Public Release: 

Cellular laser microsurgery illuminates research in vertebrate biology

The Optical Society

WASHINGTON, Aug. 17--Using an ultrafast femtosecond laser, researchers at Tufts University in Medford, Mass., were able to label, draw patterns on, and remove individual melanocytes cells from a species of frog tadpole (Xenopus) without damaging surrounding cells and tissues. Melanocytes are the cells responsible for skin pigment; they also are descendants of a specific type of stem cell that has regenerative potential and other characteristics similar to some cancer cells.

By precisely marking and ablating these cells, the researchers were able to track how melanocytes migrated and regenerated within a live organism. The researchers hope this technique will enable new avenues of research in wound repair, regenerative medicine, and cancer studies. The new method could also be used to study how certain organisms respond to spinal cord damage and how they are able to regenerate portions of their spinal cords.

According to the researchers, femtosecond lasers have already become important tools in biological studies because of the ability to affect highly localized tissues. The laser in their research, described in the August issue of the Optical Society's (OSA) open access journal Biomedical Optics Express, operated at a wavelength of 800 nm, which more readily affected melanocytes while protecting surrounding tissues. This highly selective characteristic enabled the study of cells both on the surface of the skin and in deeper tissue.

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Paper: "Patterned femtosecond-laser ablation of Xenopus Laevis melanocytes for studies of cell migration, wound repair, and developmental processes," Mondia et al., Biomedical Optics Express, Volume 2, Issue 8, pp. 2383-2391. http://www.opticsinfobase.org/boe/abstract.cfm?uri=boe-2-8-2383

EDITOR'S NOTE: This summary is part of OSA's monthly Biomedical Optics Express tip sheet. To subscribe, email astark@osa.org or follow @OpticalSociety on Twitter.

About Biomedical Optics Express

Biomedical Optics Express is OSA's principal outlet for serving the biomedical optics community with rapid, open-access, peer-reviewed papers related to optics, photonics and imaging in the life sciences. The journal scope encompasses theoretical modeling and simulations, technology development, and biomedical studies and clinical applications. It is published by the Optical Society and edited by Joseph A. Izatt of Duke University. Biomedical Optics Express is an open-access journal and is available at no cost to readers online at http://www.OpticsInfoBase.org/BOE.

About OSA

Uniting more than 106,000 professionals from 134 countries, the Optical Society (OSA) brings together the global optics community through its programs and initiatives. Since 1916 OSA has worked to advance the common interests of the field, providing educational resources to the scientists, engineers and business leaders who work in the field by promoting the science of light and the advanced technologies made possible by optics and photonics. OSA publications, events, technical groups and programs foster optics knowledge and scientific collaboration among all those with an interest in optics and photonics. For more information, visit www.osa.org.

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