Public Release: 

Study uses bone marrow stem cells to regenerate skin

New study suggests that adult bone marrow stem cells can be used in the construction of artificial skin

Wiley

Xi'an, China - January 14, 2009 - A new study suggests that adult bone marrow stem cells can be used in the construction of artificial skin. The findings mark an advancement in wound healing and may be used to pioneer a method of organ reconstruction. The study is published in Artificial Organs, official journal of the International Federation for Artificial Organs (IFAO), the The International Faculty for Artificial Organs (INFA) and the International Society for Rotary Blood Pumps (ISRBP).

To investigate the practicability of repairing burn wounds with tissue-engineered skin combined with bone marrow stem cells, the study established a burn wound model in the skin of pigs, which is known to be anatomically and physiologically similar to human skin.

Engineering technology and biomedical theory methods were used to make artificial skin with natural materials and bone marrow derived stem cells. Once the artificial skin was attached to the patient and the dermal layer had begun to regenerate, stem cells were differentiated into skin cells. The cells are self-renewing and raise the quality of healing in wound healing therapy. When grafted to the burn wounds, the engineered skin containing stem cells showed better healing, less wound contraction and better development of blood vessels.

Skin, the human body's largest organ, protects the body from disease and physical damage, and helps to regulate body temperature. When the skin has been seriously damaged through disease or burns, the body often cannot act fast enough to repair them. Burn victims may die from infection and the loss of plasma. Skin grafts were originally developed as a way to prevent such consequences.

"We hope that this so-called 'engineered structural tissue' will someday replace plastic and metal prostheses currently used to replace damaged joints and bones by suitable materials and stem cells," says Yan Jin of the Fourth Military Medical University, lead author of the study.

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This study is published in Artificial Organs. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Yan Jin is a chair professor and director of the Department of Oral Histology and Pathology of the School of Stomatology, and director of the Center of Tissue Engineering at the Fourth Military Medical University and can be reached for questions at yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn.

Since 1977, Artificial Organs has been publishing original articles featuring the studies of design, performance, and evaluation of the biomaterials and devices for the international medical, scientific, and engineering communities involved in the research and clinical application of artificial organ development. Artificial Organs, published monthly, brings its readership the depth and breadth of the science and technology that continues to advance the Replacement, Recovery and Regeneration of organ systems. For more information, please visit www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118539732/home.

Wiley-Blackwell was formed in February 2007 as a result of the acquisition of Blackwell Publishing Ltd. by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and its merger with Wiley's Scientific, Technical, and Medical business. Together, the companies have created a global publishing business with deep strength in every major academic and professional field. Wiley-Blackwell publishes approximately 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive collection of books with global appeal. For more information on Wiley-Blackwell, please visit www.wiley-blackwell.com or http://interscience.wiley.com.

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