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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 274.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 18-Apr-2017
Nature Energy
NREL establishes world record for solar hydrogen production
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recaptured the record for highest efficiency in solar hydrogen production via a photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting process.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Apr-2017
Nature Materials
Tweaking a molecule's structure can send it down a different path to crystallization
Silky chocolate, a better medical drug, or solar panels all require the same thing: just the right crystals making up the material. Now, scientists trying to understand the paths crystals take as they form have been able to influence that path by modifying the starting ingredient.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Advantage: Water
When water comes in for a landing on the common catalyst titanium oxide, it splits into hydroxyls just under half the time. Water's oxygen and hydrogen atoms shift back and forth between existing as water or hydroxyls, and water has the slightest advantage, like the score in a highly competitive tennis game.
Department of Energy, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017
Americans use more clean energy in 2016
Americans used more renewable energy in 2016 compared to the previous year, according to the most recent energy flow charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Overall, energy consumption was nearly flat.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2017
Applied Physics Letters
Scientists further understanding of a process that causes heat loss in fusion devices
In the past year, scientists at PPPL have made important advances in understanding secondary electron emission.
DOE/Office of Science, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science Graduate Student Research Program

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2017
Science
Coming to a lab bench near you: Femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy
Berkeley Lab researchers have, for the first time, captured the ephemeral electron movements in a transient state of a chemical reaction using ultrafast, tabletop X-ray spectroscopy. The researchers used femtosecond pulses of X-ray light to catch the unraveling of a ring molecule that is important in biochemical and optoelectronic processes.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017
Physical Review Letters
Simulations of DIII-D experiments shed light on mysterious plasma flows
Article describes how heating core of the plasma can create sheared flow that improves stability and performance of fusion devices.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: John Greenwald
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Apr-2017
Report shines light on installed costs and deployment barriers for residential solar PV
Researchers from the US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory are making available the most detailed component and system-level cost breakdowns to date for residential photovoltaic (PV) solar systems equipped with energy storage-and quantifying previously unknown soft costs for the first time.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Mar-2017
Physical Review Letters
Discovery of a source of fast magnetic reconnection
Feature describes source of the acceleration of a common type of magnetic reconnection.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Mar-2017
Nature Communications
Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to 'on-off' states for graphene
A new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications. Graphene nanoribbons, mere billionths of a meter wide, exhibit different electronic properties than two-dimensional sheets of the material. 'Confinement changes graphene's behavior,' said An-Ping Li, a physicist at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
DOE/Office of Science, Office of Naval Research, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Science Foundation

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-5448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Mar-2017
Jefferson Lab accomplishes critical milestones toward completion of 12 GeV upgrade
CEBAF at the US Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has achieved two major commissioning milestones and is now entering the final stretch of work to conclude its first major upgrade. Recently, the CEBAF accelerator delivered electron beams into two of its experimental halls at energies not possible before the upgrade for commissioning of the experimental equipment currently in each hall.
Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 28-Mar-2017
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science
Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions
University of Virginia professor Leonid Zhigilei led a team that used the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Titan supercomputer to gain deeper insights into laser interactions with metal surfaces.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
hinesjd@ornl.gov
865-574-6944
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Mar-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The economic case for wind and solar energy in Africa
To meet skyrocketing demand for electricity, African countries may have to triple their energy output by 2030. While hydropower and fossil fuel power plants are favored approaches in some quarters, a new assessment by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found that wind and solar can be economically and environmentally competitive options and can contribute significantly to the rising demand.

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Mar-2017
Science
Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol
Results from experiments and computational modeling studies that definitively identify the 'active site' of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO2 will guide the design of improved catalysts for transforming this pollutant to useful chemicals.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2017
Astrophysical Journal
New study maps space dust in 3-D
A new Berkeley Lab-led study provides detailed 3-D views of space dust in the Milky Way, which could help us understand the properties of this dust and how it affects views of distant objects.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2017
Nature Physics
Ultrafast measurements explain quantum dot voltage drop
Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2017
Breaking the supermassive black hole speed limit
A new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.

Contact: Kevin Roark
knroark@lanl.gov
505-665-9202
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Journal of Geophysical Research
Less radiation in inner Van Allen belt than previously believed
The inner Van Allen belt has less radiation than previously believed, according to a recent study in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Observations from NASA's Van Allen probes show the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are actually much rarer and harder to find than scientists expected. This is good news for spacecraft that are orbiting in the region and can be damaged by high levels of radiation.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Nature
'Flying saucer' colloidal quantum dots produce brighter, better lasers
A multi-institutional team of researchers from Canada and the US has demonstrated steady state lasing with solution-processed nanoparticles called 'colloidal quantum dots,' an important step on the path to improving laser tools for fiber optics, video projectors and more accurate medical testing technology. The work is reported today in a paper for the journal Nature.
DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE/Office of Science, United States Department of Energy

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Physics of Plasmas
New feedback system could allow greater control over fusion plasma
A physicist has created a new system that will let scientists control the energy and rotation of plasma in real time in a doughnut-shaped machine known as a tokamak.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2017
The Plant Cell
Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants
Scientists from Brookhaven Lab have identified a previously unknown link between a protein that maintains plant sugar balance and one that turns on oil production. The biochemical detective work points to new strategies for tapping into the energy plants capture from the sun to produce oil-based biofuels and other biomaterials.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Mar-2017
Dan Sinars represents Sandia in first energy leadership class
Dan Sinars, a senior manager in Sandia National Laboratories' pulsed power center, which built and operates the Z facility, is the sole representative from a nuclear weapons lab in a Department of Energy leadership program that recently visited Sandia.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 10-Mar-2017
ORNL, HTS International Corporation to collaborate on manufacturing research
HTS International Corporation and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have signed an agreement to explore potential collaborations in advanced manufacturing research.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2017
Physical Review Letters
Discovery in new material raises questions about theoretical models of superconductivity
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has successfully created the first pure, single-crystal sample of a new iron arsenide superconductor, CaKFe4As4, and studies of this material have called into question some long-standing theoretical models of superconductivity.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Mar-2017
Science
Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance
In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating innovative 2-D layered hybrid perovskites that allow greater freedom in designing and fabricating efficient optoelectronic devices. Industrial and consumer applications could include low cost solar cells, LEDs, laser diodes, detectors, and other nano-optoelectronic devices.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing releases 101-125 out of 274.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

 

 

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