Public Release: 

Medical Tip Sheet From Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

INTRAOPERATIVE DUPLEX SCANNING USED FOR THE FIRST TIME ON CARJACKING VICTIM WITH BRAIN, CHEST INJURIES

A new type of technologyknown as intraoperative Duplex Scanning was used for the first time at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in August, and played an important role in saving the life of a carjacking victim who had been shot in the head and in the chest. Duplex scans combine doppler and ultrasound imaging t echnology, giving the physician both auditory and visual images of blood flow, enabling him or her to distinguish between blood vessels and other types of tissues.

Available for interviews: Hrayr Shahinian, M.D., Director, Skull Base Institute

CEDARS-SINAI SCIENTIST FINDS MALIGNANCY GENE IN TUMOR CELLS

A scientist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center has discovered a gene that exists in malignant tumors of the brain, liver, breast, colon, kidney and reproductive organs, but not in healthy adults, stirring hopes that a vital key to cancer development and progression may have been unmasked. Julia Y. Ljubimova, M.D., Ph.D., a cancer researcher in the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, announced the discovery of a novel human malignancy-associated gene (MAG) in the October issue of Cancer Research.

Available for interviews: Julia Y. Ljubimova, M.D., Ph.D.

FIRST HEART/LIVER TRANSPLANT IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES DONE AT CEDARS-SINAI

In a 12-hour procedure that began at 10 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 24, 1998, two organ transplant teams at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center gave a 36-year-old woman a new heart and liver. This is the first time that such a double organ transplant has been done in the Western United States.

Available for interviews: Lawrence Czer, M.D.; Steven Colquhoun, M.D.; Carlos Blanche, M.D.

HUMAN BRAIN TRANSPLANTATION PROTOCOL APPROVED TO REVERSE NERVE AND BRAIN DAMAGE

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center are ready to start a human treatment protocol that can reverse nerve and brain damage caused by stroke, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy and spinal cord injuries. The treatment involves removal and regeneration of carefully targeted brain cells, which are then re-introduced into the patient, where growth continues and the brain is repaired.

Available for interviews: Michel Levesque, M.D., Director, Neurofunctional Surgery Center; Toomas Neuman, Ph.D., Director, Neurobiology

MINIMALLY INVASIVE, FULLY ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURE MAY RESULT IN SAME-DAY SKULL BASE SURGERY

A new type of minimally invasive, fully endoscopic skull base surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center gives surgeons a panoramic view of pituitary tumor sites and results in reduced operating time, fewer complications, less discomfort for the patient and a dramatically shorter length-of-stay. A 42-year-old woman from Indiana had surgery 11/04, and is anticipated to be released 11/06, flying home to Coatesville on 11/08. She is available for interviews, as is the skull base surgeon.

Available for interviews: Hrayr Shahinian, M.D., Director, Skull Base Institute; Pamela Tipton, patient

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For media information and to arrange an interview, please call 1-800-396-1002.

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