National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1122.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 ]

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mass extinctions remove species but not ecological variety
Though mass extinctions wiped out staggeringly high numbers of species, they barely touched the overall 'functional' diversity -- how each species makes a living, be it filtering phytoplankton or eating small crustaceans, burrowing or clamping onto rocks. University of Chicago scientists documented this surprising trend in a study on extinctions published Jan. 5 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Louise Lerner
louise@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
Global Environmental Change
Grocery store program improves farmers' adoption of environmental practices
In one of the first analyses of a company-led sustainability program in the food and agriculture space, Stanford researchers found a major grocery chain fostered increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level.
Stanford University, National Science Foundation

Contact: Danielle Torrent Tucker
dttucker@stanford.edu
650-497-9541
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
Astronomical Journal
Planets around other stars are like peas in a pod
A study of 909 planets and 355 stars carried out at the W.M. Keck Observatory reveals that, unlike our solar system, other planetary systems are distinguished by strict regularity.
Trottier Family Foundation, Hubble Fellowship, NASA, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Julie Gazaille
j.cordeau-gazaille@umontreal.ca
514-343-6796
University of Montreal

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
Journal of Experimental Biology
Emperor penguins may shorten record fast by snacking
Male emperor penguins are famed for their feats of endurance, fasting for 115 days during the mating season and while incubating eggs. However, some emperor penguin colonies are situated closer to the sea ice edge; might they have shorter fasts? During the Antarctic winter, Gerald Kooyman observed Cape Washington emperor penguins diving in the dark, suggesting that they might be feeding during the mating season, shortening their fast to as little as 65 days.
National Science Foundation, Office of Polar Programs

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn.knight@biologists.com
44-012-236-32871
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
Ecosphere
In urban streams, pharmaceutical pollution is driving microbial resistance
In urban streams, persistent pharmaceutical pollution can cause aquatic microbial communities to become resistant to drugs. So reports a new study published today in the journal Ecosphere.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori M. Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x233
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 9-Jan-2018
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
Linking success in some fields to intellectual talent undermines women's interest in them
Due to the cultural stereotypes that portray 'brilliance' as a male trait, messages that tie success in a particular field, job opportunity, or college major to this trait undermine women's interest in it.
National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
MSU environmental scientist wins grant to research forest management consequences
William Kleindl and colleagues will use a $312,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to determine what effect forest management decisions have on forest ecology from local to regional to continental scales.
National Science Foundation, Early NEON Science Program

Contact: William Kleindl
william.kleindl@montana.edu
406-994-7060
Montana State University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
ACS Nano
Rice University lab modifies nanoscale virus to deliver peptide drugs to cells, tissues
Rice University bioengineers develop programmable adeno-associated viruses that may be used to deliver peptide drugs.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Nature Communications
Improved blood stabilization should expand use of circulating tumor cell profiling
A new blood stabilization method, developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine, significantly prolongs the lifespan of blood samples for microfluidic sorting and transcriptome profiling of rare circulating tumor cells, living cancer cells carried in the bloodstream.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation, US Department of Defense, Burroughs Wellcome Trust, National Science Foundation, Lustgarten Foundation, Verville Family Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Noise pollution causes chronic stress in birds, with health consequences for young
Birds exposed to the persistent noise of natural gas compressors show symptoms remarkably similar to those in humans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, new research shows.
National Geographic Society, National Science Foundation, North American Bluebird Society, University of Colorado Boulder

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoose@flmnh.ufl.edu
352-273-1922
Florida Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Nature Communications
Chemists discover plausible recipe for early life on Earth
Chemists find key chemical reactions that support life today could have been carried out with ingredients likely present on the planet four billion years ago.
National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation, Henry Keith and Ellen Hard Townes Professorship

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Noise from oil and gas operations stresses birds, hinders reproduction
Birds exposed to constant noise from oil and gas operations show physiological signs of chronic stress, have chicks whose growth is stunted, and -- in some cases -- lay fewer eggs that hatch, according to a new study.
National Geographic, National Science Foundation, North American Bluebird Society

Contact: Lisa Marshall
lisa.marshall@colorado.edu
303-492-3115
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Hide or get eaten,' urine chemicals tell mud crabs
Pinpointing urine compounds for the first time that make mud crabs hide for their lives, if blue crabs pee nearby, opens new doors to understanding how chemicals invisibly regulate marine wildlife.
National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences

