Public Release: 

Fetal health affected by mother's diet

JCI Journals

In the United States, there has been a recent dramatic rise in the number of children classified as obese and diagnosed with obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). One factor thought to contribute to this rise is obesity of the mother during pregnancy. However, a team of researchers, at Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, have found the offspring of both lean and obese nonhuman primate mothers chronically consuming a high-fat diet exhibited an increased risk of developing NAFLD. Importantly, if mothers fed a high-fat diet were reverted to a low-fat diet during a subsequent pregnancy, this second offspring exhibited fewer signs of NAFLD. The team, led by Kevin Grove and Jacob Friedman, therefore suggests that a developing fetus is highly susceptible to maternal consumption of excess fat, whether or not the mother is obese, and that a healthy maternal diet is most important for the obesity-related health of a developing fetus.

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TITLE: Maternal high-fat diet triggers lipotoxicity in the fetal livers of nonhuman primates

AUTHOR CONTACT:
Kevin L. Grove
Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, Oregon, USA.
Phone: (503) 690-5380; Fax: (503) 690-5384; E-mail: grovek@ohsu.edu.

Jacob E. Friedman,
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
Phone: (303) 724-3983; Fax: (303) 724-3920; E-mail: jed.friedman@ucdenver.edu.

View the PDF of this article at: https://www.the-jci.org/article.php?id=32661

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