Public Release: 

Inbreeding may have caused Darwin family ills

The Darwin/Wedgwood dynasty exhibits a link between inbreeding and child mortality

American Institute of Biological Sciences

Charles Darwin's worries about possible adverse effects of inbreeding in his family seem to have been justified, according to a study described in the May 2010 issue of BioScience. Darwin married his first cousin, Emma Wedgwood, and his mother, Susannah Wedgwood, was the daughter of third cousins. The study, which extended to 25 families including 176 children, found a statistical association between child mortality and the inbreeding coefficient of individuals in the Darwin/Wedgwood dynasty.

Charles Darwin demonstrated the phenomenon of inbreeding depression in many plants, and was aware of research into the effects of marriage between relatives on the health of resulting children. He feared that his marriage might have been responsible for some of his children's health problems and asked a member of Parliament to add a question about marriages to relatives to the British 1871 census form.

Three of Charles Darwin's 10 children died before reaching adulthood, one from childhood tuberculosis at age 10 and one from unknown causes as an infant. A third child, who died in infancy of scarlet fever, appears in a photograph to have developmental abnormalities. Inbreeding is an important risk factor in a number of human diseases, including infectious diseases. The authors of the study, Tim M. Berra, Gonzalo Alvarez, and Francisco C. Ceballos, suggest that the expression of deleterious genes "produced by consanguineous marriages could be involved in the high childhood mortality experienced by Darwin progeny." Furthermore, three of Darwin's six children with long-term marriages left no offspring. Unexplained infertility may also be a consequence of a consanguineous marriage. On the other hand, three of Darwin's sons were fellows of the Royal Society and were knighted by Queen Victoria.

###

After noon EST on 3 May and until early June, the full text of the article will be available for free download through the copy of this press release available at www.aibs.org/bioscience-press-releases/.

BioScience, published 11 times per year, is the journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). BioScience publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles covering a wide range of biological fields, with a focus on "Organisms from Molecules to the Environment." The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is an umbrella organization for professional scientific societies and organizations that are involved with biology. It represents some 200 member societies and organizations with a combined membership of about 250,000.

The complete list of peer-reviewed articles in the May 2010 issue of BioScience is as follows:

Applications of Microarrays for Crop Improvement: Here, There, and Everywhere by David W. Galbraith and Jeremy Edwards

Pest Risk Maps for Invasive Alien Species: A Roadmap for Improvement by Robert C. Venette and colleagues

Why Are Daphnia in Some Lakes Sicker? Disease Ecology, Habitat Structure, and the Plankton by Spencer R. Hall, Robyn Smyth, Claes R. Becker, Meghan A. Duffy, Christine J. Knight, Sally MacIntyre, Alan J. Tessier, and Carla E. Cáceres

Was the Darwin/Wedgwood Dynasty Adversely Affected by Consanguinity? by Tim M. Berra, Gonzalo Alvarez, and Francisco C. Ceballos

Got Hybridization? A Multidisciplinary Approach for Informing Science Policy by Norman C. Ellstrand and colleagues

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.