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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 676-700 out of 840.

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Public Release: 3-May-2016
UTSA professor receives grant to create more versatile legged robots
Pranav Bhounsule, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has received a $160,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to continue his top-tier research on bipedal robots. Bhounsule, head of UTSA's Robotics and Motion Laboratory, plans to create algorithms that enable legged robots to balance themselves while handling difficult terrain, an asset most robots currently lack.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joanna Carver
mallratbitsy@gmail.com
210-612-4211
University of Texas at San Antonio

Public Release: 3-May-2016
Journal of Geophysical Research - Solid Earth
UNC-Chapel Hill scientists find likely cause for recent southeast US earthquakes
The southeastern United States should, by all means, be relatively quiet in terms of seismic activity. It's located in the interior of the North American Plate, far away from plate boundaries where earthquakes usually occur. But the area has seen some notable seismic events -- most recently, the 2011 magnitude-5.8 earthquake near Mineral, Virginia that shook the nation's capital.
National Science Foundation EarthScopeProgram, American Recoveryand Reinvestment Act of 2009

Contact: Thania Benios
thania_benios@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 3-May-2016
Nature Communications
Scientists reveal how cell corrects errors made in gene transcription
The dynamics of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) backtracking process is poorly understood. HKUST scientists built a Markov State Model from extensive molecular dynamics simulations to identify metastable intermediate states and the dynamics of backtracking at atomistic detail. The results reveal that Pol II backtracking occurs in a stepwise mode where two intermediate states are involved.
Hong Kong Research Grants Council, National Science Foundation of China, Kimmel Scholars award, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UCSD Academic Senate Research Award, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

Contact: Yui Kong heung
sherryno@ust.hk
852-235-86317
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 3-May-2016
Optica
An experiment seeks to make quantum physics visible to the naked eye
Predictions from quantum physics have been confirmed by countless experiments, but no one has yet detected the quantum physical effect of entanglement directly with the naked eye. This should now be possible thanks to an experiment proposed by a team around a theoretical physicist at the University of Basel. The experiment might pave the way for new applications in quantum physics.
Swiss National Science Foundation, National Center of Competence in Research in Quantum Science and Technology, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Reto Caluori
reto.caluori@unibas.ch
41-612-672-495
University of Basel

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Social Neuroscience
Children react physically to stress from their social networks
Research has shown the significance of social relationships in influencing adult human behavior and health; however, little is known about how children's perception of their social networks correlates with stress and how it may influence development. Now, a University of Missouri research team has determined that children and adolescents physically react to their social networks and the stress those networks may cause.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Hurricanes key to carbon uptake by forests
New research reveals that the increase in forest photosynthesis and growth made possible by tropical cyclones in the southeastern United States captures hundreds of times more carbon than is released by all vehicles in the US in a given year.
National Science Foundation, NOAA

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
New study found ocean acidification may be impacting coral reefs in the Florida keys
MIAMI -- In a new study, University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers found that the limestone that forms the foundation of coral reefs along the Florida Reef Tract is dissolving during the fall and winter months on many reefs in the Florida Keys. The research showed that the upper Florida Keys were the most impacted by the annual loss of reef.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Making invisible physics visible
Physicists create a radically new sensor technology that captures nanoscale images with precise spatial resolution and sensitivity.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers Award, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Quantum-Assisted Sensing and Readout Program, National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie Cohen
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Engineering student wins NSF research fellowship
A University of Houston student set to graduate this spring has been awarded a graduate research fellowship from the National Science Foundation, propelling him toward a graduate degree in chemical engineering.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 2-May-2016
International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
New tech uses hardware, software to train dogs more efficiently
Researchers have developed and used a customized suite of technologies that allows a computer to train a dog autonomously, with the computer effectively responding to the dog based on the dog's body language
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Californian sudden oak death epidemic 'unstoppable,' new epidemics must be managed earlier
New research shows the sudden oak death epidemic in California cannot now be stopped, but that its tremendous ecological and economic impacts could have been greatly reduced if control had been started earlier. The research also identifies new strategies to enhance control of future epidemics, including identifying where and how to fell trees, as 'there will be a next time.'
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Hayward
jennifer.hayward@admin.cam.ac.uk
122-374-8174
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Nature Physics
How DNA can take on the properties of sand or toothpaste
When does DNA behave like sand or toothpaste? When the genetic material is so densely packed within a virus, it can behave like grains of sand or toothpaste in a tube. That's essentially what biophysicists at UC San Diego discovered when they began closely examining the physical properties of DNA jammed inside viruses
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Nature Neuroscience
Neuroscientists find evidence for 'visual stereotyping'
The stereotypes we hold can influence our brain's visual system, prompting us to see others' faces in ways that conform to these stereotypes, neuroscientists at New York University have found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Indiana University researchers find Earth may be home to 1 trillion species
Earth could contain nearly 1 trillion species, with only one-thousandth of 1 percent now identified, according to a study from biologists at Indiana University. The estimate, based on the intersection of large datasets and universal scaling laws, appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Kevin Fryling
kfryling@iu.edu
812-856-2988
Indiana University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2016
Advanced Optical Materials
Light-powered 3-D printer creates terahertz lens
Created from a 3-D printed metamaterial, the new lens could be used for biomedical research and security imaging.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2016
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops
Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis are using nanoparticle technology in an effort to meet the ever-increasing demand for food. Their innovative technique boosts the growth of a protein-rich bean by improving the way it absorbs nutrients, while reducing the need for fertilizer.
National Science Foundation, National Agricultural Innovation Project, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Government of India

