Public Release: 

Certain skills are predictors of reading ability in young children

Measures of phonological awareness distinguished reading-disabled children in pre-K and pre-1

Wiley

Orono, ME - November 20, 2008 - A new study in the journal Learning Disabilities Research & Practice reveals that differences found between pre-kindergarten reading-disabled children and their typically reading peers diminish in various measures by pre-first grade, with the exception of phonological awareness abilities.

Susan Lambrecht Smith, Kathleen A. Scott, Jenny Roberts, and John L. Locke assessed children's alphabetic knowledge, phonological awareness (known as the conscious sensitivity to the sound structure of language), and rapid naming skills at the beginning of kindergarten and again prior to first grade as a function of later reading outcomes.

Results show that prior to kindergarten, children with reading disabilities were distinguished from their typically developing reading counterparts by their performance on tasks of letter knowledge, phonological awareness, and rapid naming skills. However, between these groups, only differences in skills related to phonological awareness persisted beyond the kindergarten year.

Measures of phonological awareness distinguished the reading disabled group from the control group at Pre-K and Pre-1. These results are consistent with observations that phonological awareness is a strong predictor of reading disability in both children at general risk and genetic risk of reading difficulty.

"Our findings have implications not only for initial assessment and identification, but also for how progress in early literacy skills is viewed," the authors conclude.

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This study is published in the journal Learning Disabilities Research & Practice. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact journalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Susan Lambrecht Smith is affiliated with the University of Maine, Orono and can be reached for questions at susan.lambrecht.smith@umit.maine.edu.

Learning Disabilities Research & Practice (LDRP) publishes research articles addressing the nature and characteristics of children and adults with learning disabilities, program development, assessment practices, and instruction. In so doing, LDRP provides valuable information to professionals involved in a variety of different disciplines including special education, school psychology, counseling, reading, and medicine.

Wiley-Blackwell was formed in February 2007 as a result of the acquisition of Blackwell Publishing Ltd. by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and its merger with Wiley's Scientific, Technical, and Medical business. Together, the companies have created a global publishing business with deep strength in every major academic and professional field. Wiley-Blackwell publishes approximately 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive collection of books with global appeal. For more information on Wiley-Blackwell, please visit www.wiley-blackwell.com or http://interscience.wiley.com.

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