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'Pinkwashing' is a form of social injustice asserts article in Environmental Justice

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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IMAGE: Environmental Justice is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published quarterly in print and online. The journal encompasses study and debate on a broad range of environmental inequalities at the local, national,... view more

Credit: © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

New Rochelle, NY, July 7, 2011--Companies that try to increase sales of their products by adopting the color pink and pink ribbons to imply that they support breast cancer research--a practice called pinkwashing--but at the same time permit the use of chemicals shown to cause cancer are committing a form of social injustice against women, according to a thought-provoking article in Environmental Justice, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com) The entire issue is available online at www.liebertpub.com/env

Amy Lubitow, Portland State University (Oregon), and Mia Davis, Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (Boston, MA), contend that aligning oneself with a cause such as breast cancer, while carrying out research, manufacturing, or other types of policies or processes that involve the use of chemicals with a proven link to cancer crosses a critical line between just and unjust practices. The authors state that "pinkwashing simultaneously increases profits and potentially contributes to increasing cancer rates and obscures an environmental health discourse that recognizes the environmental causes of breast cancer..." They support and expand on this view in the article entitled, "Pastel Injustice: The Corporate Use of Pinkwashing for Profit."

"The authors of this article draw needed attention to the dangerous use of consumers' social and sometimes environmental consciousness by institutions who contribute to environmental health disparities. The blind financial support of these entities, by affected consumers, is a form of environmental injustice that is clearly elucidated by the authors," said Sylvia Hood Washington, PhD, ND, MSE, MPH, Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Justice, and Research Associate Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health.

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Environmental Justice is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published quarterly in print and online. The Journal encompasses study and debate on a broad range of environmental inequalities at the local, national, and global level tied to social, health, and economic equity. The Journal features studies that demonstrate the adverse effects on populations that are already at risk for health and environmental hazards, as well as the complicated issues inherent in remediation, funding, and relocation of facilities that pose hazardous risk to health. Complete tables of content and a free sample issue may be viewed online at www.liebertpub.com/env

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science, medicine, biomedical research, and law, including Sustainability: The Journal of Record, Environmental Engineering Science, and Ecopsychology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 60 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at www.liebertpub.com

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