Contact: Ben Brumfield
ben.brumfield@comm.gatech.edu
404-660-1408
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
North American waterways are becoming saltier and more alkaline
A University of Maryland-led study is the first to assess long-term changes in freshwater salinity and pH at the continental scale. Drawn from data recorded at 232 USGS monitoring sites across the country over the past 50 years, the analysis shows significant increases in both salinization and alkalinization. The results also suggest a close link between the two properties, with different salt compounds combining to do more damage than any one salt on its own.
National Science Foundation, US Geological Survey, Hudson River Foundation, Chesapeake Bay Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 8-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
US rivers and streams are compromised by increasing salt loads
Human activities are exposing US rivers and streams to a cocktail of salts, with consequences for infrastructure and drinking water supplies. So reports a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that is the first to assess the combined, long-term changes in freshwater salinity and alkalization across the country.
National Science Foundation, US Geological Survey, Hudson River Foundation, Chesapeake Bay Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Contact: Lori M. Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x233
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 5-Jan-2018
Global Change Biology
Ocean acidification means major changes for California mussels, FSU researcher says
Accelerating ocean acidification could be transforming the fundamental structure of California mussel shells, according to a new report from a Florida State University-led team of scientists.
National Science Foundation, Marine Alliance for Science and Technology Scotland

Contact: Zachary Boehm
zboehm@fsu.edu
850-645-1504
Florida State University

Public Release: 5-Jan-2018
Ecology
In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil
In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Guiden
mary.guiden@colostate.edu
970-491-6892
Colorado State University

Public Release: 5-Jan-2018
Physics in Medicine and Biology
Radiation therapy algorithm could reduce side effects, maintain effect against tumors
A mathematical model for computing radiation therapy treatments could substantially reduce patient side effects while delivering the same results as conventional radiation therapy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tracey Peake
tracey_peake@ncsu.edu
919-515-6142
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 5-Jan-2018
Journal of Materials Science
Ultrafine fibers have exceptional strength
MIT researchers have developed a process to produce ultrafine fibers -- whose width is measured in nanometers -- that are exceptionally strong, tough, inexpensive, and easy to produce, and could be choice materials for many applications, such as protective armor.
Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, National Science Foundation, Center for Materials Science and Engineering

Contact: Ms. Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Jan-2018
Ecology and Evolution
Study shows treeshrews break evolutionary 'rules'
According to a study published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, Tupaia glis, the common treeshrew, defies two widely tested rules that describe patterns of geographical variation within species: the island rule and Bergmann's rule.
National Science Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, United States Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Contact: Mike Cummings
michael.cummings@yale.edu
203-432-9548
Yale University

Public Release: 4-Jan-2018
ACS Catalysis
Rice U.'s one-step catalyst turns nitrates into water and air
Engineers at Rice University's Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT) Center have found a catalyst the cleans toxic nitrates from drinking water by converting them into air and water.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 4-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Macrophage nanosponges could keep sepsis in check
Researchers at UC San Diego have developed macrophage 'nanosponges' -- nanoparticles cloaked in the cell membranes of macrophages -- that can safely remove sepsis-causing molecules from the bloodstream. In lab tests, these macrophage nanosponges improved survival rates in mice with sepsis.
National Science Foundation, Defense Threat Reduction Agency Joint Science and Technology Office for Chemical and Biological Defense, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 4-Jan-2018
Science
Worm species lost 7,000 genes after evolving to fertilize itself
Reproduction in most animal species requires breeding between two individuals. But some worms have evolved the ability to go it alone. In these species, a single individual can breed with itself to produce offspring. A new University of Maryland-led study found that gaining this ability, known as 'selfing,' may have caused a worm species to lose a quarter of its genome, including genes that give male sperm a competitive edge during mating.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Moore Foundation, Cornell University

Contact: Irene Ying
zying@umd.edu
301-405-5204
University of Maryland

Public Release: 4-Jan-2018
Current Biology
Bonobos prefer jerks
Never trust anyone who is rude to a waiter, advice columnists say. But while humans generally prefer individuals who are nice to others, a Duke University study finds bonobos are more attracted to jerks. The fact that our closest primate relatives prefer bullies suggests that an aversion to creeps is one of the things that makes humans different from other species, and may underlie our unusually cooperative nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 3-Jan-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots
A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. And, they claim, these microscale machines -- equipped with electronic, photonic and chemical payloads -- could become a powerful platform for robotics at the size scale of biological microorganisms.
The Cornell Center for Materials Research, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Kavli Institute

Contact: Daryl Ann Lovell
dal296@cornell.edu
607-592-3925
Cornell University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1122.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Science360 Science for Everyone
The Science360 Video Library immerses visitors in the latest wonders of science, engineering, technology and math. Each video is embeddable for use on your website, blog or social media page.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From "Understanding the Brain" to "Engineering Agriculture's Future", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.