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Showing releases 1-25 out of 26.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 20-Jul-2017
Berkeley Lab to lead multimillion-dollar geothermal energy project
The Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) will lead a new $9 million project aimed at removing technical barriers to commercialization of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), a clean energy technology with the potential to power 100 million American homes.
Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jul-2017
Nature Communications
First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors
Researchers have made the first direct visual observation and measurement of ultra-fast vortex dynamics in superconductors. Their technique, detailed in the journal Nature Communications, could contribute to the development of novel practical applications by optimizing superconductor properties for use in electronics. In photos and videos shown for the first time, the vortices are moving at velocities much faster than previously thought possible -- up to about 72,000 km/hr (45,000 mph).
US-Israel Binational Science Foundation, Israel Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Research Foundation-Flanders, Mandat d'Impulsion Scientifique

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 19-Jul-2017
PNNL scientist Ruby Leung appointed a Battelle Fellow
Ruby Leung of the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been named a Battelle Fellow -- the highest recognition from Battelle for leadership and accomplishment in science.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jul-2017
Gu and Paranthaman named ORNL Corporate Fellows
Researchers Baohua Gu and Parans Paranthaman have been named Corporate Fellows of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jul-2017
Nature Communications
Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactions
Researchers have performed the first ever quantum-mechanical simulation of the benchmark ultracold chemical reaction between potassium-rubidium (KRb) and a potassium atom, opening the door to new controlled chemistry experiments and quantum control of chemical reactions that could spark advances in quantum computing and sensing technologies.
Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Los Alamos, Army Research Office's Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, National Science Foundation, US Air Force Office of Science

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jul-2017
3-D models help scientists gauge flood impact
Using one of the world's most powerful supercomputers, a University of Iowa team performed one of the first highly resolved, 3-D, volume-of-fluid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of a dam break in a natural environment. The simulation allowed the team to map precise water levels for actual flood events over time.

Contact: Rachel Harken
harkenrm@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jul-2017
Nature Climate Change
Titan simulations show importance of close 2-way coupling between human and Earth systems
By using supercomputers such as the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Titan, a large multidisciplinary team of scientists developed a new integrated climate model designed to reduce uncertainties in future climate predictions as it bridges Earth systems with energy and economic models and large-scale human impact data.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2017
Lighting up the study of low-density materials
Sandia National Laboratories studies myriads of low-density materials, from laminate layers in airplane wings to foams and epoxies that cushion parts. So Sandia borrowed and refined a technique being studied by the medical field, X-ray phase contrast imaging, to look inside the softer side of things without taking them apart.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Jul-2017
DOE funds Center for Bioenergy Innovation at ORNL to accelerate biofuels, bioproducts research
The DOE has announced funding for new research centers to accelerate the development of specialty plants and processes for a new generation of biofuels and bioproducts.

Contact: Stephanie G. Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2017
Nano Letters
Rice U professor developing plasmon-powered devices for medicine, security, solar cells
A new method that takes advantage of plasmonic metals' production of 'hot' electrons and holes to boost light to a higher frequency could be suitable for medical, energy and security applications.
US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2017
Journal of Alloys and Compounds
Reduced oxygen nanocrystalline materials show improved performance
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have found that reducing oxygen in some nanocrystalline materials may improve their strength and durability at elevated temperatures, a promising enhancement that could lead to better biosensors, faster jet engines, and greater capacity semiconductors.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Colin Poitras
colin.poitras@uconn.edu
860-486-4656
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 17-Jul-2017
Nature Communications
Studying argon gas trapped in two-dimensional array of tiny 'cages'
For the first time, scientists have trapped a noble gas in a two-dimensional porous structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable detailed studies of individual gas atoms in confinement -- research that could inform the design of new materials for gas separation and nuclear waste remediation.
US Department of Energy, National Scientific and Technical Research Council of Argentina

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2017
Nature Chemistry
Harnessing the right amount of sunshine
Researchers from MIT and the University of Verona have discovered how a key photoprotection protein allows moss and green algae to protect themselves from too much sun by dissipating the extra energy as heat. Learning more about how this protein works could allow scientists to alter it in a way that would promote more photosynthesis, potentially increasing the biomass yield of both crops and algae grown for biofuels.
Center for Excitonics, US Department of Energy, CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholar Award, European Economic Community

