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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 163.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 16-Nov-2017
Science
Detailed view of immune proteins could lead to new pathogen-defense strategies
Biologists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley used cryo-EM to resolve the structure of a ring of proteins used by the immune system to summon support when under attack, providing new insight into potential strategies for protection from pathogens. The researchers captured the high-resolution image of a protein ring, called an inflammasome, as it was bound to flagellin, a protein from the whiplike tail used by bacteria to propel themselves forward.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Nov-2017
Cell Host & Microbe
Unlocking the secrets of Ebola
Scientists have identified a set of biomarkers that indicate which patients infected with the Ebola virus are most at risk of dying from the disease. The results come from one of the most in-depth studies ever of blood samples from patients with Ebola. Researchers found 11 biomarkers that distinguish fatal infections from non-fatal ones and two that, when screened for early upon symptom onset, accurately predict which patients are likely to die.
Japanese Health and Labor Sciences Research Grant, Ministry of Education, Cultures, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, Emerging/Re-emerging Infectious Diseases Project of Japan, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and others

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Nov-2017
Nature Microbiology
To find new biofuel enzymes, it can take a microbial village
In search of new plant enzymes? Try looking in compost. Researchers at JBEI have demonstrated the importance of microbial communities as a source of stable enzymes that could be used to convert plants to biofuels. This approach yields robust enzymes that researchers can't easily obtain from isolates.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Nov-2017
Electrochimica Acta
Fuel cell X-ray study details effects of temperature and moisture on performance
To find the right balance of moisture and temperature in a specialized type of hydrogen fuel cell, Berkeley Lab scientists have used X-rays to explore the inner workings of its components at tiny scales.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2017
Physics of Plasmas
Plasma from lasers can shed light on cosmic rays, solar eruptions
A team of researchers led by PPPL physicist Will Fox recently used lasers to create conditions that mimic astrophysical behavior. The laboratory technique enables the study of outer-space-like plasma in a controlled and reproducible environment.
DOE/Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science, National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
609-243-3317
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Nov-2017
Scientific Reports
New routes to renewables: Sandia speeds transformation of biofuel waste into wealth
A Sandia National Laboratories-led team has demonstrated faster, more efficient ways to turn discarded plant matter into chemicals worth billions.

Contact: Jules Bernstein
jberns@sandia.gov
925-294-2612
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 1-Nov-2017
ACS Catalysis
One-step 3-D printing of catalysts developed at Ames Laboratory
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a 3-D printing process that creates a chemically active catalytic object in a single step, opening the door to more efficient ways to produce catalysts for complex chemical reactions in a wide scope of industries.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2017
ORNL's DelCul, Wirth named American Nuclear Society fellows
Two researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been elected fellows of the American Nuclear Society, a professional society that promotes the advancement and awareness of nuclear science and technology.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2017
NREL, University of Washington scientists elevate quantum dot solar cell world record
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory established a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells, at 13.4 percent.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2017
Energy & Environmental Science
NREL research yields significant thermoelectric performance
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reported significant advances in the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors based on carbon nanotube thin films that could be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2017
Nature Ecology & Evolution
White rot fungi's size explained by breadth of gene families involved
Armillaria fungi are among the most devastating fungal pathogens, causing root rot disease in more than 500 plant species found in forests, parks and vineyards. As white rot fungi, they are capable of breaking down all components of plant cell walls, a capability that interests bioenergy researchers. In Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team analyzed and compared four Armillaria fungal genomes with those of related fungi to better understand the evolution of Armillaria's abilities.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 30-Oct-2017
Robotics principles help Sandia wave energy converters better absorb power of ocean waves
Compared to wind and solar energy, wave energy has remained relatively expensive and hard to capture, but engineers from Sandia National Laboratories are working to change that by drawing inspiration from other industries. Sandia's engineering team has designed, modeled and tested a control system that doubles the amount of power a wave energy converter can absorb from ocean waves, making electricity produced from wave energy less expensive.
Department of Energy's Water Power Technologies Office

