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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 130.

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Public Release: 16-Nov-2017
Science
Detailed view of immune proteins could lead to new pathogen-defense strategies
Biologists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley used cryo-EM to resolve the structure of a ring of proteins used by the immune system to summon support when under attack, providing new insight into potential strategies for protection from pathogens. The researchers captured the high-resolution image of a protein ring, called an inflammasome, as it was bound to flagellin, a protein from the whiplike tail used by bacteria to propel themselves forward.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Nov-2017
Cell Host & Microbe
Unlocking the secrets of Ebola
Scientists have identified a set of biomarkers that indicate which patients infected with the Ebola virus are most at risk of dying from the disease. The results come from one of the most in-depth studies ever of blood samples from patients with Ebola. Researchers found 11 biomarkers that distinguish fatal infections from non-fatal ones and two that, when screened for early upon symptom onset, accurately predict which patients are likely to die.
Japanese Health and Labor Sciences Research Grant, Ministry of Education, Cultures, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, Emerging/Re-emerging Infectious Diseases Project of Japan, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and others

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Nov-2017
ACS Nano
X-rays reveal the biting truth about parrotfish teeth
A new study has revealed a chain mail-like woven microstructure that gives parrotfish teeth their remarkable ability to chomp on coral all day long - the structure could serve as a blueprint for designing ultra-durable synthetic materials.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Nov-2017
Nature Microbiology
To find new biofuel enzymes, it can take a microbial village
In search of new plant enzymes? Try looking in compost. Researchers at JBEI have demonstrated the importance of microbial communities as a source of stable enzymes that could be used to convert plants to biofuels. This approach yields robust enzymes that researchers can't easily obtain from isolates.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Nov-2017
ACS Catalysis
Neutrons probe oxygen-generating enzyme for a greener approach to clean water
A new study sheds light on a unique enzyme that could provide an eco-friendly treatment for chlorite-contaminated water supplies and improve water quality worldwide. An international team of researchers used neutron analysis at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, X-ray crystallography and other techniques to study chlorite dismutase, an enzyme that breaks down the environmental pollutant chlorite into harmless byproducts. Their results advance understanding of the catalytic process involved to support future applications in bioremediation and biotechnology.

Contact: Ashley Huff
huffac@ornl.gov
865-241-6451
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Nov-2017
INCITE grants of 5.95 billion hours awarded to 55 computational research projects
The US Department of Energy's Office of Science announced 55 projects with high potential for accelerating discovery through its Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program. The projects will share 5.95 billion core-hours on three of America's most powerful supercomputers dedicated to capability-limited open science and support a broad range of large-scale research campaigns from infectious disease treatment to next-generation materials development.
US Department of Energy, Advanced Scientific Computing

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Nov-2017
Scientific Reports
New routes to renewables: Sandia speeds transformation of biofuel waste into wealth
A Sandia National Laboratories-led team has demonstrated faster, more efficient ways to turn discarded plant matter into chemicals worth billions.

Contact: Jules Bernstein
jberns@sandia.gov
925-294-2612
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 31-Oct-2017
NREL, University of Washington scientists elevate quantum dot solar cell world record
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory established a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells, at 13.4 percent.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2017
Energy & Environmental Science
NREL research yields significant thermoelectric performance
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reported significant advances in the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors based on carbon nanotube thin films that could be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2017
Nature Ecology & Evolution
White rot fungi's size explained by breadth of gene families involved
Armillaria fungi are among the most devastating fungal pathogens, causing root rot disease in more than 500 plant species found in forests, parks and vineyards. As white rot fungi, they are capable of breaking down all components of plant cell walls, a capability that interests bioenergy researchers. In Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team analyzed and compared four Armillaria fungal genomes with those of related fungi to better understand the evolution of Armillaria's abilities.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 20-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Cool roofs have water saving benefits too
The energy and climate benefits of cool roofs have been well established: By reflecting rather than absorbing the sun's energy, light-colored roofs keep buildings, cities, and even the entire planet cooler. Now a new study by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found that cool roofs can also save water by reducing how much is needed for urban irrigation.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Oct-2017
Screening for disease or toxins in a drop of blood
Imagine being able to quickly and accurately screen for diseases or chemical contaminants in a tiny drop of blood. Berkeley Lab scientist Daojing Wang and others have developed a multinozzle emitter array (MEA), a silicon chip that can dramatically shorten the time it takes to identify proteins, peptides, and other molecular components within small volumes of biological samples. This patented technology is now being commercialized by Newomics Inc., a company Wang launched to further develop the product and build a platform for personalized health care.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Oct-2017
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Researchers customize catalysts to boost product yields, decrease separation costs
For some crystalline catalysts, what you see on the surface is not always what you get in the bulk, according to two studies led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The investigators discovered that treating a complex oxide crystal with either heat or chemicals caused different atoms to segregate on the surface, i.e., surface reconstruction. Those differences created catalysts with dissimilar behaviors, which encouraged different reaction pathways and ultimately yielded distinct products.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
SimPath licenses novel ORNL system for enhanced synthetic biology
SimPath has licensed a novel cloning system developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that generates and assembles the biological building blocks necessary to synthetically bioengineer new medicines and fuels.
US Department of Energy, Biological and Environmental Research, Genomic Science Program; ORNL's Technology Innovation Program

