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Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

Public Release: 21-Feb-2017
Nature Materials
Artificial synapse for neural networks
A new organic artificial synapse made by Stanford researchers could support computers that better recreate the way the human brain processes information. It could also lead to improvements in brain-machine technologies.
National Science Foundation, Keck Faculty Scholar Funds, Neurofab at Stanford, Stanford Graduate Fellowship, Sandia's Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program, US Department of Energy, and others

Contact: Taylor Kubota
tkubota@stanford.edu
650-724-7707
Stanford University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2017
Scientific Reports
Origin of spooky meteor noises reappraised by Sandia researchers
Sound travels more slowly than light. Then why does the sound of a meteor entering Earth's atmosphere appear simultaneously, or even prior, to the sight of the meteor itself? Sandia scientists believe they have the answer.

Contact: neal singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Feb-2017
PPPL-led fusion code selected for all 3 pre-exascale supercomputers
Description of PPPL-led fusion code selected to run on all three pre-exascale supercomputers.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Feb-2017
Nature Communications
Designing new materials from 'small' data
A Northwestern and Los Alamos team developed a novel workflow combining machine learning and density functional theory calculations to create design guidelines for new materials that exhibit useful electronic properties, such as ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2017
Nature Communications
NIST quest for climate-friendly refrigerants finds complicated choices
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have just completed a multiyear study to identify the 'best' candidates for future use as air conditioning refrigerants that will have the lowest impact on the climate.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
Energy work brings Sandia Labs two national technology transfer awards
A heat exchanger that makes power generation more efficient and a microgrid for the New Jersey Transit Corp. brought Sandia Labs national technology transfer awards.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
Geophysical Research Letters
Researchers catch extreme waves with higher-resolution modeling
A new Berkeley Lab study shows that high-resolution models captured hurricanes and big waves that low-resolution ones missed. Better extreme wave forecasts are important for coastal cities, the military, the shipping industry, and surfers.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Feb-2017
Kalinin, Paranthaman elected Materials Research Society fellows
Two researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sergei Kalinin and Mariappan Parans Paranthaman, have been elected fellows of the Materials Research Society.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Two PNNL researchers elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists to become members of the prestigious National Academy of Engineering.

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Next-gen dark matter detector in a race to finish line
The race is on to build the most sensitive US-based experiment designed to directly detect dark matter particles. Department of Energy officials have formally approved a key construction milestone that will propel the project toward its April 2020 goal for completion.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Nature Microbiology
Microbiomes more in flux in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are more likely to see dramatic shifts in the make-up of the community of microbes in their gut than healthy people, according to the results of a study published in Nature Microbiology. The results help physicians and scientists understand the disease more fully and potentially offer new ways to track the disease and monitor patients.
National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Örebro University Hospital Research Foundation, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Feb-2017
Nuclear Fusion
UMD physicist improves method for designing fusion experiments
University of Maryland physicist Matt Landreman has made an important revision to a software tool used to design fusion experiments known as stellarators. The new method results in designs that create a magnetic field suitable for confining blazing-hot plasma, while allowing better access for repairs and more places to install sensors. Landreman's new method is described in a paper published Feb. 13, 2017 in the journal Nuclear Fusion.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 10-Feb-2017
Science
Scientists estimate solar nebula's lifetime
A collaborative study involving Brookhaven, MIT, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro suggests the gas cloud from which our solar system formed lasted about 4 million years.
Department of Energy, NASA

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Feb-2017
Nature Scientific Reports
New study of ferroelectrics offers roadmap to multivalued logic for neuromorphic computing
Research published Wednesday in Nature Scientific Reports lays out a theoretical map to use ferroelectric material to process information using multivalued logic -- a leap beyond the simple ones and zeroes that make up our current computing systems that could let us process information much more efficiently.
DOE/Office of Science, Materials Science and Engineering Division, European Commission

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Feb-2017
Los Alamos research on cancer's origins key part of huge grant
Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Ludmil Alexandrov has been announced as a member of one of the first four global research teams funded under Cancer Research UK's 'Grand Challenge,' which seeks to revolutionize the understanding of cancer and its prevention, diagnosis and treatment.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Feb-2017
ORNL wins four FLC technology transfer awards
Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers win four Federal Laboratory Consortium awards.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Feb-2017
Science
Chemicals hitch a ride onto new protein for better compounds
Berkeley Lab chemists have developed a powerful new method of selectively linking chemicals to proteins, a major advance in the manipulation of biomolecules that could transform the way drugs are developed, proteins are probed, and molecules are tracked and imaged. This technique, called ReACT, is akin to a chemical Swiss army knife for proteins.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

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