National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Chemistry & Materials
Earth & Environment
People & Society
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 501-525 out of 890.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 ]

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
ACS Nano
Germs add ripples to make 'groovy' graphene
Graphene, a two-dimensional wonder-material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms linked in a hexagonal chicken-wire pattern, has attracted intense interest for its phenomenal ability to conduct electricity. Now University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have used rod-shaped bacteria -- precisely aligned in an electric field, then vacuum-shrunk under a graphene sheet -- to introduce nanoscale ripples in the material, causing it to conduct electrons differently in perpendicular directions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bill Burton
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Nature Materials
Reconfiguring active particles into dynamic patterns
Applying an electrostatic imbalance to Janus colloids causes them to self propel into swarms, clusters, and connected chains.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
Northwestern University

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Chemistry of Materials
Researchers develop faster, precise silica coating process for quantum dot nanorods
Materials researchers have fine-tuned a technique that enables them to apply precisely controlled silica coatings to quantum dot nanorods in a day -- up to 21 times faster than previous methods. In addition to saving time, the advance means the quantum dots are less likely to degrade, preserving their advantageous optical properties.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Physicists couple distant nuclear spins using a single electron
For the first time, researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have coupled the nuclear spins of distant atoms using just a single electron. Three research groups took part in this complex experiment, the results of which have now been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
National Center of Competence in Research Quantum Science and Technology, Swiss National Science Foundation, Swiss Nanoscience Institute

Contact: Reto Caluori
University of Basel

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sources, occurrence rate of groundwater methane in Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin
The rate of groundwater contamination due to natural gas leakage from oil and gas wells has remained largely unchanged in northeastern Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin since 2001, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study based on public records and historical data.
NSF/AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network

Contact: Joseph Ryan
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Developmental Cell
Study shows a new role for B-complex vitamins in promoting stem cell proliferation
Folates can stimulate stem cell proliferation independently of their role as vitamins, according to a collaborative study from the University of Georgia and Tufts University, which used an in vitro culture and animal model system in their findings. Folates, whether supplemental B vitamins or natural folates found in food, are essential for the proper functioning of all cells in the body and are critical to prevent birth defects.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Alan Flurry
University of Georgia

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Berkeley Lab scientists grow atomically thin transistors and circuits
In an advance that helps pave the way for next-generation electronics and computing technologies -- and possibly paper-thin gadgets -- scientists with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a way to chemically assemble transistors and circuits that are only a few atoms thick.
Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation

Contact: Jon Weiner
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Changes in primate teeth linked to rise of monkeys
UC Berkeley's Leslea Hlusko searches for simple inherited dental characteristics that could lead to genes controlling tooth development, and has ucovered an easy-to-measure trait that tracks primate evolution over the last 20 million years, shedding light on the mysterious decline of apes and the rise of monkeys 8 million years ago. She concludes that monkeys diversified and took over the dentition niche of the majority of apes. Apes with outlying dentition, including human ancestors, remained.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Sanders
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Scientific Reports
Ultrashort cell-free DNA reveals health of organ transplants
When cells die, whether through apoptosis or necrosis, the DNA and other molecules found in those cells don't just disappear. They wind up in the blood stream, where degraded bits and pieces can be extracted.
National Science Foundation, Noyce Foundation

Contact: Daryl Lovell
Cornell University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Nature Materials
Setting the gold standard
A team of University of Florida researchers has figured out how gold can be used in crystals grown by light to create nanoparticles, a discovery that has major implications for industry and cancer treatment and could improve the function of pharmaceuticals, medical equipment and solar panels.
Air Force Office of Science Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Wei David Wei
University of Florida

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
A 'time switch' in the brain improves sense of smell 
When the brain processes olfactory stimuli, it differentiates between similar smells using subtly modulated signals. Brain examinations and behavioral studies in mice have now shown that neurons with inhibiting characteristics play a key role in this process.
German Research Foundation, NeuroCure Cluster of Excellence, European Research Council, Swiss National Science Foundation, Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds

Contact: Vera Glaßer
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation
Sensing trouble: A new way to detect hidden damage in bridges, roads
University of Delaware engineers Erik Thostenson and Thomas Schumacher have documented a new approach for monitoring the structural health of roads, bridges and other structures. The method, which applies a noninvasive medical imaging technique to a carbon nanotube-based sensor, is reported in the Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation. , is documented in a paper published in the Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation in June.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Bothum
University of Delaware

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Research aims to grasp complexities in plant-pollinator networks across tallgrass prairies
University of Kansas graduate student Kathy Denning has earned a grant from the National Science Foundation to support research centering on molecular genetic analysis of pollen grains recovered from bees across 10 prairie sites in Kansas.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
University of Kansas

