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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 840.

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Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research outlines cellular communication processes that make life possible
Researchers have discovered a mechanism of intercellular communication that helps explain how biological systems and actions -- ranging from a beating heart to the ability to hit a home run -- function properly most of the time, and in some scenarios quite remarkably.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bo Sun
sunb@physics.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8203
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change has less impact on drought than previously expected
As a multiyear drought grinds on in the Southwestern United States, many wonder about the impact of global climate change on more frequent and longer dry spells. As humans emit more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, how will water supply for people, farms, and forests be affected?
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@uci.edu
949-824-8249
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 29-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Plants' future water use affects long-term drought estimates
Studies have estimated that more than 70 percent of our planet will experience more drought under a quadrupling of CO2. But those studies ignore the fact that plants will use less water when carbon is more abundant.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Cave study designed to solve puzzle of prehistoric megadroughts in western US
A paleoclimatic cave study in California is designed to identify the factors that made megadroughts commonplace in the western US from 5,000 to 8,000 years ago.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David F. Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Science
Electrons at the speed limit
Electronic components have become faster and faster over the years, thus making powerful computers and other technologies possible. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now investigated how fast electrons can ultimately be controlled with electric fields. Their insights are of importance for the petahertz electronics of the future.
National Center of Competence in Research Molecular Ultrafast Science and Technology, Swiss National Science Foundation, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Contact: Dr. Ursula Keller
keller@phys.ethz.ch
41-446-332-146
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security
Researchers find vulnerabilities in iPhone, iPad operating system
An international team of computer science researchers has identified serious security vulnerabilities in the iOS -- the operating system used in Apple's iPhone and iPad devices. The vulnerabilities make a variety of attacks possible.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Virtual peer pressure works just as well as the real thing
Peer pressure is a proven social motivator. Researchers probed this decidedly human attribute and found that not only is virtual pressure from a computer-simulated peer just as motivating as the real thing, but that 'fake' competition is effective as well. Researchers formulated a mathematical model of human behavior that successfully predicted group responses across conditions -- one they hope researchers will use to overcome the difficult task of encouraging participation in scientific projects.
National Science Foundation, Mitsui USA Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
646-997-3792
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
What makes Southerners sound southern?
Linguistic researchers will be isolating and identifying the specific variations in speech that make Southerners sound Southern.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Alan Flurry
aflurry@uga.edu
706-542-3331
University of Georgia

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Environmental Health Perspectives
Study: Unconventional natural gas wells associated with migraine, fatigue
New research suggests that Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing ('fracking') industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms and severe fatigue.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Degenstein Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
PLOS Computational Biology
Targeting low-oxygen patches inside lung cancer tumors could help prevent drug resistance
With the right treatment schedule, medications known as hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) could help prevent drug resistance in a subtype of lung cancer, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jasmine Foo
jyfoo@math.umn.edu
508-471-0950
PLOS

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Environmental Science & Technology
Ecological consequences of amphetamine pollution in urban streams
Pharmaceutical and illicit drugs are present in streams in Baltimore, Maryland. At some sites, amphetamine concentrations are high enough to alter the base of the aquatic food web. So reports a new study released today in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, which is one of the first to explore the ecological consequences of stimulant pollution in urban streams.
Wallace Genetic Foundation, NSF/Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research Program, and Hudson River Foundation

Contact: Lori M. Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x233
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Can you hear me now? CSU research could help miners stay safe
The National Science Foundation has awarded a three-year, $750,000 grant to a team led by Colorado State University's Sudeep Pasricha for developing a communications system for miners.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anne Ju Manning
anne.manning@colostate.edu
970-491-7099
Colorado State University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Physical Review Letters
Can 1 cosmic enigma help solve another?
Astrophysicists have proposed a clever new way to shed light on the mystery of dark matter, believed to make up most of the universe. The irony is they want to try to pin down the nature of this unexplained phenomenon by using another, an obscure cosmic emanation known as 'fast radio bursts.'
National Science Foundation, NASA, John Templeton Foundation, Simons Foundation

