Public Release: 

Sex-based differences in environmental exposures and health

Conference accessible via webcast

Society for Women's Health Research

Research efforts are beginning to show that environmental exposures can affect women and men differently. In some cases, differences are due to the fact that one sex has more exposure to a toxin than the other. In many cases, however, it is because men and women's bodies respond differently to a given toxin.

Environmental exposures can have serious consequences including reproductive disorders, immune dysfunction, cancer, and behavioral and developmental disorders. Discussions will include issues of sex differences in toxicology research, the design and conduct of epidemiologic studies to determine sex differences in biological responses to environmental substances, and the latest findings on how environmental exposures can impact human health.

Held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, NC, the conference will be available via Webcast at www.womens-health.org, where there is a link to the Webcast section. Please note: Viewing the Webcast requires QuickTime 6.

The following speakers will give presentations. For a complete agenda, bios, presentation topics and times, visit www.womens-health.org.

  • James Huff, PhD, National Institutes of Environmental Health Science
  • Kent Hunter, PhD, National Cancer Institute
  • Mary Jane Cunningham, PhD, Molecular Mining Corporation
  • Brent Palmer, PhD, University of Kentucky
  • Alan Silverstone, PhD, State University of New York Health Science Center
  • Ellen Silbergeld, PhD, University of Maryland School of Medicine
  • Mary Beth Martin, PhD, Georgetown University Medical Center
  • Bernard Weiss, PhD, University of Rochester School of Medicine

The meeting is co-sponsored and funded in part by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. It is one of the Society for Women's Health Research's regional Scientific Advisory Meetings designed to educate scientists, health care providers and the public about important sex-based biological differences relating to a variety of diseases and developmental processes. Held across the country, the meetings are in response to the April 2001 Institute of Medicine report, "Exploring the Biological Contributions to Human Health: Does Sex Matter?" This report reinforced the Society's message that biologic sex matters when it comes to health.

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