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Nano Letters
University of Illinois researchers demonstrate tunable wetting and adhesion of graphene
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated doping-induced tunable wetting and adhesion of graphene, revealing new and unique opportunities for advanced coating materials and transducers. The study suggests for the first time that the doping-induced modulation of the charge carrier density in graphene influences its wettability and adhesion.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research/Asian Office of Aerospace Research Development, National Science Foundation

Contact: SungWoo Nam
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
New clues could help scientists harness the power of photosynthesis
A discovery has been made that could enable scientists to design better ways to use light energy and to engineer crop plants that more efficiently harness the energy of the Sun. The identification of a gene needed to expand light harvesting in photosynthesis into the far-red-light spectrum provides clues to the evolution of oxygen-producing photosynthesis, an evolutionary advance that changed the history of life on Earth.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, European Commission Marie Skodowska-Curie Global Fellowship

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
Penn State

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Current Biology
Like humans, lowly cockroach uses a GPS to get around, scientists find
Rats, men and cockroaches appear to have a similar GPS in their heads that allows them to navigate new surroundings, researchers at Case Western Reserve University report.
National Science Foundation

Contact: William Lubinger
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Newly discovered planet has 3 suns
A team of astronomers led by the University of Arizona has discovered a planet in a unique position between three stars. The finding shows that massive planets may be found on long and possibly unstable orbits in multi-star systems, expanding current models of how star systems and their planets form.
National Science Foundation, European Southern Observatory, European Commission/Sixth and Seventh Framework Programmes

Contact: Daniel Stolte
University of Arizona

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Researchers improve catalyst efficiency for clean industries
Researchers have developed a way to use less platinum in chemical reactions commonly used in the clean energy, green chemicals, and automotive industries, according to a paper in Science.
National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences, General Motors

Contact: Tina Hilding, WSU College of Engineering and Architecture
Washington State University

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Robot helps study how first land animals moved 360 million years ago
When early terrestrial animals began moving about on mud and sand 360 million years ago, the powerful tails they used as fish may have been more important than scientists previously realized. That's one conclusion from a new study of African mudskipper fish and a robot modeled on the animal.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Office, Army Research Laboratory

Contact: John Toon
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
A sharper focus for plasmonic lasers
Lehigh University researcher Sushil Kumar and his group have demonstrated that it is possible to induce plasmonic lasers to emit a narrow beam of light by adapting a technique called distributed feedback. They have experimentally implemented a scheme for terahertz plasmonic lasers that emit radiation at extremely long wavelengths (approximately 100 microns). Their results have been published today in an article in Optica, the journal of the Optical Society of America.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
Lehigh University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
11th ACM on Asia Conference on Computer and Communications Security
Your smartwatch is giving away your ATM PIN
Wearable devices can give away your passwords, according to new research. In the paper 'Friend or Foe?: Your Wearable Devices Reveal Your Personal PIN' scientists from Binghamton University and the Stevens Institute of Technology combined data from embedded sensors in wearable technologies, such as smartwatches and fitness trackers, along with a computer algorithm to crack private PINs and passwords with 80-percent accuracy on the first try and more than 90-percent accuracy after three tries.
National Science Foundation, United States Army Research Office

Contact: Yan Wang
Binghamton University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Atmospheric Environment
Bees' ability to forage decreases as air pollution increases
Air pollutants interact with and break down plant-emitted scent molecules, which insect pollinators use to locate needed food, according to a team of researchers led by Penn State. The pollution-modified plant odors can confuse bees and, as a result, bees' foraging time increases and pollination efficiency decreases. This happens because the chemical interactions decrease both the scent molecules' life spans and the distances they travel.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
Penn State

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security
It's automatic: CMU smartphone app manages your privacy preferences
A field study suggests a personalized privacy assistant app being developed at Carnegie Mellon University can simplify the chore of setting privacy permissions for your smartphone apps. That's a task that requires well over a hundred decisions, an unmanageable number for the typical user.
National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Air Force Research Laboratory

Contact: Byron Spice
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chemical trail on Titan may be key to prebiotic conditions
Cornell scientists have uncovered a chemical trail that suggests prebiotic conditions may exist on Saturn's moon, Titan.
John Templeton Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Daryl Lovell
Cornell University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
'Omics' data improves breast cancer survival prediction
Precise predictions of whether a tumor is likely to spread would help clinicians and patients choose the best course of treatment. But current methods fall short of the precision needed. New research reveals that profiling primary tumor samples using genomic technologies can improve the accuracy of breast cancer survival predictions compared to clinical information alone. The study was published in the journal GENETICS, a publication of the Genetics Society of America.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Cancer Society, University of Alabama at Birmingham-Comprehensive Cancer Center

Contact: Cristy Gelling
Genetics Society of America

Showing releases 501-525 out of 890.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 ]

Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Science360 Science for Everyone
The Science360 Video Library immerses visitors in the latest wonders of science, engineering, technology and math. Each video is embeddable for use on your website, blog or social media page.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From "Understanding the Brain" to "Engineering Agriculture's Future", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.