Contact: Arthur Hirsch
ahirsch6@jhu.edu
443-997-9909
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Science Advances
Whiskers help animals sense the direction of the wind
A new study finds that rats use information from their whiskers to localize an airflow source, suggesting designs for new types of sensors.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Neuroscientists receive NSF grant to study evolution of brain to support technological learning
The Center for Behavioral Neuroscience (CBN) at Georgia State University has received a three-year, $970,704 grant from the National Science Foundation to investigate how the human brain has evolved to support technological learning.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Natasha De Veauuse Brown, MPH
ndeveauusebrown@gsu.edu
404-413-3602
Georgia State University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
ACS Central Science
New electrical energy storage material shows its power
A new material developed by Northwestern University chemist William Dichtel and his team could one day speed up the charging process of electric cars and help increase their driving range. The modified covalent organic framework (COF) material combines the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy or charge, like a battery, and the ability to charge and discharge rapidly, like a supercapacitor, into one device. The researchers built a prototype device capable of powering an LED for 30 seconds.
National Science Foundation, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Engineering Structures
Post-disaster optimization technique capable of analyzing entire cities
Paolo Bocchini and his colleague Aman Karamlou of Lehigh University have created a novel method that represents a major improvement in existing post-disaster optimization methodologies. Their technique, Algorithm with Multiple-Input Genetic Operators (AMIGO)is described in a paper published in Engineering Structures. AMIGO is designed to consider very complex objectives while keeping computational costs down. In addition to being the first model to factor in so many elements, AMIGO is unique for its versatility.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
Bio-inspired tire design: Where the rubber meets the road
Anand Jagota, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and director of Lehigh's bioengineering program, and his team recently published a paper in Scientific Reports outlining their work creating new bio-inspired film-terminated structures with unique friction characteristics that could have positive industrial implications for, among other things, tires. The paper was co-written by Jagota and lead author Zhenping He along with Ying Bai, Chung-Yuen Hui of Cornell University and Benjamin Levrard, a researcher at Michelin Corporation.
Michelin® International Corporation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Journal of the Electrochemical Society
Lehigh engineer discovers a high-speed nano-avalanche
Doctoral student Charles McLaren and Professor Himanshu Jain from Lehigh University -- along with colleagues at the University of Marburg in Germany -- have published new findings in the September 2016 issue of the Journal of Electrochemical Society about the process involving transformations in glass that occur under intense electrical and thermal conditions. New understanding of these mechanisms could lead the way to more energy-efficient glass manufacturing, and even glass supercapacitors that leapfrog the performance of batteries now used for electric cars and solar energy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Nature
The first autonomous, entirely soft robot
A team of Harvard University researchers with expertise in 3-D printing, mechanical engineering, and microfluidics has demonstrated the first autonomous, untethered, entirely soft robot. This small, 3-D-printed robot -- nicknamed the octobot -- could pave the way for a new generation of completely soft, autonomous machines.
National Science Foundation through the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at Harvard and by the Wyss Institute

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Journal of Higher Education Management
Lacking other meaningful data, university faculty devise their own evaluation systems
Faculty teaching in the STEM disciplines at large research universities are devising their own systems to collect instructional data from their classrooms and using that data to inform their teaching.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jana Bouwma-Gearhart
Jana.Bouwma-Gearhart@oregonstate.edu
541-737-2206
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Darwin's theory about 'impassable' marine barrier holds true for coral larvae in the Pacific
An international team of scientists used a state-of-the-art computer model, a high-powered supercomputer, and five billion 'virtual' coral larvae to test Charles Darwin's 1880 hypothesis that marine species cannot cross the Eastern Pacific's 'impassable' marine barrier. The team, which included University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Associate Professor Claire Paris, found that Darwin's theory still hold true today even under extreme El Niņo conditions known to speed up ocean currents.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
ACS Synthetic Biology
Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube
Duke University researchers have created strands of synthetic DNA that, when mixed together in a test tube in the right concentrations, form an analog circuit that can add, subtract and multiply as the molecules form and break bonds. While most DNA circuits are digital, their device performs calculations in an analog fashion by measuring the varying concentrations of specific DNA molecules directly, without requiring special circuitry to convert them to zeroes and ones first.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Scientists to study how rice adapts in salty soil under $4 million NSF grant
A team of scientists will study the response of rice, a food staple for half the world's population, in saline soil conditions under a four-year, $4 million grant from the National Science Foundation's Plant Genome Research Program.
National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials
Researchers have developed a novel approach to characterizing how atoms are arranged in materials, using Bayesian statistical methods to glean new insights into the structure of materials. The work should inform the development of new materials for use in a variety of applications.
National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Showing releases 76-100 out of 840.

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