmission pipelines. Now the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been awarded $4.6 million by the California Energy Commission for two projects aimed at improving the safety and reliability of the state's natural gas system.
California Energy Commission

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jun-2017
Nature Materials
Sound waves direct particles to self-assemble, self-heal
Berkeley Lab scientists have demonstrated how floating particles will assemble and synchronize in response to acoustic waves. Their simple experiment provides a new framework for studying how seemingly lifelike behaviors emerge in response to external forces. The work could help address fundamental questions about energy dissipation and non-equilibrium thermodynamics.
Office of Naval Research, Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2017
Nature Physics
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity
Argonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2017
DOE awards six research contracts totaling $258 million to boost US exascale technology
Today US Secretary of Energy Rick Perry announced that six leading US technology companies will receive funding from the Department of Energy's Exascale Computing Project (ECP) as part of its new PathForward program, accelerating the research necessary to deploy the nation's first exascale supercomputers.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: DOE Public Affairs
doenews@hq.doe.gov
202-586-4940
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 15-Jun-2017
Chemistry of Materials
Development of low-dimensional nanomaterials could revolutionize future technologies
Javier Vela, scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, believes improvements in computer processors, TV displays and solar cells will come from scientific advancements in the synthesis of low-dimensional nanomaterials.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2017
US-China collaboration makes excellent start in optimizing lithium to control plasma
For fusion to generate substantial energy, the ultra-hot plasma that fuels fusion reactions must remain stable and kept from cooling. Researchers have recently shown lithium, a soft, silver-white metal, to be effective in both respects during path-setting US-Chinese experiments on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in Hefei, China.
US Department of Energy, China's National Magnetic Fusion Science Program, China's National Nature Science Foundation, and China's A3 Foresight Program

Contact: Rajesh Maingi
rmaingi@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Science
Argonne X-rays used to help identify a key Lassa virus structure
Research done at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source was vital to the process of identifying the structure, which provides a guide for designing a Lassa virus vaccine. Lassa virus is endemic to Africa and kills thousands of people a year; it is particularly deadly for pregnant women.

Contact: Karen Mellen
kmellen@anl.gov
630-252-5325
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Nano Energy
A seaweed derivative could be just what lithium-sulfur batteries need
Lithium-sulfur batteries have great potential as a low-cost, high-energy, energy source for both vehicle and grid applications. However, they suffer from significant capacity fading. Now scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have made a surprising discovery that could fix this problem.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Science Advances
NREL-led research effort creates new alloys, phase diagram
A multi-institutional team led by the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered a way to create new alloys that could form the basis of next-generation semiconductors.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers find a surprise just beneath the surface in carbon dioxide experiment
An X-ray technique, coupled with theoretical work, revealed how oxygen atoms embedded very near the surface of a copper sample had a more dramatic effect on the early stages of the reaction with carbon dioxide (CO2) than earlier theories could account for. This information could prove useful in designing new types of materials to further enhance reactions and make them more efficient in converting carbon dioxide into liquid fuels and other products.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017
Nature Biotechnology
Uncovered: 1,000 new microbial genomes
US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute scientists have taken a decisive step forward in uncovering the planet's microbial diversity. In Nature Biotechnology, they report the release of 1,003 phylogenetically diverse bacterial and archaeal reference genomes -- the single largest release to date. The DOE is interested in learning more about this biodiversity because microbes play important roles in regulating Earth's biogeochemical cycles and uncovering gene functions and metabolic pathways has wide applications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Nano Letters
Simulations pinpoint atomic-level defects in solar cell nanostructures
Heterogeneous nanostructured materials are widely used in various optoelectronic devices, including solar cells. However, the nano-interfaces contain structural defects that can affect performance. Calculations run at NERSC helped researchers ID the root cause of the defects in two materials and provide design rules to avoid them.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Nature
The world's most powerful X-ray laser beam creates 'molecular black hole'
With the most highly focused power of the world's most powerful X-ray laser, scientists from a number of institutions around the world -- including Argonne National Laboratory -- have conducted a new experiment that takes apart molecules electron by electron.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Mechanical engineering society elects 4 fellows from Sandia Labs
Fellows of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers make up only 3.1 percent of ASME's 107,895 members. Sandia National Laboratories engineers Cliff Ho, Alexander Brown, Hy Tran and Kevin Dowding now are members of that elite group.

Contact: Kristen Meub
klmeub@sandia.gov
505-845-7215
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Science
Neutrons zero in on the elusive magnetic Majorana fermion
Neutron scattering has revealed in unprecedented detail new insights into the exotic magnetic behavior of a material that could pave the way for quantum calculations far beyond the limits of a computer's binary code. A research team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has confirmed magnetic signatures likely related to Majorana fermions -- elusive particles that could be the basis for a quantum bit, or qubit, in a 2-D graphene-like material, alpha-ruthenium trichloride.
DOE/Basic Energy Sciences, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DAAD

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Nano Letters
X-ray study reveals way to control molecular vibrations that transmit heat
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new way to track dynamic molecular features in soft materials, including the high-frequency molecular vibrations that transmit waves of heat, sound, and other forms of energy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jun-2017
Eck Industries exclusively licenses cerium-aluminum alloy co-developed by ORNL
Wisconsin's Eck Industries has signed an exclusive license for the commercialization of a cerium-aluminum (Ce-Al) alloy co-developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is ideal for creating lightweight, strong components for advanced vehicles and airplanes.

Contact: Stephanie Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jun-2017
'Charliecloud' simplifies Big Data supercomputing
At Los Alamos National Laboratory, home to more than 100 supercomputers since the dawn of the computing era, elegance and simplicity of programming are highly valued but not always achieved. In the case of a new product, dubbed 'Charliecloud,' a crisp 800-line code helps supercomputer users operate in the high-performance world of Big Data without burdening computer center staff with the peculiarities of their particular software needs.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2017
Follow the fantastic voyage of the ICARUS neutrino detector
The ICARUS neutrino detector, the largest of its kind, will make its way across the ocean to Fermilab this summer, where it will join the hunt for sterile neutrinos.
US Department of Energy, CERN, Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jun-2017
Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2017
ORNL developed an efficient, economical approach to locate petroleum- and natural gas-rich shale; an ORNL-led team discovered an electrochemical and ferroelectric link in ultrathin crystalline films, explaining a decade of anomalous behavior; Dallas-based Momentum Technologies non-exclusively licensed ORNL's 3-D-printed magnets made from recycled materials; ORNL's 'lucky finding' led to simple synthesis of ordered mesoporous materials from plants; team develops 3-D-printed heat exchanger for power plants that achieved 500 percent thermal conductivity increase using novel composites.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 76-100 out of 447.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

 

 

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