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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 275.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 26-Jun-2017
Nature Physics
2-D material's traits could send electronics R&D spinning in new directions
Researchers created an atomically thin material at Berkeley Lab and used X-rays to measure its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as 'spintronics.'

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2017
Chemistry of Materials
Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered that they could functionalize magnetic materials through a thoroughly unlikely method, by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2017
Cut US commercial building energy use 29 percent with widespread controls
The US could slash its energy use by the equivalent of what is currently used by 12 to 15 million Americans if commercial buildings fully used energy-efficiency controls nationwide.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jun-2017
Science
New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen production
Scientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.
DOE/Office of Science, National Basic Research Program of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jun-2017
Nature Materials
Sound waves direct particles to self-assemble, self-heal
Berkeley Lab scientists have demonstrated how floating particles will assemble and synchronize in response to acoustic waves. Their simple experiment provides a new framework for studying how seemingly lifelike behaviors emerge in response to external forces. The work could help address fundamental questions about energy dissipation and non-equilibrium thermodynamics.
Office of Naval Research, Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2017
Nature Physics
Nickel for thought: Compound shows potential for high-temperature superconductivity
Argonne researchers have identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The project combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2017
Chemistry of Materials
Development of low-dimensional nanomaterials could revolutionize future technologies
Javier Vela, scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, believes improvements in computer processors, TV displays and solar cells will come from scientific advancements in the synthesis of low-dimensional nanomaterials.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2017
US-China collaboration makes excellent start in optimizing lithium to control plasma
For fusion to generate substantial energy, the ultra-hot plasma that fuels fusion reactions must remain stable and kept from cooling. Researchers have recently shown lithium, a soft, silver-white metal, to be effective in both respects during path-setting US-Chinese experiments on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in Hefei, China.
US Department of Energy, China's National Magnetic Fusion Science Program, China's National Nature Science Foundation, and China's A3 Foresight Program

Contact: Rajesh Maingi
rmaingi@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Nano Energy
A seaweed derivative could be just what lithium-sulfur batteries need
Lithium-sulfur batteries have great potential as a low-cost, high-energy, energy source for both vehicle and grid applications. However, they suffer from significant capacity fading. Now scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have made a surprising discovery that could fix this problem.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Science Advances
NREL-led research effort creates new alloys, phase diagram
A multi-institutional team led by the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered a way to create new alloys that could form the basis of next-generation semiconductors.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Science
Neutrons zero in on the elusive magnetic Majorana fermion
Neutron scattering has revealed in unprecedented detail new insights into the exotic magnetic behavior of a material that could pave the way for quantum calculations far beyond the limits of a computer's binary code. A research team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has confirmed magnetic signatures likely related to Majorana fermions -- elusive particles that could be the basis for a quantum bit, or qubit, in a 2-D graphene-like material, alpha-ruthenium trichloride.
DOE/Basic Energy Sciences, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DAAD

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Nano Letters
X-ray study reveals way to control molecular vibrations that transmit heat
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new way to track dynamic molecular features in soft materials, including the high-frequency molecular vibrations that transmit waves of heat, sound, and other forms of energy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jun-2017
Eck Industries exclusively licenses cerium-aluminum alloy co-developed by ORNL
Wisconsin's Eck Industries has signed an exclusive license for the commercialization of a cerium-aluminum (Ce-Al) alloy co-developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is ideal for creating lightweight, strong components for advanced vehicles and airplanes.

Contact: Stephanie Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2017
Follow the fantastic voyage of the ICARUS neutrino detector
The ICARUS neutrino detector, the largest of its kind, will make its way across the ocean to Fermilab this summer, where it will join the hunt for sterile neutrinos.
US Department of Energy, CERN, Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jun-2017
Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2017
ORNL developed an efficient, economical approach to locate petroleum- and natural gas-rich shale; an ORNL-led team discovered an electrochemical and ferroelectric link in ultrathin crystalline films, explaining a decade of anomalous behavior; Dallas-based Momentum Technologies non-exclusively licensed ORNL's 3-D-printed magnets made from recycled materials; ORNL's 'lucky finding' led to simple synthesis of ordered mesoporous materials from plants; team develops 3-D-printed heat exchanger for power plants that achieved 500 percent thermal conductivity increase using novel composites.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2017
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Scientists design molecular system for artificial photosynthesis
A molecular system for artificial photosynthesis is designed to mimic key functions of the photosynthetic center in green plants -- light absorption, charge separation, and catalysis -- to convert solar energy into chemical energy stored by hydrogen fuel.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jun-2017
Science
Rover findings indicate stratified lake on ancient Mars
A long-lasting lake on ancient Mars provided stable environmental conditions that differed significantly from one part of the lake to another, according to a comprehensive look at findings from the first three-and-a-half years of NASA's Curiosity rover mission.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jun-2017
Muon magnet's moment has arrived
On May 31, the 50-foot-wide superconducting electromagnet at the center of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab saw its first beam of muon particles from Fermilab's accelerators, kicking off a three-year effort to measure just what happens to those particles when placed in a stunningly precise magnetic field. The answer could rewrite scientists' picture of the universe and how it works.
Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 31-May-2017
JSA names co-recipients of its 2017 Outstanding Nuclear Physicist Prize
Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, announced today that Charles Perdrisat and Charles Sinclair are the recipients of the 2017 Outstanding Nuclear Physicist Prize. The 2017 JSA Outstanding Nuclear Physicist Award is jointly awarded to Charles Perdrisat for his pioneering implementation of the polarization transfer technique to determine proton elastic form factors, and to Charles Sinclair for his crucial development of polarized electron beam technology, which made such measurements, and many others, possible.
Jefferson Science Associates, LLC

Contact: Elizabeth L. Lawson
elawson@sura.org
202-408-2410
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 31-May-2017
Nature
The world's most powerful X-ray laser beam creates 'molecular black hole'
When scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory focused the full intensity of the world's most powerful X-ray laser on a small molecule, they got a surprise: a single laser pulse stripped all but a few electrons out of the molecule's biggest atom from the inside out, leaving a void that started pulling in electrons from the rest of the molecule, like a black hole gobbling a spiraling disk of matter.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 30-May-2017
Physical Review Letters
Heavy particles get caught up in the flow
By teasing out signatures of particles that decay just tenths of a millimeter from the center of a trillion-degree fireball that mimics the early universe, nuclear physicists smashing atoms at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are revealing new details about the fundamental particles that make up our world.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-May-2017
Geophysical Research Letters
'Halos' discovered on Mars widen time frame for potential life
Lighter-toned bedrock that surrounds fractures and comprises high concentrations of silica -- called 'halos' -- has been found in Gale crater on Mars, indicating that the planet had liquid water much longer than previously believed.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-May-2017
Fusion Engineering and Design
Physicists discover that lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance
A team of physicists has discovered that a coating of lithium oxide on the inside of fusion machines known as tokamaks absorbs as much deuterium as pure lithium does.
Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
Biochemistry
Insight into enzyme's 3-D structure could cut biofuel costs
Using neutron crystallography, a Los Alamos research team has mapped the three-dimensional structure of a protein that breaks down polysaccharides, such as the fibrous cellulose of grasses and woody plants, a finding that could help bring down the cost of creating biofuels.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
ORNL welcomes Innovation Crossroads entrepreneurial research fellows
Oak Ridge National Laboratory today welcomed the first cohort of innovators to join Innovation Crossroads, the Southeast region's first entrepreneurial research and development program based at a US Department of Energy national laboratory.

Contact: Stephanie G. Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 275.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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