U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 286.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 31-Oct-2017
Energy & Environmental Science
NREL research yields significant thermoelectric performance
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reported significant advances in the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors based on carbon nanotube thin films that could be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2017
NREL inks technology agreement for high efficiency multijunction solar cells
The US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has entered into a license agreement with MicroLink Devices Inc. to commercialize NREL's patented inverted metamorphic multijunction solar cells.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2017
Tourassi named top scientist at ORNL's annual Awards night
Georgia Tourassi of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate has received the ORNL Director's Award for Outstanding Individual Accomplishment in Science and Technology.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2017
Applied Physics Letters
Making glass invisible: A nanoscience-based disappearing act
By texturing glass surfaces with nanosized features, scientists almost completely eliminated surface reflections -- an achievement that could enhance solar cell efficiency, improve consumers' experience with electronic displays, and support high-power laser applications.
Department of Energy

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2017
Physical Review Letters
New studies on disordered cathodes may provide much-needed jolt to lithium batteries
In a pair of papers published this month in Nature Communications and Physical Review Letters (PRL), a team of scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has come up with a set of rules for making new disordered materials, a process that had previously been driven by trial-and-error. They also found a way to incorporate fluorine, which makes the material both more stable and have higher capacity.
Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Oct-2017
Science
Scientists get first close-ups of finger-like growths that trigger battery fires
Scientists from Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the first atomic-level images of finger-like growths called dendrites that can pierce the barrier between battery compartments and trigger short circuits or fires. Dendrites and the problems they cause have been a stumbling block on the road to developing new types of batteries that store more energy so electric cars, cell phones, laptops and other devices can go longer between charges.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Ames Laboratory, UConn discover superconductor with bounce
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has discovered extreme 'bounce,' or super-elastic shape-memory properties in a material that could be applied for use as an actuator in the harshest of conditions, such as outer space, and might be the first in a whole new class of shape memory materials.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2017
Physical Review Letters
Experiment provides deeper look into the nature of neutrinos
The first glimpse of data from the full array of a deeply chilled particle detector operating beneath a mountain in Italy sets the most precise limits yet on where scientists might find a theorized process to help explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Oct-2017
Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion
The blob that ate the tokamak: Physicists gain understanding of bubbles at edge of plasmas
Scientists at PPPL have completed new simulations that could provide insight into how blobs at the plasma edge behave. The simulations, produced by a code called XGC1 developed by a national team based at PPPL, performed kinetic simulations of two different regions of the plasma edge simultaneously.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
609-243-3317
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Oct-2017
Chemistry of Materials
Scientists solve a magnesium mystery in rechargeable battery performance
A Berkeley Lab-led research team has discovered a surprising set of chemical reactions involving magnesium that degrade battery performance even before the battery can be charged up. The findings could steer the design of next-gen batteries.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Oct-2017
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Researchers customize catalysts to boost product yields, decrease separation costs
For some crystalline catalysts, what you see on the surface is not always what you get in the bulk, according to two studies led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The investigators discovered that treating a complex oxide crystal with either heat or chemicals caused different atoms to segregate on the surface, i.e., surface reconstruction. Those differences created catalysts with dissimilar behaviors, which encouraged different reaction pathways and ultimately yielded distinct products.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Oct-2017
Nature
Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings
Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on Aug. 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Oct-2017
Nuclear Fusion
Loops of liquid metal can improve future fusion power plants, scientists say
This article describes innovative liquid lithium loop to address needs of future fusion power plants.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
SimPath licenses novel ORNL system for enhanced synthetic biology
SimPath has licensed a novel cloning system developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that generates and assembles the biological building blocks necessary to synthetically bioengineer new medicines and fuels.
US Department of Energy, Biological and Environmental Research, Genomic Science Program; ORNL's Technology Innovation Program

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
Nature Nanotechnology
Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasers
One of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nanotech Team, the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or 'doped,' with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired laser light with less stimulation and energy loss.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
Astrophysical Journal
Scientists spot explosive counterpart of LIGO/Virgo's latest gravitational waves
A team of scientists using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), the primary observing tool of the Dark Energy Survey, was among the first to observe the fiery aftermath of a recently detected burst of gravitational waves, recording images of the first confirmed explosion from two colliding neutron stars ever seen by astronomers.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2017
Nature
Decoding the origin of heavy elements in the light from a neutron star merger
On Aug. 17, scientists around the globe were treated to near-simultaneous observations by separate instruments: One set of Earth-based detectors measured the signature of a cataclysmic event sending ripples through the fabric of space-time, and a space-based detector measured the gamma-ray signature of a high-energy outburst emanating from the same region of the sky.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2017
Physics of Plasmas
PPPL takes detailed look at 2-D structure of turbulence in tokamaks
This article describes cross-correlation of turbulence in tokamaks.
US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2017
Physical Review Letters
Spin current detection in quantum materials unlocks potential for alternative electronics
A new method that precisely measures the mysterious behavior and magnetic properties of electrons flowing across the surface of quantum materials could open a path to next-generation electronics. A team of scientists has developed an innovative microscopy technique to detect the spin of electrons in topological insulators, a new kind of quantum material that could be used in applications such as spintronics and quantum computing.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2017
Strangpresse licenses ORNL extruder tech for high-volume additive manufacturing
Ohio-based Strangpresse has exclusively licensed additive manufacturing-related extruder technology from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that can quickly print hundreds of pounds of polymer material.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Oct-2017
Ames Lab receives $392,000 in funding to commercialize gas atomization design
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has received $392,000 in funding to commercialize a gas atomization nozzle design used to produce metal powders for manufacturing. In addition, the Laboratory will contribute in-kind matching funds of equal value for the project from private sector partner Ampal, Inc., a part of the United States Metal Powders group of companies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Oct-2017
Exploring the exotic world of quarks and gluons at the dawn of the exascale
As nuclear physicists delve ever deeper into the heart of matter, they require the tools to reveal the next layer of nature's secrets. Nowhere is that more true than in computational nuclear physics. A new research effort led by theorists at DOE's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is now preparing for the next big leap forward in their studies thanks to funding under the 2017 SciDAC Awards for Computational Nuclear Physics.
Department of Energy

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 11-Oct-2017
Nature
Injecting electrons jolts 2-D structure into new atomic pattern
The same electrostatic charge that can make hair stand on end and attach balloons to clothing could be an efficient way to drive atomically thin electronic memory devices of the future, according to a new Berkeley Lab study. Scientists have found a way to reversibly change the atomic structure of a 2-D material by injecting it with electrons. The process uses far less energy than current methods for changing the configuration of a material's structure.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
Nature Communications
Forget about it
Inspired by human forgetfulness -- how our brains discard unnecessary data to make room for new information -- scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and three universities, conducted a recent study that combined supercomputer simulation and X-ray characterization of a material that gradually 'forgets.' This could one day be used for advanced bio-inspired computing.
US Army Research Office, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, C-SPIN, Intel Corporation, Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017
NREL evaluates charging infrastructure needs for growing fleet of electric vehicles
A new study from the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory quantifies how much charging infrastructure would be needed in the United States to support various market growth scenarios for plug-in electric vehicles.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 286.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map