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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 113.

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Public Release: 1-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Where the rains come from
Intense storms have become more frequent and longer-lasting in the Great Plains and Midwest in the last 35 years. What has fueled these storms? The temperature difference between the Southern Great Plains and the Atlantic Ocean produces winds that carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains, according to a new study in Nature Communications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Nov-2016
Nature Microbiology
Genes, early environment sculpt the gut microbiome
Genetics and birthplace have a big effect on the make-up of the microbial community in the gut, according to research published Nov. 28. in the journal Nature Microbiology. The findings by a team of scientists from two Department of Energy laboratories represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.
Office of Naval Research, DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2016
Energy & Environmental Science
Argonne researchers study how reflectivity of biofuel crops impacts climate
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have conducted a detailed study of the albedo (reflectivity) effects of converting land to grow biofuel crops. Based on changes in albedo alone, their findings reveal that greenhouse gas emissions in land use change scenarios represent a net warming effect for ethanol made from miscanthus grass and switchgrass, but a net cooling effect for ethanol made from corn
United States Department of Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2016
Cell Reports
3-D imaging technique maps migration of DNA-carrying material at the center of cells
Scientists have produced detailed 3-D visualizations that show an unexpected connectivity in the genetic material at the center of cells, providing a new understanding of a cell's evolving architecture.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2016
Science
Engineering a more efficient system for harnessing carbon dioxide
A team from the Max-Planck-Institute (MPI) for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg, Germany, by tapping the DNA synthesis expertise of the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), has reverse engineered a biosynthetic pathway for more effective carbon fixation. This novel pathway is based on a new CO2-fixing enzyme that is nearly 20 times faster than the most prevalent enzyme in nature responsible for capturing CO2 in plants by using sunlight as energy.
European Research Council, Swiss National Science Foundation, ETH Zurich, Max-Planck-Society, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 8-Nov-2016
Brookhaven's Robert McGraw receives AS&T's Outstanding Publication Award from AAAR
Robert McGraw's AS&T Outstanding Publication Award from the American Association for Aerosol Research recognizes the novel method he developed nearly 20 years ago to mathematically characterize how the distribution of tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols evolves over time.
U.S. Department of Energy

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Nov-2016
Nature Communications
Study: Carbon-hungry plants impede growth rate of atmospheric CO2 
New findings suggest the rate at which CO2 is accumulating in the atmosphere has plateaued in recent years because Earth's vegetation is grabbing more carbon from the air than in previous decades. The findings are based on extensive ground and atmospheric observations of CO2, satellite measurements of vegetation, and computer modeling.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Nov-2016
ORNL wins 7 R&D 100 Awards
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have received seven R&D 100 Awards in recognition of their significant advancements in science and technology.

Contact: Sean Simoneau
simoneausm@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2016
2017 DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Science Program allocations announced
The organisms and ecosystems highlighted in the 37 projects selected for the 2017 Community Science Program (CSP) of the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, 'exploit DOE JGI's experimental and analytical 'omics' capabilities and build our portfolio in key focus areas' and reflect the breadth and depth of interests researchers are exploring to find solutions to energy and environmental challenges.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Fuel from sewage is the future -- and it's closer than you think
Sewage to fuel: PNNL research takes this renewable resource closer to reality.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Nov-2016
State's 3 largest public research institutions to increase collaboration
The state's three largest public research institutions have signed a Memorandum of Understanding, which expresses the intent of the parties to increase research collaborations on complex challenges and provide additional research and training opportunities for students in the state. The memorandum was signed recently by leaders at the University of Washington, Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Nov-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NREL researchers discover how a bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, utilizes both CO2 and cellulose
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory made the surprise discovery that a metabolic pathway to take up CO2 exists and functions in a microorganism capable of breaking down and fermenting cellulosic biomass to produce biofuels including hydrogen and hydrocarbons.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2016
Nature Geoscience
Clouds are impeding global warming... for now
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have identified a mechanism that causes low clouds -- and their influence on Earth's energy balance -- to respond differently to global warming depending on their spatial pattern.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Oct-2016
Nature Microbiology
Deep down fracking wells, microbial communities thrive
Microbes have a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in fracking wells. New finding help scientists understand what is happening inside fracking wells and could offer insight into processes such as corrosion and methane production.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
New bacteria groups, and stunning diversity, discovered underground
One of the most detailed genomic studies of any ecosystem to date has revealed an underground world of stunning microbial diversity, and added dozens of new branches to the tree of life. The bacterial bonanza comes from scientists who reconstructed the genomes of more than 2,500 microbes from sediment and groundwater samples collected at an aquifer in Colorado.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Oct-2016
Nature
Amazon rainstorms transport atmospheric particles for cloud formation
Understanding how tiny particles emitted by cars and factories affect Earth's climate requires accurate climate modeling and the ability to quantify the effects of these pollutant particles vs. particles naturally present in the atmosphere. To better understand the baseline, scientists describe how they tracked particles in the largely pristine atmosphere over the Amazon rainforest -- effectively turning back the clock a few hundred years.
US Department of Energy, Amazonas State Research Foundation, São Paulo Research Foundation, Brazil Scientific Mobility Program, Max Planck Society, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Oct-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Unraveling the science behind biomass breakdown
Using the Titan supercomputer, an ORNL team created models of up to 330,000 atoms that led to the discovery of a THF-water cosolvent phase separation on the faces of crystalline cellulose fiber.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Gedenk
gedenked@ornl.gov
865-241-5497
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2016
Wave energy researchers dive deep to advance clean energy source
One of the biggest untapped clean energy sources on the planet -- wave energy -- could one day power millions of homes across the US. But more than a century after the first tests of the power of ocean waves, it is still one of the hardest energy sources to capture. Now, engineers at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting the largest model-scale wave energy testing of its kind to improve the performance of wave-energy converters.

