Public Release: 

Special issue of NeuroRehabilitation focuses on hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries

IOS Press

Amsterdam, February 22, 2010 - IOS Press announces publication of a special issue of NeuroRehabilitation: An International Journal (NRE) devoted specifically to hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI-BI), a significant disruption of brain function due to a deficient supply of oxygen to the brain. This is the first publication to present a consolidated overview of HI-BI. It provides a thorough review of neuropathophysiology, neuroimaging assessment, and evaluation and management of the neurological and neurobehavioral sequelae of these injuries in adults and children.

"This special issue of NeuroRehabilitation on hypoxic-ischemic brain injury will serve as an excellent resource for clinicians assessing and treating this unique patient group given the absence of a comprehensive source of clinical information of this scope and detail," comments NRE Co-Editor Nathan Zasler, MD, FAAPM&R, FACRM, CBIST, CEO and Medical Director of Tree of Life Services, Inc and Concussion Care Centre of Virginia, Ltd., as well as Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.

Guest Editor of this special issue David B. Arciniegas, Director of the Neurobehavioral Disorders Program and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine; and Medical Director, Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit, HealthONE Spalding Rehabilitation Hospital, talks about the challenges of treating patients with HI-BI. He states, "As with the approach to HI-BI adopted in the TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) Act of 2008, applying a certain measure of care-by-analogy is understandable and unavoidable - doing so allows those of us working with persons with HI-BI and their families to organize and deliver care that supports their neurological and functional recovery, assists with adaptation to disability, and, to the greatest extent possible, facilitates re-entry into the community and workforce. ..."We hope that our readers and others interested in this subject will find this issue of NeuroRehabilitation informative and useful."

The issue includes contributions by globally recognized experts:

  • Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: Addressing the disconnect between pathophysiology and public policy
    David B. Arciniegas, HealthONE Spalding Rehabilitation Hospital and University of Colorado Denver, introduces the issue and defines the set of clinical conditions within the spectrum of HI-BI.

  • Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury - pathophysiology, neuropathology and mechanisms
    Katharina M. Busl, Massachusetts General Hospital, and David M. Greer, Harvard Medical School, contribute a critical overview of the pathophysiology of HI-BI.

  • Neuroimaging of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury
    Deborah M. Little, Marilyn F. Kraus, Catherine Jiam, Michael Moynihan, Michelle Siroko, Evan Schulze and Elizabeth K. Geary, University of Illinois College of Medicine, discuss current neuroimaging techniques and their current and potential applications to the clinical evaluation of persons with HI-BI.

  • Neurocognitive outcomes following neonatal encephalopathy
    Jennifer Armstrong-Wells, Timothy J. Bernard, Richard Boada and Marilyn Manco-Johnson, The Children's Hospital and the University of Colorado Denver, focus on perinatal HI-BI, or neonatal encephalopathy.

  • Neurological sequelae of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury
    Christine Lu-Emerson and Sandeep Khot, University of Washington, explore the neurological aftermath of HI-BI injuries.

  • Cognitive sequelae of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: A review
    C. Alan Anderson, Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Colorado Denver, and David B. Arciniegas, HealthONE Spalding Rehabilitation Hospital and University of Colorado Denver, offer a review of the broad spectrum of post-hypoxic cognitive impairments and their treatments.

  • The syndrome of delayed post-hypoxic leukoencephalopathy
    David Shprecher University of Utah and Lahar Mehta Evergreen Neuroscience Institute, address the under-recognized problem of delayed post-hypoxic leukoencephalopathy.

  • Hypobaric hypoxic cerebral insults: The neurological consequences of going higher
    Edward H. Maa, Denver Health and Hospitals and University of Colorado Denver, offers insights on hypobaric (high-altitude) HI-BI.

  • Neurological and neurobehavioral sequelae of obstructive sleep apnea
    Jean C.G. Tsai University of Colorado Denver, provides a thorough review of HI-BI consequences of OSA.

###

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.