Public Release: 

Solid tumor modeling focus of workshops

National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

With high human mortality associated with cancerous tumors, there is a worldwide need for a better understanding of why a tumor starts to grow and what makes it continue to grow. Mathematical modeling can provide some of the answers.

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) is now accepting applications for its Investigative Workshop: Solid Tumor Modeling to be held Jan. 19-21, 2011, at NIMBioS on the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, campus. The principal aim of the workshop is to discuss current achievements and challenges in modeling solid tumors in the human body and to identify areas in modeling, computing, laboratory experimentation, and clinical diagnosis that should be pursued to improve the understanding of tumor development and ultimately treatment.

The focus will be on modeling tumor level cancer progression. However, all systems that influence growth will be open for discussion, including ongoing genetic mutation and genetic feedback, stem cells, angiogenesis and vascular dynamics, lymph system interaction, metastasis, mechanical properties of and interaction with host tissue, and immune system response. Topics of discussion may include hybrid and multi-scale modeling, multiphase modeling, parameter estimation and relevant experimental and clinical data collection, and high-performance computing and visualization.

The workshop is organized by Vittorio Cristini (Univ. of Texas, Houston); John Lowengrub (Univ. of California, Irvine); Kasia Rejniak (Moffitt Cancer Center); and Steven M. Wise (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville).

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NIMBioS Investigative Workshops involve 30-40 participants, of which about half are invited. Individuals with a strong interest in the topic can also apply to attend. For more information about the workshop, go to http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_tumor_modeling.html

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. NIMBioS is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

For more information, contact Catherine Crawley at 865-974-9350 or ccrawley@nimbios.org.

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