Contact: Rebecca Brock
rabrock@sandia.gov
505-844-7772
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 11-Oct-2016
Three NREL technologies named as finalists for R&D 100 Awards
Two technologies developed by researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and a third developed through a collaboration between Wolfspeed, NREL, Toyota, and the University of Arkansas' National Center for Reliable Electric Power Transmission, have been named finalists by R&D Magazine for the coveted 2016 R&D 100 Awards.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Oct-2016
NREL to lead one exascale computing project, support three others
Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory will lead an effort to model the complex and turbulent flow of wind through large wind plants as part of DOE's Exascale Computing Project, which is gearing up US computational capabilities to prepare for the next generation of supercomputers. NREL will also provide support to three projects related to combustion science, urban systems, and power grid dynamics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Oct-2016
NREL releases updated baseline of cost and performance data for electricity generation technologies
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released the 2016 Annual Technology Baseline. In addition to updated data for utility-scale renewable and conventional energy technologies, this year's version includes cost and performance data for residential and commercial rooftop photovoltaics systems.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Oct-2016
NREL supercomputing model provides insights from higher wind and solar generation in the eastern power grid
A new study from the United States Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory used high-performance computing capabilities and innovative visualization tools to model, in unprecedented detail, how the power grid of the eastern United States could operationally accommodate higher levels of wind and solar photovoltaic generation. The analysis considered scenarios of up to 30 percent annual penetration of wind and solar.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Oct-2016
Hydrogen-powered passenger ferry in San Francisco Bay is possible, says Sandia study
Nearly two years ago, Sandia National Laboratories researchers Joe Pratt and Lennie Klebanoff set out to answer one not-so-simple question: is it feasible to build and operate a high-speed passenger ferry solely powered by hydrogen fuel cells? The answer is yes. The details behind that answer are in a recent report, 'Feasibility of the SF-BREEZE: a Zero Emission, Hydrogen Fuel Cell High Speed Passenger Ferry.'

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 4-Oct-2016
Water Research
New technology helps pinpoint sources of water contamination
When the local water management agency closes your favorite beach due to unhealthy water quality, how reliable are the tests they base their decisions on? As it turns out, those tests, as well as the standards behind them, have not been updated in decades. Now scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a highly accurate, DNA-based method to detect and distinguish sources of microbial contamination in water.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Sep-2016
10 new projects to be supported under Joint DOE user facility initiative
The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory have accepted 10 projects submitted during the 2017 call for proposals for their joint 'Facilities Integrating Collaborations for User Science' (FICUS) initiative. The accepted proposals will begin on Oct. 1, 2016 and fall under the following focused topic areas: Plant-Microbe Interactions, Biofuels and Bioproducts, and Biogeochemistry of Select Inorganics.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Showing releases 1-25 out of 113.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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