Contact: Erika Ebsworth-Goold
eebsworth-goold@wustl.edu
314-935-2914
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Journal of Cell Biology
A cell senses its own curves: New research from the MBL Whitman Center
Septin proteins in human and fungal cells can sense micron-scaled curves in the cell membrane, scientists from Dartmouth College and the Marine Biological Laboratory discover.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Advanced Materials
Personal cooling units on the horizon
Firefighters entering burning buildings, athletes competing in the broiling sun and workers in foundries may eventually be able to carry their own, lightweight cooling units with them, thanks to a nanowire array that cools, according to Penn State materials researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Nature Materials
Shape of tumor may affect whether cells can metastasize
Only a few cells in a cancerous tumor are able to break away and spread to other parts of the body, but the curve along the edge of the tumor may play a large role in activating these tumor-seeding cells, according to a new University of Illinois study.
American Cancer Society, National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Molecular Systems Biology
Scientists predict cell changes that affect breast cancer growth
Using a broad spectrum of analytical tools, scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have shown how sometimes small, often practically imperceptible, structural changes in a key breast cancer receptor are directly linked to regulating molecules and can produce predictable effects in curbing or accelerating cancer growth.
National Institutes of Health, Frenchman's Creek Women for Cancer Research, BallenIsles Men's Golf Association, National Science Foundation, National Science Foundation of China, Key Project of Ministry of Education, and others

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Annals of Glaciology
Ice loss accelerating in Greenland's coastal glaciers, Dartmouth study finds
Surface meltwater draining through and underneath Greenland's tidewater glaciers is accelerating their loss of ice mass, according to a Dartmouth study that sheds light on the relationship between meltwater and subglacial discharge.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Science
New study exposes growing problem of patent aggregators and negative impact on innovation
In theory, the rise in patent litigation could reflect growth in the commercialization of technology and innovation, as lawsuits increase proportionately as more and more companies turn to intellectual property (IP) protection to safeguard their competitive advantages. In reality, however, it's a very different story. The authors point out that the majority of recent patent litigation has been driven by 'nonpracticing entities' (NPEs) -- firms that generate no products but instead amass patent portfolios just for the sake of enforcing IP rights.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Aisner
jaisner@hbs.edu
617-495-6157
Harvard Business School

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Bacteria beneficial to plants have spread across California
Scientists at the University of California, Riverside have discovered that a strain of beneficial nitrogen-fixing bacteria has spread across California, demonstrating that beneficial bacteria can share some of the same features that are characteristic of pathogens. The bacteria, called Bradyrhizobium, form tumor-like nodules on the roots of plants and are able to 'fix' nitrogen by breaking it down and rendering it into forms that plants can easily metabolize.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Protecting diversity on coral reefs: DNA may hold the key
Research published today by a team of scientists discovered that large areas of intact coral reef with extensive live coral cover, not disturbed by humans or climate change, harbor the greatest amount of genetic diversity. With this work, the researchers uncovered a link between species diversity of an ecosystem and the genetic diversity encoded within the DNA of those species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Study reveals COPD linked to increased bacterial invasion
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common smoking-related lung illness and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Scientists have long believed that inhaling toxic gases and particles from tobacco smoke causes inflammation of the small airways in the lungs, leading to the development of COPD. However, the theory doesn't explain why airway inflammation and disease progression continue even after the patient stops smoking.
National Institutes of Health, American Lung Association, National Science Foundation, Department of Veterans Affairs, Forest Research Institute

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Showing releases 676-700 out of 840.

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