Public Release: 

Maths plus 'geeky' images equals deterred students

Economic & Social Research Council

Images of maths 'geeks' stop people from studying mathematics or using it in later life, shows research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Many students and undergraduates seem to think of mathematicians as old, white, middle-class men who are obsessed with their subject, lack social skills and have no personal life outside maths. The student's views of maths itself included narrow and inaccurate images that are often limited to numbers and basic arithmetic.

The research revealed that many of the clichéd perceptions which it identified are linked to the way in which mathematics and mathematicians are presented in popular culture. Although there has been an increase since 2006, the number of people in England and Wales choosing to study maths has been in decline in the last decade. The subject's negative portrayal in popular culture contributes to this lack of interest. The research went on to suggest using popular culture as one way to promote a more positive view of maths.

Dr Heather Mendick and Marie-Pierre Moreau from London Metropolitan together with Prof Debbie Epstein of Cardiff University undertook a survey, focus groups and interviews with GCSE school students, final year mathematics undergraduates and post and undergraduate students in the social sciences and humanities.

Dr Heather Mendick, who led the project, said: "Given the narrow, negative clichés associated with maths and mathematicians, it is hardly surprising that relatively few young people want to continue with the subject.

Dr Mendick continues "a substantial majority of both Year 11 and university students saw maths as little more than numbers and mathematicians as old, white, middle-class men"

The notion of mathematicians as geeks was common both among those who identified with the subject and those who did not. Images of mathematicians Albert Einstein and John Nash were labelled as not normal, lacking social skills and being obsessive towards mathematics. But those students who chose to continue studying mathematics for A-level or at university were more likely to regard this obsession as indicating skill, commitment or devotion than madness. Some mathematics undergraduates - more particularly males - gave positive value to geek status, even though several went to considerable lengths to claim their own normality.

Dr Mendick concludes "This raises two important issues: first, we can see how popular culture is deterring many people from enjoying maths and wanting to carry on with it and, second, it raises issues in relation to social justice as these images are mainly of white, middle-class men and so may discourage other groups disproportionately."

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Heather Mendick (Work Tel: 02071332014, Mobile Tel: 07748187216, email: heathermendick@yahoo.co.uk)
ESRC Press Office:
Kelly Barnett (Tel: 01793 413032 / 07826874166, email:kelly.barnett@esrc.ac.uk)
Danielle Moore (Tel: 01793 413122, email: danielle.moore@esrc.ac.uk)

NOTES FOR EDITORS:

1. The research, 'Mathematical Images and Identities: Education, Entertainment, Social Justice', was conducted by Dr Mendick and Marie-Pierre Moreau of the Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, and Prof Debbie Epstein of Cardiff University.

2. The research was based at the Institute for Policy Studies in Education (IPSE) at London Metropolitan University. IPSE is an interdisciplinary research institute with diverse, highly qualified and experienced staff. It is committed to researching the social impacts of education policy and practice. With funding from international and national bodies including research councils, major charities and government departments IPSE has research expertise across all sectors and contexts, from early years to informal adult learning

3. The research involved collecting survey, textual, focus group and interview data.

4. The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK's largest funding agency for research and postgraduate training relating to social and economic issues. It supports independent, high quality research which impacts on business, the public sector and the third sector. The ESRC's planned total expenditure in 2008/09 is £203 million. At any one time the ESRC supports over 4,000 researchers and postgraduate students in academic institutions and research policy institutes. More at http://www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk

5. ESRC Society Today offers free access to a broad range of social science research and presents it in a way that makes it easy to navigate and saves users valuable time. As well as bringing together all ESRC-funded research and key online resources such as the Social Science Information Gateway and the UK Data Archive, non-ESRC resources are included, for example the Office for National Statistics. The portal provides access to early findings and research summaries, as well as full texts and original datasets through integrated search facilities. More at http://www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk

6. The ESRC confirms the quality of its funded research by evaluating research projects through a process of peers review. This research has been graded as Outstanding.

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