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
NIH awards $6.5 million to Berkeley Lab for augmenting structural biology research
The NIH has awarded $6.5 million to Berkeley Lab to integrate existing synchrotron structural biology resources to better serve researchers. The grant will establish a center based at the Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) called ALS-ENABLE that will guide users through the most appropriate routes for answering their specific biological questions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have performed neutron structural analysis of a vitamin B6-dependent protein, potentially opening avenues for new antibiotics and drugs to battle diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria and diabetes. Specifically, the team used neutron crystallography to study the location of hydrogen atoms in aspartate aminotransferase, or AAT, an enzyme vital to the metabolism of certain amino acids.
Department of Energy's Office of Science, ORNL's Center for Structural Molecular Biology

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Oct-2017
Physical Review Letters
International team reconstructs nanoscale virus features from correlations of scattered X-rays
Berkeley Lab researchers contributed key algorithms which helped scientists achieve a goal first proposed more than 40 years ago -- using angular correlations of X-ray snapshots from non-crystalline molecules to determine the 3-D structure of important biological objects.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Tracking the viral parasites of giant viruses over time
In freshwater lakes, microbes regulate the flow of carbon and determine if the bodies of water serve as carbon sinks or carbon sources. Viruses exist amidst all bacteria, usually in a 10-fold excess and include virophages which live in giant viruses and use their machinery to replicate and spread. Reported in Nature Communications, researchers at The Ohio State University and the DOE Joint Genome Institute have effectively doubled the number of known virophages.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
NREL evaluates charging infrastructure needs for growing fleet of electric vehicles
A new study from the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory quantifies how much charging infrastructure would be needed in the United States to support various market growth scenarios for plug-in electric vehicles.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2017
Cell
Liverwort genes and land plant evolution
The common liverwort is a living link to the transition from marine algae to land plants. In the Oct. 5, 2017 issue of Cell, an international team including researchers at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, analyzed the genome sequence of the common liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) to identify genes and gene families that were deemed crucial to plant evolution and have been conserved over millions of years and across plant lineages.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Nature Methods
Benchmarking computational methods for metagenomes
To tackle assembling metagenomes, then binning these consensus regions into genome bins, and finally conducting taxonomic profiling, analysts around the world have developed an array of different computational tools, but until now there was a lack of consensus on how to evaluate their performance. In Nature Methods, a team including DOE JGI researchers described the results of the Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) Challenge, the first-ever, community-organized benchmarking assessment of computational tools for metagenomes.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Surrounded by potential: New science in converting biomass
To take full advantage of biomass, lignin needs to be processed into usable components along with the plant cellulose. Currently, that process requires an acid plus high heat, or pyrolysis -- treating with high heat in the absence of oxygen. Besides being energy-consuming processing methods, the results are less than optimal. Ames Laboratory scientists are working to develop a method to deconstruct lignin in a way that is economically feasible and into stable, readily useful components.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Nature Energy
NREL, Johns Hopkins develop method to quantify life cycle land use of natural gas
A case study of the Barnett Shale region in Texas, where hydraulic fracturing was first implemented, for the first time provides quantifiable information on the life cycle land use of generating electricity from natural gas based on physical measurements instead of using assumptions and averages that were previously used for evaluation.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Oct-2017
Painless microneedles extract fluid for wearable sensors for soldiers, athletes
Microneedles are the first way to extract large volumes of pure interstitial fluid. This fluid can be used to track the physical conditions of athletes, soldiers, even diabetics but could also aid in diagnosing other diseases, including cancer.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 28-Sep-2017
Mycologia
Hunt is over for one of the 'top 50 most-wanted fungi'
Scientists from several institutions including Los Alamos National Laboratory have characterized a sample of 'mystery' fungus collected in North Carolina and found its home in the fungal tree of life.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, US Department of Agriculture, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Michigan State University AgBioResearch, Western Illinois University, and others

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 130.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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