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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-45 out of 45.

<< < 1 | 2

Public Release: 28-Nov-2016
Nature Microbiology
Genes, early environment sculpt the gut microbiome
Genetics and birthplace have a big effect on the make-up of the microbial community in the gut, according to research published Nov. 28. in the journal Nature Microbiology. The findings by a team of scientists from two Department of Energy laboratories represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.
Office of Naval Research, DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Nov-2016
Neuron
Global brain initiatives generate tsunami of neuroscience data
New technologies are giving researchers unprecedented opportunities to explore how the brain processes, utilizes, stores and retrieves information. But, without a coherent strategy to analyze, manage and understand the data generated by these new tools, advancements in the field will be limited. Berkeley Lab researchers and their collaborators offer a plan to overcome these big data challenges.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2016
ACS Infectious Diseases
Supercomputer simulations help develop new approach to fight antibiotic resistance
Supercomputer simulations at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have played a key role in discovering a new class of drug candidates that hold promise to combat antibiotic resistance. In a study led by the University of Oklahoma with ORNL, the University of Tennessee and Saint Louis University, lab experiments were combined with supercomputer modeling to identify molecules that boost antibiotics' effect on disease-causing bacteria.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2016
Cell Reports
3-D imaging technique maps migration of DNA-carrying material at the center of cells
Scientists have produced detailed 3-D visualizations that show an unexpected connectivity in the genetic material at the center of cells, providing a new understanding of a cell's evolving architecture.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Nov-2016
Accelerating cancer research with deep learning
Using the Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at ORNL, Tourassi's team applied deep learning to extract useful information from cancer pathology reports, a foundational element of cancer surveillance. Working with modest datasets, the team obtained preliminary findings that demonstrate deep learning's potential for cancer surveillance.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
hinesjd@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2016
Science
Mutational signatures mark cancer's smoking gun
A broad computational study of cancer genome sequences identifies telltale mutational signatures associated with smoking tobacco and demonstrates, for the first time, that smoking increases cancer risk by causing somatic mutations in tissues directly and indirectly exposed to tobacco smoke.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Oct-2016
PPPL inventors honored for device to create isotope vital for diagnosing diseases
Scientists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have received the 2016 Edison Patent Award for their invention of an on-demand method to create a badly needed isotope used in medical imaging devices to diagnose diseases such as cancer and heart disease.

Contact: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
jjackson@pppl.gov
609-243-2757
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2016
Ames Laboratory senior scientist Paul C. Canfield receives James C. McGroddy Prize
Professor Paul C. Canfield, a senior scientist at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory has been awarded the James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials by the American Physical Society (APS).

Contact: Steve
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Oct-2016
IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
Brain modulyzer provides interactive window into the brain
A new tool developed at Berkeley Lab allows researchers to interactively explore the hierarchical processes that happen in the brain when it is resting or performing tasks. Scientists also hope that the tool can shed some light on how neurological diseases like Alzheimer's spread throughout the brain.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2016
Nature Communications
For normal heart function, look beyond the genes
Berkeley Lab researchers have compiled a comprehensive genome-wide map of more than 80,000 enhancers considered relevant to human heart development and function. They went on to test two of the enhancers in mice, showing that when the enhancers were missing, the heart worked abnormally. The finding bolsters the importance of DNA segments once considered 'junk.'
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
IEEE International Conference on Rebooting Computing
Turning to the brain to reboot computing
Computation is stuck in a rut. The integrated circuits that powered the past 50 years of technological revolution are reaching their physical limits. This predicament has computer scientists scrambling for new ideas. Researchers from Sandia National Laboratories will present three papers at the IEEE International Conference on Rebooting Computing held Oct. 17-19, highlighting the breadth of potential non-traditional neural computing applications.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Transformational X-ray project takes a step forward
A proposed upgrade to the Advanced Light Source -- which would provide new views of materials and chemistry at the nanoscale with X-ray beams up to 1,000 times brighter than possible now -- has cleared the first step in a Department of Energy approval process. The upgrade would enable new explorations of chemical reactions, battery performance, and biological processes.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016
Science Advances
Study yields new knowledge about materials for ultrasound and other applications
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their research partners have used neutron scattering to discover the key to piezoelectric excellence in the newer materials, which are called relaxor-based ferroelectrics. (A ferroelectric material has electrical polarization that is reversed by application of an electric field.) Their findings, published online in the journal Science Advances, may provide knowledge needed to accelerate the design of functional materials for diverse applications.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Study finds potential new biomarker for cancer patient prognosis
Berkeley Lab researchers linked the overexpression of 14 genes related to cell division to cancer patients' prognosis and response to specific treatments. The findings could be used to develop a biomarker that doctors and patients use to make better informed decisions in clinical settings.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2016
Science
A new way to display the 3-D structure of molecules
Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley Researchers have developed nanoscale display cases that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment
A new study at Los Alamos National Laboratory and in collaboration with Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource greatly improves scientists' understanding of the element actinium. The insights could support innovation in creating new classes of anticancer drugs.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Aug-2016
Nature
Unveiled: Earth's viral diversity
Plumbing the Earth's microbial diversity requires learning more about the poorly-studied relationships between microbes and the viruses that infect them, impacting their abilities to regulate global cycles. DOE JGI researchers utilized the largest collection of assembled metagenomic datasets to uncover over 125,000 partial and complete viral genomes. This single effort increases the number of known viral genes by a factor of 16, and provides researchers with a unique resource of viral sequence information.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 3-Aug-2016
Analytical Chemistry
Researchers at Sandia, Northeastern develop method to study critical HIV protein
Mike Kent, a researcher in Sandia National Laboratories' Biological and Engineering Sciences Center, is studying a protein called Nef involved in HIV progression to AIDS with the ultimate goal of blocking it. He and his collaborators have developed a new hybrid method to study this HIV protein that compromises the immune system. The method also could work on many other proteins that damage cellular processes and cause diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
Science Advances
Researchers find molecular switch that triggers bacterial pathogenicity
A new study led by scientists at Berkeley Lab has revealed that the supercoiling of bacterial chromosomes around histone-like proteins can trigger the expression of genes that make the microbe invasive. The discovery could provide a new target for the development of drugs to prevent or treat bacterial infection.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jul-2016
Environmental Science & Technology
All e-cigarettes emit harmful chemicals, but some emit more than others
While previous studies have found that electronic cigarettes emit toxic compounds, a new study from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has pinpointed the source of these emissions and shown how factors such as the temperature, type, and age of the device play a role in emission levels, information that could be valuable to both manufacturers and regulators seeking to minimize the health impacts of these increasingly popular devices.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-45 out of 45.

<< < 1 | 2

 

 

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