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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 526-550 out of 872.

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Public Release: 7-Nov-2016
Genome Research
Gene network controls how many flowers and fruits plants will make in critical growth window
A CSHL team have used RNA sequencing to identify a network of hundreds of genes that work together to determine the duration of a critical window for the growth of stem cells in plants that give rise to flowers. The longer this window remains open, the more stem cells develop and the more flowers and branches that can grow.
National Science Foundation, Next-Generation BioGreen 21 Program

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Nov-2016
Nature Ecology and Evolution
New coral research exposes genomic underpinnings of adaptation
Scientists have observed for the first time that separate populations of the same species can diverge in their capacity to regulate genes when adapting to their local environment. The research may help predict how corals will fare under climate change.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kristin Philips
kristin.phillips@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-0654
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 7-Nov-2016
Scientific Reports
Rice U. lab creates open-source optogenetics hardware, software
Rice University bioengineers have designed a low-cost, open-source optogenetics instrument that can be used by researchers who don't have optics or programming expertise. Rice's Light Plate Apparatus, which is described online this week in the open-access journal Scientific Reports, can be assembled in one day for less than $150.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, Ford Foundation, Department of Energy, Simons Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 7-Nov-2016
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Andeans with altitude sickness produce massive amounts of red blood cells
To better understand why some people adapt well to life at high altitude while others don't, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine studied red blood cells derived from representatives of both groups living in the Andes Mountains. The study reveals that high-altitude, low-oxygen dwellers prone to chronic mountain sickness produce massive amounts of red blood cells thanks to overproduction of the enzyme SENP1.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
858-249-0456
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 4-Nov-2016
PLOS Biology
Study finds female faculty are underrepresented in genomics
A Northwestern University study of collaboration patterns sheds light on how the experiences of STEM female and male faculty vary. Researchers have found that female faculty (in six different disciplines) have as many collaborators, or co-authors, as male faculty and that female faculty tend to return to the same collaborators a little less than males. But they also found that females are underrepresented in large teams in genomics, which could indicate a negative cultural milieu.
The Department of Defense's Army Research Office, The John Templeton Foundation Award, National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2016
SUNY Geneseo composer embarks on music project in Antarctica
A SUNY Geneseo faculty member is in Antarctica with a team of climate scientists this month where he is gathering seismic data from the Ross Ice Shelf to compose music in drawing attention to the viability of the shelf.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Irwin
irwin@geneseo.edu
585-245-5529
SUNY Geneseo

Public Release: 4-Nov-2016
Ecosystem Health and Sustainability
Yesterday's Silk Road could be tomorrow's environmental superhighway
While China is building a gigantic modern-day upgrade of the famed ancient Silk Road resplendent in global cooperation in the name of economic expansion, a group of sustainability scholars point out that the Belt and Road Initiative also could be a superhighway of environmental progress.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2016
Science
Researchers confirm universal principles of phase transitions
New research conducted at the University of Chicago has confirmed a decades-old theory describing the dynamics of continuous phase transitions. The findings, published in the Nov. 4 issue of Science, provide the first clear demonstration of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism for a quantum phase transition in both space and time. Prof. Cheng Chin and his team of UChicago physicists observed the transition in gaseous cesium atoms at temperatures near absolute zero.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Office Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

Contact: Greg Borzo
gregborzo@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 4-Nov-2016
ACS Nano
Light drives single-molecule nanoroadsters
Scientists at Rice University and their international colleagues are driving three-wheeled, single-molecule 'nanoroadsters' with light and, for the first time, seeing how they move.
National Science Foundation, Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship, German Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2016
PLOS Biology
Study finds female faculty are underrepresented in genomics
A Northwestern University study of the collaboration patterns sheds light on how the experiences of STEM female and male faculty vary. Researchers have found that female faculty (in six different disciplines) have as many collaborators, or co-authors, as male faculty and that female faculty tend to return to the same collaborators a little less than males. But they also found that females are underrepresented in large teams in genomics (a subdiscipline of molecular biology), which could indicate a negative cultural milieu.
DOD/Army Research Office, John Templeton Foundation Award, National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 3-Nov-2016
Science
Scientists set traps for atoms with single-particle precision
In a paper published today in the journal Science, researchers from MIT and Harvard report on a new method that enables them to use lasers as optical 'tweezers' to pick individual atoms out from a cloud and hold them in place. As the atoms are 'trapped,' the scientists use a camera to create images of the atoms and their locations.
National Science Foundation, National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Nov-2016
Nano Letters
Controlling the properties of matter in two-dimensional crystals
By creating atomic chains in a two-dimensional crystal, researchers at Penn State believe they have found a way to control the direction of materials properties in two and three dimensional crystals with implications in sensing, optoelectronics and next-generation electronics applications.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 3-Nov-2016
Cell Metabolism
How the liver dances to a day/night rhythm
Following the day-night cycle, the liver has its own metabolic rhythm. Using cutting-edge proteomics, scientists at EPFL and the Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences have now identified over 500 liver proteins that change in abundance over the course of the day in the cell nucleus, opening a new dimension of metabolism.
Swiss National Science Foundation, EPFL, European Research Council, Leenaards Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Journal of Behavioral Decision Making
Questionnaire predicts likelihood of unprotected sex, binge drinking
Researchers in the social sciences have been searching for a holy grail: an accurate way to predict who is likely to engage in problematic behavior, like using drugs.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rebecca Valli
rv234@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Physical Review Fluids
The pop-up effect: Why buoyant spheres don't always leap out of the water
When you a force a buoyant ball underwater and let go, it springs to the surface and jumps into the air. But submerge the ball deeper underwater for a bigger leap, and the effect is often disappointing.
National Science Foundation, Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Contact: Tadd Truscott
tadd.truscott@usu.edu
435-797-8246
Utah State University

