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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 277.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 2-Feb-2017
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 2017
This tip sheet includes: Vacuum insulation panels prove cost-effective solution for DOD; ORNL noise filter puts end to unwanted EMI; NYC focus of ORNL green commuting study; ORNL process speeds battery production process; and ORNL study sheds new light on traditional welding technique.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Feb-2017
The shape of melting in two dimensions
As part of her team's research into matter's tendency to self-organize, Sharon Glotzer of the University of Michigan ran a series of hard particle simulations to study melting in two-dimensional (2-D) systems. Specifically, the team explored how particle shape affects the physics of a 2-D solid-to-fluid melting transition.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
hinesjd@ornl.gov
502-829-3395
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Feb-2017
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Researchers flip script for Li-Ion electrolytes to simulate better batteries
A team led by the California Institute of Technology's Thomas Miller used the Cray XK7 Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify new electrolyte materials with promising properties for lithium-ion conduction in batteries.

Contact: Rachel Harken
harkenrm@ornl.gov
865-574-6944
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Feb-2017
Sandia's solar glitter closer to market with new licensing agreement
An Albuquerque company founded by a Sandia National Laboratories scientist-turned-entrepreneur has received a license for a 'home-grown' technology that could revolutionize the way solar energy is collected and used.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 1-Feb-2017
Nature Communications
High-resolution imaging reveals new understanding of battery cathode particles
Using advanced imaging techniques, scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been able to observe what exactly happens inside a cathode particle as lithium-ion batteries are charged and discharged.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2017
Space Weather
First-ever GPS data release to boost space-weather science
Today, more than 16 years of space-weather data is publicly available for the first time in history. The data comes from space-weather sensors developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory on board the nation's Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vitamin B12: Power broker to the microbes
In the microbial world, vitamin B12 is a hot commodity. It turns out that vitamin B12, a substance produced by only a few organisms but needed by nearly all of them, wields great power in microbial communities -- ubiquitous structures that affect energy and food production, the environment, and human health.
DOE/Office of Science, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Russian Academy of Sciences

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2017
Physics of Plasmas
PPPL scientist uncovers physics behind plasma-etching process
PPPL physicist Igor Kaganovich and collaborators have uncovered some of the physics that make possible the etching of silicon computer chips, which power cell phones, computers, and a huge range of electronic devices.
DOE/Fusion Energy Sciences

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jan-2017
Science
For this metal, electricity flows, but not the heat
Berkeley scientists have discovered that electrons in vanadium dioxide can conduct electricity without conducting heat, an exotic property in an unconventional material. The characteristic could lead to applications in thermoelectrics and window coatings.
Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jan-2017
Physics of Plasmas
PPPL physicist uncovers clues to mechanism behind magnetic reconnection
Physicist Fatima Ebrahimi has published a paper showing that magnetic reconnection -- the process in which magnetic field lines snap together and release energy -- can be triggered by motion in nearby magnetic fields.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jan-2017
Nature Energy
NREL pioneers better way to make renewable hydrogen
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a method which boosts the longevity of high-efficiency photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jan-2017
Biofuel matchmaker: Finding the perfect algae for renewable energy
A new streamlined process could quickly pare down heaps of algae species into just a few that hold the most promise for making biofuel.
US Department of Energy/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jan-2017
Nature
Chemistry on the edge
Defects and jagged surfaces at the edges of nanosized platinum and gold particles are key hot spots for chemical reactivity, researchers confirmed using a unique infrared probe at Berkeley Lab.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2017
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Crystallization method offers new option for carbon capture from ambient air
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a simple, reliable process to capture carbon dioxide directly from ambient air, offering a new option for carbon capture and storage strategies to combat global warming.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jan-2017
Top 10 PPPL stories that you shouldn't miss
Article summarizes top 10 laboratory developments and discoveries in 2016.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2017
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2017
Researchers identify patterns that could be valuable resource for superconductivity research; ORNL researchers developing approaches to preserve forests, wildlife; ORNL supercomputer helping scientists push boundaries; New measurement technique opens pathway to new graphene-based energy, electronic applications; and ORNL cryogenic memory cell circuit could advance pathway to quantum computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Dec-2016
Nature Materials
Researchers use world's smallest diamonds to make wires 3 atoms wide
Scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered a way to use diamondoids -- the smallest possible bits of diamond -- to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires, just three atoms wide.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2016
Physics Review Letters
Feeding the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way
Feature describes method for modeling accretion disk that feeds supermassive Sagittarius A.
National Science Foundation, Lyman Spitzer, Jr. Fellowship, Simons Foundation, and David and Lucille Packard Foundation

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Nanoscale 'conversations' create complex, multi-layered structures
Scientists have developed a way to efficiently create scalable, multilayer, multi-patterned nanoscale structures with unprecedented complexity. The method introduces a significant leap in material intelligence, because each self-assembled layer guides the configuration of additional layers.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
Laser pulses help scientists tease apart complex electron interactions
Using a new laser-driven 'stop-action' technique for studying complex electron interactions under dynamic conditions, scientists have identified an unusual form of energy loss in a material related to superconductors.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation, Aspen Center for Physics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, Georgetown University/McDevitt Bequest

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
2016 AGU Fall Meeting
Many muons: Imaging the underground with help from the cosmos
Alain Bonneville, a geophysicist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, will present details on the muon detector for 'seeing' sequestered carbon dioxide and the comparative field tests at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco. His talk is Thursday, Dec.15, 2016 at 5:40 p.m. in Moscone South, Room 307.

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Science
Scientists boost catalytic activity for key chemical reaction in fuel cells
New catalysts containing platinum and lead could improve the efficiency of fuel cells -- a promising technology for producing clean energy.
DOE/Office of Science, California State University-Northridge, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, National Basic Research Program of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Ministry of Science and Technology

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
New graphene-based system could help us see electrical signaling in heart and nerve cells
Scientists have enlisted the exotic properties of graphene to function like the film of an incredibly sensitive camera system in visually mapping tiny electric fields. They hope to enlist the new method to image electrical signaling networks in our hearts and brains.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2016
Physical Review Letters
New theoretical framework for improved particle accelerators
Article describes new theoretical framework for next-generation particle accelerators.
National Research Foundation of Korea, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Dec-2016
Laser R&D focuses on next-gen particle collider
A set of new laser systems and proposed upgrades at Berkeley Lab's BELLA Center will propel long-term plans for a more compact and affordable ultrahigh-energy particle collider.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-520-0843
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 126-150 out of 277.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

 

 

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