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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 237.

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Public Release: 23-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Ames Laboratory, UConn discover superconductor with bounce
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has discovered extreme 'bounce,' or super-elastic shape-memory properties in a material that could be applied for use as an actuator in the harshest of conditions, such as outer space, and might be the first in a whole new class of shape memory materials.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2017
Two ORNL-led research teams receive $10.5 million to advance quantum computing for science
DOE's Office of Science has awarded two research teams, each headed by a member of ORNL's Quantum Information Science Group, more than $10 million over 5 years to both assess the feasibility of quantum architectures in addressing big science problems and to develop algorithms capable of harnessing the massive power predicted of quantum computing systems. The two projects are intended to work in concert to ensure synergy across DOE's quantum computing research spectrum and maximize mutual benefits.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Scott Jones
jonesg@ornl.gov
865-241-6491
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Oct-2017
Sandia Labs team continues to quantify fatigue using wearables
The R2R WATCH (Rim-to-Rim Wearables at the Canyon for Health) study, a collaborative project between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 19-Oct-2017
Chemistry of Materials
Scientists solve a magnesium mystery in rechargeable battery performance
A Berkeley Lab-led research team has discovered a surprising set of chemical reactions involving magnesium that degrade battery performance even before the battery can be charged up. The findings could steer the design of next-gen batteries.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Oct-2017
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Researchers customize catalysts to boost product yields, decrease separation costs
For some crystalline catalysts, what you see on the surface is not always what you get in the bulk, according to two studies led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The investigators discovered that treating a complex oxide crystal with either heat or chemicals caused different atoms to segregate on the surface, i.e., surface reconstruction. Those differences created catalysts with dissimilar behaviors, which encouraged different reaction pathways and ultimately yielded distinct products.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
ESnet's science DMZ design could help transfer, protect medical research data
As medicine becomes more data-intensive, Berkeley Lab & ESnet's Medical Science DMZ eyed as secure solution for transferring data.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
Nature
Decoding the origin of heavy elements in the light from a neutron star merger
On Aug. 17, scientists around the globe were treated to near-simultaneous observations by separate instruments: One set of Earth-based detectors measured the signature of a cataclysmic event sending ripples through the fabric of space-time, and a space-based detector measured the gamma-ray signature of a high-energy outburst emanating from the same region of the sky.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2017
Physical Review Letters
Spin current detection in quantum materials unlocks potential for alternative electronics
A new method that precisely measures the mysterious behavior and magnetic properties of electrons flowing across the surface of quantum materials could open a path to next-generation electronics. A team of scientists has developed an innovative microscopy technique to detect the spin of electrons in topological insulators, a new kind of quantum material that could be used in applications such as spintronics and quantum computing.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2017
Strangpresse licenses ORNL extruder tech for high-volume additive manufacturing
Ohio-based Strangpresse has exclusively licensed additive manufacturing-related extruder technology from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that can quickly print hundreds of pounds of polymer material.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Oct-2017
Proceedings of the Combustion Institute
Sandia's Direct Numerical Simulations enhance combustion efficiency, reduces pollution
Sandia researchers use Direct Numerical Simulations to enhance efficiency, reduce pollution in diesel engines.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 12-Oct-2017
Physical Review Letters
International team reconstructs nanoscale virus features from correlations of scattered X-rays
Berkeley Lab researchers contributed key algorithms which helped scientists achieve a goal first proposed more than 40 years ago -- using angular correlations of X-ray snapshots from non-crystalline molecules to determine the 3-D structure of important biological objects.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Oct-2017
Ames Lab receives $392,000 in funding to commercialize gas atomization design
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has received $392,000 in funding to commercialize a gas atomization nozzle design used to produce metal powders for manufacturing. In addition, the Laboratory will contribute in-kind matching funds of equal value for the project from private sector partner Ampal, Inc., a part of the United States Metal Powders group of companies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Oct-2017
Exploring the exotic world of quarks and gluons at the dawn of the exascale
As nuclear physicists delve ever deeper into the heart of matter, they require the tools to reveal the next layer of nature's secrets. Nowhere is that more true than in computational nuclear physics. A new research effort led by theorists at DOE's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is now preparing for the next big leap forward in their studies thanks to funding under the 2017 SciDAC Awards for Computational Nuclear Physics.
Department of Energy

