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Showing releases 1-20 out of 20.

Public Release: 23-Mar-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods
Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)--which enables the visualization of viruses, proteins, and other biological structures at the molecular level--is a critical tool used to advance biochemical knowledge. Now Berkeley Lab researchers have extended cryo-EM's impact further by developing a new computational algorithm instrumental in constructing a 3-D atomic-scale model of bacteriophage P22 for the first time.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Mar-2017
Science
Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol
Results from experiments and computational modeling studies that definitively identify the 'active site' of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO2 will guide the design of improved catalysts for transforming this pollutant to useful chemicals.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2017
Astrophysical Journal
New study maps space dust in 3-D
A new Berkeley Lab-led study provides detailed 3-D views of space dust in the Milky Way, which could help us understand the properties of this dust and how it affects views of distant objects.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2017
Nature Physics
Ultrafast measurements explain quantum dot voltage drop
Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2017
New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster
The Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope can look for the complex patterns that indicate specific 'bad apples,' all while using less electricity than a standard 60-watt light bulb, due to its brain-inspired design.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 21-Mar-2017
Breaking the supermassive black hole speed limit
A new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.

Contact: Kevin Roark
knroark@lanl.gov
505-665-9202
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Journal of Geophysical Research
Less radiation in inner Van Allen belt than previously believed
The inner Van Allen belt has less radiation than previously believed, according to a recent study in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Observations from NASA's Van Allen probes show the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are actually much rarer and harder to find than scientists expected. This is good news for spacecraft that are orbiting in the region and can be damaged by high levels of radiation.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Scientific Reports
Testing for Zika virus: There's an app for that
Add rapid, mobile testing for Zika and other viruses to the list of things that smartphone technology is making possible. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a smartphone-controlled, battery-operated diagnostic device that weighs under a pound, costs as little as $100 and can detect Zika, dengue and chikungunya within 30 minutes.

Contact: Jules Bernstein
Jberns@sandia.gov
925-337-3229
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Nature
'Flying saucer' colloidal quantum dots produce brighter, better lasers
A multi-institutional team of researchers from Canada and the US has demonstrated steady state lasing with solution-processed nanoparticles called 'colloidal quantum dots,' an important step on the path to improving laser tools for fiber optics, video projectors and more accurate medical testing technology. The work is reported today in a paper for the journal Nature.
DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE/Office of Science, United States Department of Energy

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Physics of Plasmas
New feedback system could allow greater control over fusion plasma
A physicist has created a new system that will let scientists control the energy and rotation of plasma in real time in a doughnut-shaped machine known as a tokamak.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2017
Power partners: Sandia draws industry into quest for cheaper, cleaner electricity
Sandia National Laboratories is working with three industry partners to commercialize a distributed power system that can produce cheaper, cleaner, more efficient electricity.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Mar-2017
The Plant Cell
Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants
Scientists from Brookhaven Lab have identified a previously unknown link between a protein that maintains plant sugar balance and one that turns on oil production. The biochemical detective work points to new strategies for tapping into the energy plants capture from the sun to produce oil-based biofuels and other biomaterials.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2017
Optica
Electro-optical switch transmits data at record-low temperatures
A silicon optical switch newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories is the first to transmit up to 10 gigabits per second of data at temperatures just a few degrees above absolute zero. The device could enable data transmission for next-generation superconducting computers that store and process data at cryogenic temperatures.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Joshua Miller
jmiller@osa.rog
202-416-1435
The Optical Society

Public Release: 15-Mar-2017
Nature
UNC researchers make discovery that could increase plant yield in wake of looming phosph
Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have pinpointed a key genetic switch that helps soil bacteria living on and inside a plant's roots harvest a vital nutrient with limited global supply. The nutrient, phosphate, makes it to the plant's roots, helping the plant increase its yield.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, US Department of Agriculture, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Thania Benios
thania_benios@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 15-Mar-2017
Biophysical Journal
When proteins court each other, the dance moves matter
Proteins shake their bodies and wave their limbs -- essentially dancing -- all with the goal of optimizing their interaction with other molecules, including other proteins. A new study shows that, in biological courtship, dance moves matter. The findings help to lay a foundation for the development of drugs targeting molecular vibrations. Such pharmaceuticals would block proteins from carrying out tasks that contribute to disease.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 15-Mar-2017
Nano Letters
Mapping the effects of crystal defects
MIT research offers insights into how crystal dislocations -- a common type of defect in materials -- can affect electrical and heat transport through crystals, at a microscopic, quantum mechanical level. A new mathematical approach to analyzing these dislocations uses a new quasiparticle called a dislon.
S3TEC, US Department of Energy, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 14-Mar-2017
Nature Communications
Louisiana wetlands struggling with sea-level rise 4 times the global average
Without major efforts to rebuild Louisiana's wetlands, particularly in the westernmost part of the state, there is little chance that the coast will be able to withstand the accelerating rate of sea-level rise, a new Tulane University study concludes.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, National Institute for Climatic Change Research Coastal Center, The Water Institute of the Gulf

Contact: Barri Bronston
bbronst@tulane.edu
504-314-7444
Tulane University

Public Release: 13-Mar-2017
Dan Sinars represents Sandia in first energy leadership class
Dan Sinars, a senior manager in Sandia National Laboratories' pulsed power center, which built and operates the Z facility, is the sole representative from a nuclear weapons lab in a Department of Energy leadership program that recently visited Sandia.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 13-Mar-2017
Science Advances
A new study provides a solid evidence for global warming
The new study allows a more accurate assessment of how much heat has accumulated in the ocean (and Earth) system. It will be a valuable resource for future studies of oceanic variability and its climatic impacts on both regional and global scales.
Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Zheng Lin
jennylin@mail.iap.ac.cn
86-108-299-5053
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Mar-2017
Nature Chemistry
NYU chemists color world of 3-D crystals with advances in self-assembly
A team of New York University chemists has created self-assembled, three-dimensional DNA crystals that can bind a separate, dye-bearing strand -- a breakthrough that enhances the functionality of these tiny building blocks.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Showing releases 1-20 out of 20.

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