Public Release: 

Stumbling on happiness

Daniel Gilbert will discuss ground breaking research on how people make judgments at APS 19th Annual Convention

Association for Psychological Science

Daniel Gilbert, a leader in the field of affective forecasting, will be this year's "Bring the Family" speaker at the 19th annual Association for Psychological Science conference, May 24-27 in Washington, DC. Gilbert is the author of the critically acclaimed 2006 national bestseller "Stumbling on Happiness" and will discuss his own ground breaking research on how people make judgments, choices and decisions and its implications on our own feelings of happiness. Here is a brief preview of what to expect from Gilbert, in his own words:

"Most of us spend our days doing nice things for the people we are about to become - working, saving, and flossing so that our future selves will be happy and grateful. It doesn't always work out that way. Why do we so often mispredict what will make our future selves happy" This lecture answers their question."

Gilbert is professor of psychology at Harvard University where he also directs the Hedonic Psychology laboratory. In addition to his book writing and many scholarly publications, Gilbert has written articles for Time, Forbes, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.

Don't miss the opportunity to see an acclaimed speaker touch upon a fundamental but enigmatic characteristic of life at APS's 19th annual convention.

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For more information on the APS 19th Annual Convention and to browse the interactive program, please visit: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/convention.

Members of the media receive a complimentary registration. To register, e-mail your contact information, including your name, name of your organization, address, phone and e-mail to media@psychologicalscience.org.

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