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Internet in wide open spaces
With NSF funding, UCSB computer science professor Elizabeth Belding leads efforts to provide internet to rural tribal communities
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Science Advances
When corals met algae: Symbiotic relationship crucial to reef survival dates to the Triassic
The mutually beneficial relationship between algae and modern corals -- which provides algae with shelter, gives coral reefs their colors and supplies both organisms with nutrients -- began more than 210 million years ago, according to a new study by an international team of scientists including researchers from Princeton University. The findings suggest that this symbiotic relationship is crucial for the health of coral reefs.
National Science Center of Poland, European Regional Development Fund, European Research Council Advanced Grant, National Science Foundation, and Princeton Environmental Institute

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
609-258-0541
Princeton University

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
New US Robotics Roadmap calls for increased regulations, education and research
A new US Robotics Roadmap released Oct. 31 calls for better policy frameworks to safely integrate new technologies, such as self-driving cars and commercial drones, into everyday life. The document also advocates for increased research efforts in the field of human-robot interaction to develop intelligent machines that will empower people to stay in their homes as they age. It calls for increased education efforts in the STEM fields from elementary school to adult learners.
National Science Foundation, University of California San Diego, Oregon State University, Georgia Institute of Technology

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@eng.ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Astrophysical Journal
Close galactic encounter leaves 'nearly naked' supermassive black hole
Astronomers looking for binary black holes make surprising discovery of the shredded remnant of a smaller galaxy that passed through a larger neighbor, losing most of its stars and gas in the process.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Finley
dfinley@nrao.edu
575-835-7302
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
UNM Center for Quantum Information and Control receives multi-million-dollar award
Quantum information science is going to change the world. Being able to manipulate and control individual atoms and other microscopic systems to do jobs in communications, sensing and computation will have an impact on nearly every aspect of our daily lives. And, for the University of New Mexico's Center for Quantum Information & Control (CQuIC), a new multi-million-dollar grant will allow UNM to continue at the forefront of this innovative field.
National Science Foundation Division of Physics

Contact: Aaron Hilf
ahilf@unm.edu
505-377-1727
University of New Mexico

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
Scientific Reports
Technology brings new precision to study of circadian rhythm in individual cells
A new technology may help scientists better understand how an individual cell synchronizes its biological clock with other cells.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mike Wooten
mwooten@uga.edu
706-542-0886
University of Georgia

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
New research will create a 21st-century tally of biodiversity in Southwest Pacific
Rob Moyle is leading a major research effort in the region supported by $1.3 million from the National Science Foundation to conduct fieldwork, collect museum specimens, record bioacoustics and sequence DNA of birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
New 'digital life' initiative aims to create 3-D models of all living creatures
Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by biologist Duncan Irschick who created the Beastcam Array, a rapid-capture, field portable tabletop system for making high-resolution, full-color 3-D models of living organisms, now plan to use it in an ambitious effort to create 3-D models of all living organisms.
National Science Foundation, UMass Amherst's Center for Evolutionary Materials

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
USDA announces four university teams win the first national I-FAST Prize Competition
The US Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the National Science Foundation today announced the winners of the first Innovations in Food and Agricultural Science and Technology $200,000 prize competition. I-FAST helps scientists and engineers broaden the impact of their NIFA-funded research by encouraging collaboration between academia and industry to translate fundamental agricultural innovations into the marketplace.
NIH/National Institute of Food and Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sally Gifford
sally.gifford@nifa.usda.gov
202-720-2047
National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Public Release: 2-Nov-2016
ACS Energy Letters
Making high-performance batteries from junkyard scraps
Vanderbilt researchers have discovered how to make high-performance batteries using scraps of metal from the junkyard and common household chemicals.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: David F Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Showing releases 526-550 out of 872.

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