Public Release: 

American Society for Microbiology honors Arturo Casadevall

American Society for Microbiology

Washington, DC--May 28, 2008--The 2008 American Society for Microbiology (ASM) William A. Hinton Research Training Award is being presented to Arturo Casadevall, Chair, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, New York. This award recognizes outstanding contributions toward fostering the research training of underrepresented minorities in microbiology.

Dr. Casadevall has provided exemplary training and mentoring to a significant number of minority scientists, and himself served as a role model of success. He is the first Hispanic Department Chair at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and has been recognized by the Hispanic Center for Excellence at Einstein for training minority students. Among Dr. Casadevall's trainees, nearly half are members of underrepresented minority groups, and more than half are women. The professional accomplishments of these young scientists are testaments to the supportive, nurturing, and individualized environment he creates for each student, as well as the scientific rigor and excellence they encounter in the laboratory. Dr. Casadevall has received numerous honors for his groundbreaking work in the field of infectious diseases, including a 2007 NIH Merit Award. He is also President of the Medical Mycology Society of America, Chair of the ASM Career Development Committee, Co-Chair of the NIAID Board of Scientific Counselors, a member of the American Association of Physicians, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology.

Dr. Casadevall received his B.A. in Chemistry from Queens College, City University of New York, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from New York University.

The William A. Hinton Research Training Award will be presented during the 108th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), June 1 - June 5, 2008 in Boston, Massachusetts. ASM is the world's oldest and largest life science organization and has more than 43,000 members worldwide. ASM's mission is to advance the microbiological sciences and promote the use of scientific knowledge for improved health and economic and environmental well-being.

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