Contact: Kristen Meub
klmeub@sandia.gov
505-845-7215
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 26-Oct-2017
Science
Scientists get first close-ups of finger-like growths that trigger battery fires
Scientists from Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the first atomic-level images of finger-like growths called dendrites that can pierce the barrier between battery compartments and trigger short circuits or fires. Dendrites and the problems they cause have been a stumbling block on the road to developing new types of batteries that store more energy so electric cars, cell phones, laptops and other devices can go longer between charges.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Oct-2017
New fractal-like concentrating solar power receivers are better at absorbing sunlight
Sandia National Laboratories engineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers for small- to medium-scale use that are up to 20 percent more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology. The receivers were designed and studied as part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project and are also being applied to Sandia's work for the Solar Energy Research Institute for India and the United States, or SERIIUS.
US Department of Energy, Government of India

Contact: Kristen Meub
klmeub@sandia.gov
505-845-7215
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 19-Oct-2017
Chemistry of Materials
Scientists solve a magnesium mystery in rechargeable battery performance
A Berkeley Lab-led research team has discovered a surprising set of chemical reactions involving magnesium that degrade battery performance even before the battery can be charged up. The findings could steer the design of next-gen batteries.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
SimPath licenses novel ORNL system for enhanced synthetic biology
SimPath has licensed a novel cloning system developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that generates and assembles the biological building blocks necessary to synthetically bioengineer new medicines and fuels.
US Department of Energy, Biological and Environmental Research, Genomic Science Program; ORNL's Technology Innovation Program

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
Nature Nanotechnology
Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasers
One of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nanotech Team, the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or 'doped,' with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired laser light with less stimulation and energy loss.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Tracking the viral parasites of giant viruses over time
In freshwater lakes, microbes regulate the flow of carbon and determine if the bodies of water serve as carbon sinks or carbon sources. Viruses exist amidst all bacteria, usually in a 10-fold excess and include virophages which live in giant viruses and use their machinery to replicate and spread. Reported in Nature Communications, researchers at The Ohio State University and the DOE Joint Genome Institute have effectively doubled the number of known virophages.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
NREL evaluates charging infrastructure needs for growing fleet of electric vehicles
A new study from the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory quantifies how much charging infrastructure would be needed in the United States to support various market growth scenarios for plug-in electric vehicles.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2017
ACS Nano
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2017
A method developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory could protect connected and autonomous vehicles from possible network intrusion. A new ORNL technique makes ultrafast measurements using atomic force microscopy.
DOE/Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Oct-2017
IEEE Computers in Science and Engineering
Assessing regional earthquake risk and hazards in the age of exascale
Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore Lab and UC Davis are building the first-ever end-to-end simulation code to precisely capture the geology and physics of regional earthquakes, and how the shaking impacts buildings.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Nature Methods
Benchmarking computational methods for metagenomes
To tackle assembling metagenomes, then binning these consensus regions into genome bins, and finally conducting taxonomic profiling, analysts around the world have developed an array of different computational tools, but until now there was a lack of consensus on how to evaluate their performance. In Nature Methods, a team including DOE JGI researchers described the results of the Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) Challenge, the first-ever, community-organized benchmarking assessment of computational tools for metagenomes.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Nature Energy
NREL, Johns Hopkins develop method to quantify life cycle land use of natural gas
A case study of the Barnett Shale region in Texas, where hydraulic fracturing was first implemented, for the first time provides quantifiable information on the life cycle land use of generating electricity from natural gas based on physical measurements instead of using assumptions and averages that were previously used for evaluation.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Journal of the American Chemical Society
New efficient catalyst for key step in artificial photosynthesis
Chemists have designed a new 'single-site' catalyst that speeds up the rate of a key step in artificial photosynthesis. It's the first to match the efficiency of the catalytic sites that drive this reaction in nature and could greatly improve the potential for making efficient solar-to-fuel conversion devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Sep-2017
Plant Physiology
With extra sugar, leaves get fat too
Eat too much without exercising and you'll probably put on a few pounds. As it turns out, plant leaves do something similar. A new study shows that retaining sugars in plant leaves can make them get fat too. In plants, this extra fat accumulation could be a good thing. It could help turn plants into factories for making biofuels and other useful chemicals.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 163.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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