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 11-Oct-2017
Nature
Injecting electrons jolts 2-D structure into new atomic pattern
The same electrostatic charge that can make hair stand on end and attach balloons to clothing could be an efficient way to drive atomically thin electronic memory devices of the future, according to a new Berkeley Lab study. Scientists have found a way to reversibly change the atomic structure of a 2-D material by injecting it with electrons. The process uses far less energy than current methods for changing the configuration of a material's structure.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Forget about it
Inspired by human forgetfulness -- how our brains discard unnecessary data to make room for new information -- scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and three universities, conducted a recent study that combined supercomputer simulation and X-ray characterization of a material that gradually 'forgets.' This could one day be used for advanced bio-inspired computing.
US Army Research Office, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, C-SPIN, Intel Corporation, Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
NREL evaluates charging infrastructure needs for growing fleet of electric vehicles
A new study from the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory quantifies how much charging infrastructure would be needed in the United States to support various market growth scenarios for plug-in electric vehicles.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Machine learning translates 'hidden' information to reveal chemistry in action
Scientists have developed a new way to capture the details of chemistry choreography as it happens. The method -- which relies on computers that have learned to recognize hidden signs of the steps -- should help them improve the performance of catalysts to drive reactions toward desired products faster.
DOE Office of Science and Brookhaven Lab's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2017
ACS Nano
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2017
A method developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory could protect connected and autonomous vehicles from possible network intrusion. A new ORNL technique makes ultrafast measurements using atomic force microscopy.
DOE/Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Surrounded by potential: New science in converting biomass
To take full advantage of biomass, lignin needs to be processed into usable components along with the plant cellulose. Currently, that process requires an acid plus high heat, or pyrolysis -- treating with high heat in the absence of oxygen. Besides being energy-consuming processing methods, the results are less than optimal. Ames Laboratory scientists are working to develop a method to deconstruct lignin in a way that is economically feasible and into stable, readily useful components.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2017
Nature Energy
NREL, Johns Hopkins develop method to quantify life cycle land use of natural gas
A case study of the Barnett Shale region in Texas, where hydraulic fracturing was first implemented, for the first time provides quantifiable information on the life cycle land use of generating electricity from natural gas based on physical measurements instead of using assumptions and averages that were previously used for evaluation.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Oct-2017
Painless microneedles extract fluid for wearable sensors for soldiers, athletes
Microneedles are the first way to extract large volumes of pure interstitial fluid. This fluid can be used to track the physical conditions of athletes, soldiers, even diabetics but could also aid in diagnosing other diseases, including cancer.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 27-Sep-2017
Nature
Atomistic simulations go the distance on metal strength
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have dived down to the atomic scale to resolve every 'jiggle and wiggle' of atomic motion that underlies metal strength.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Sep-2017
2017 SAE International World Congress in Detroit
Turbocharging engine design
Researchers at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have moved the development process into the passing lane. For the first time, Argonne's scientists and engineers pinpointed engine designs for a given fuel using the Mira supercomputer at the heart of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

Contact: Karen Ehlers
kehlers@anl.gov
630-252-6020
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Sep-2017
Berkeley Lab aims to strengthen the cybersecurity of the grid
As the US electricity grid continues to modernize, it will mean things like better reliability and resilience and lower environmental impacts, as well as new computing and communications technologies to monitor and manage the increasing number of devices that connect to the grid. However, that enhanced connectivity for grid operators and consumers also opens the door to hackers.
Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Sep-2017
A quantum computer to tackle fundamental science problems
Two Berkeley Lab teams will receive Department of Energy funding to develop near-term quantum computing platforms and tools to be used for scientific discovery in the chemical sciences. One team will develop novel algorithms, compiling techniques and scheduling tools, while the other team will design prototype four- and eight-qubit processors to compute these new algorithms.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 237.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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