Public Release: 

Chemical & Engineering News column receives virtual recognition

American Chemical Society

What do you call a column that explores the chemistry behind everything from that new car smell to sunscreen to Cheeze Whiz™ and baseballs? Chemical & Engineering News calls it "What's That Stuff?". Scientific American magazine calls it one of the 50 best Web resources for science and technology.

This month, "What's That Stuff?", an innovative feature appearing in Chemical & Engineering News and Chemical & Engineering News Online, received the Sci/Tech Web Award 2002, from Scientific American magazine and ScientificAmerican.com, the magazine's online component.

To select the top 50 websites, editors of Scientific American reviewed hundreds of Web sites in the following categories: archeology and paleontology; astronomy and astrophysics; biology; chemistry; computer science; earth and environment; engineering and technology; mathematics; medicine; and physics.

"What's That Stuff?" is recognized as one of five of the best information sources in chemistry for a broad audience, including scientists, students, educators and industry professionals. "The Sci/Tech Web Awards highlight science and technology sites that are informative, interesting and fun," explained Mina Lux, managing director of ScientificAmerican.com.

"Readers have told me they really enjoy 'What's That Stuff?'" says Madeleine Jacobs, editor in chief of Chemical & Engineering News. "They share the columns with their friends and coworkers, and they show them to their children and their children's teachers. Everyone seems to be fascinated to learn about the chemistry of everyday and often mundane materials."

To visit the "What's That Stuff?" Web site, go to Chemical & Engineering News Online at http://pubs.acs.org/cen/index.html and click on "What's That Stuff?".

ScientificAmerican.com's list of top 50 science and technology Web sites can be found at http://www.scientificamerican.com.

Chemical & Engineering News is a weekly newsmagazine published by the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

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