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 14-Jul-2017
Nature Communications
Mica provides clue to how water transports minerals
In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Delaware, chemists have been able to look at the interface between water and muscovite mica, a flat mineral commonly found in granite, soils and many sediments. In particular, the researchers looked at the capture and release of rubidium - a metal closely related to but more easily singled out than common elements like potassium and sodium.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2017
Physical Review Letters
Scientists create first laboratory generation of astrophysical shock waves
Feature describes first laboratory generation of an astrophysical shock wave.
US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jul-2017
Portland State to test new revolutionary geothermal technology for heating during winter
Portland State University has received a grant from the US Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility of bringing new methods of harnessing the power of geothermal energy to previously untapped regions of the United States such as Portland.
US Department of Energy

Contact: John Kirkland
kirklandjohnr@msn.com
503-725-2319
Portland State University

Public Release: 13-Jul-2017
Optimizing hydrogen-powered passenger ferries focus of Sandia Labs study
Maritime transportation has emerged as one solution to the traffic gridlock that plagues coastal cities. But with urban passenger ferries operating in sensitive environments and tourist areas, hydrogen fuel cell-powered passenger ferries offer a quiet, zero-emission alternative to conventional diesel vessels.
US Department of Transportation's Maritime Administration's Maritime Environmental and Technical Assistance program

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 13-Jul-2017
Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion
Machine learning technique offers insight into plasma behavior
A paper by graduate student Matthew Parsons describes the application of machine learning to avoiding plasma disruptions, which will be crucial to ensuring the longevity of future large tokamaks.
Fulbright US Student Program, US Department of Energy, DOE/Fusion Energy Sciences

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jul-2017
Nature Communications
Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technology
When it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice -- even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed bio-inspired dynamic templates used to manufacture organic semiconductor materials that produce printable electronics. It uses a process similar to biomineralization -- the way that bones and teeth form. This technique is eco-friendly, which gives the researchers the chance to return the favor to nature.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program

Contact: Lois E Yoksoulian
leyok@illinois.edu
217-244-2788
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 12-Jul-2017
International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant
Nature
Study finds toxic mercury is accumulating in the Arctic tundra
Vast amounts of toxic mercury are accumulating in the Arctic tundra, threatening the health and well-being of people, wildlife and waterways, according to a UMass Lowell scientist investigating the source of the pollution.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Marie Sklodowska-Curie Actions, European Research Council, French National Centre for Scientific Research

Contact: Nancy Cicco
Nancy_Cicco@uml.edu
978-934-4944
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Public Release: 12-Jul-2017
Algae production research gets boost at Los Alamos
Today, the US Department of Energy (DOE) announced the selection of three projects to receive up to $8 million, aimed at reducing the costs of producing algal biofuels and bioproducts.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jul-2017
Earth's Future
Climate change to deplete some US water basins used for irrigation
A new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change's impact on irrigation.
US Environmental Protection Agency, US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Jul-2017
Clean water that's 'just right' with Sandia sensor solution
Working with Parker Hannifin, Sandia National Laboratories combined basic research on an interesting form of carbon with a unique microsensor to make an easy-to-use, table-top tool that quickly and cheaply detects disinfection byproducts in our drinking water before it reaches consumers.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 10-Jul-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New Berkeley lab algorithms extract biological structure from limited data
A new Berkeley Lab algorithmic framework called multi-tiered iterative phasing (M-TIP) utilizes advanced mathematical techniques to determine 3-D molecular structure of important nanoobjects like proteins and viruses from very sparse sets of noisy, single-particle data.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jul-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Spontaneous system follows rules of equilibrium
Discovery could be the beginning of a general framework of rules for seemingly unpredictable non-equilibrium systems.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Emily Ayshford
e-ayshford@northwestern.edu
847-467-1194
Northwestern University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 26.

1 | 2 > >>

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