U.S. Department of Energy

Research News

Science for America's Future

Search Releases and Features:

Publications

Image Gallery

News Release Archive

Features Archive

Library

Contacts

Privacy Policy

Graphical Version

Site Map

 


Labs


Science News by Topic


News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

Public Release: 25-May-2017
Chemical Communications
Argonne scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation
In a new study, Argonne chemist Max Delferro boosted and analyzed the unprecedented catalytic activity of an element called vanadium for hydrogenation -- a reaction that is used for making everything from vegetable oils to petrochemical products to vitamins.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-May-2017
PLOS Biology
Neutrons provide the first nanoscale look at a living cell membrane
A research team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed the first-ever direct nanoscale examination of a living cell membrane. In doing so, it also resolved a long-standing debate by identifying tiny groupings of lipid molecules that are likely key to the cell's functioning.
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-May-2017
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
How X-rays helped to solve mystery of floating rocks
Experiments at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source have helped scientists to solve a mystery of why some rocks can float for years in the ocean, traveling thousands of miles before sinking.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-May-2017
Science
Special X-ray technique allows scientists to see 3-D deformations
In a new study published last Friday in Science, researchers at Argonne used an X-ray scattering technique called Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to reconstruct in 3-D the size and shape of grain defects. These defects create imperfections in the lattice of atoms inside a grain that can give rise to interesting material properties and effects.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2017
Science
Two simple building blocks produce complex 3-D material
Northwestern University scientists have built a structurally complex material from two simple building blocks that is the lowest-density metal-organic framework ever made. Directed by design rules developed by the scientists, uranium atoms and organic linkers self-assemble into a beautiful crystal -- a large, airy 3-D net of very roomy and useful pores. The pores are so roomy, in fact, that the scientists have nestled a large enzyme inside a pore -- no small feat.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences Program

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-May-2017
Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets
Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object
There's something new to look for in the heavens, and it's called a 'synestia,' according to planetary scientists Simon Lock at Harvard University and Sarah Stewart at UC Davis. A synestia, they propose, would be a huge, spinning, donut-shaped mass of hot, vaporized rock, formed as planet-sized objects smash into each other.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 19-May-2017
Science Advances
Triple play boosting value of renewable fuel could tip market in favor of biomass
A new process triples the fraction of biomass converted to high-value products to nearly 80 percent, also tripling the expected rate of return for an investment in the technology from roughly 10 percent (for one end product) to 30 percent.
National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Program, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Dumesic
jdumesic@wisc.edu
608-262-1095
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 19-May-2017
Fusion Engineering and Design
Physicists discover that lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance
A team of physicists has discovered that a coating of lithium oxide on the inside of fusion machines known as tokamaks absorbs as much deuterium as pure lithium does.
Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
Biochemistry
Insight into enzyme's 3-D structure could cut biofuel costs
Using neutron crystallography, a Los Alamos research team has mapped the three-dimensional structure of a protein that breaks down polysaccharides, such as the fibrous cellulose of grasses and woody plants, a finding that could help bring down the cost of creating biofuels.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
ORNL welcomes Innovation Crossroads entrepreneurial research fellows
Oak Ridge National Laboratory today welcomed the first cohort of innovators to join Innovation Crossroads, the Southeast region's first entrepreneurial research and development program based at a US Department of Energy national laboratory.

Contact: Stephanie G. Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-May-2017
Physical Review Letters
Scientists perform first-principles simulation of transition of plasma edge to H-mode
PPPL physicists have simulated the spontaneous transition of turbulence at the edge of a fusion plasma to the high-confinement mode that sustains fusion reactions. The research was achieved with the extreme-scale plasma turbulence code XGC developed at PPPL in collaboration with a nationwide team.
US Department of Energy (Fusion Energy Sciences, Advanced Scientific Computing Research)

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 17-May-2017
Energy & Buildings
Not all cool pavements are created equal
Cool pavements can help keep cities cool, right? Yes, but according to new research from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), many reflective pavements have some unexpected drawbacks relative to conventional pavements when considering the entire life cycle of the materials.
California Air Resources Board

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-May-2017
Nature Communications
Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity
Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites.
US Department of Energy, Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-May-2017
Nature Communications
Refining the ocean's thermometer
The chemistry of shells of plankton called foraminifera are a record of past climate. Recent experiments led by UC Davis scientists show magnesium levels vary in foram shells due to different growth rates during daily light/dark cycles.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 16-May-2017
Advanced Materials
Scientists develop real-time technique for studying ionic liquids at electrode interfaces
This electron microscope-based imaging technique could help scientists optimize the performance of ionic liquids for batteries and other energy storage devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-May-2017
HPC4MfG paper manufacturing project yields first results
Simulations run at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as part of an HPC4Mfg collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and an industry consortium could help US paper manufacturers significantly reduce production costs and increase energy efficiencies.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-May-2017
Advanced Energy Materials
Self-healing tech charges up performance for silicon-containing battery anodes
Researchers at the University of Illinois have found a way to apply self-healing technology to lithium-ion batteries to make them more reliable and last longer.
The Center for Electrochemical Energy Science, US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Lois Yoksoulian
leyok@illinois.edu
217-244-2788
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

More Releases


Features

The global reach of Argonne's nuclear security training team

The global reach of Argonne's nuclear security training team

Full Story >>
 


Middle school engineers find success in iteration in Electric Car Competition

Middle school engineers find success in iteration in Electric Car Competition

Full Story >>
 


More Features


Back to EurekAlert!
A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.