Public Release: 

Scientists discover that specific antibodies halt Alzheimer's disease in mice

University College London

Antibodies that block the process of synapse disintegration in Alzheimer's disease have been identified, raising hopes for a treatment to combat early cognitive decline in the disease.

Alzheimer's disease is characterized by abnormal deposits in the brain of the protein Amyloid-ß, which induces the loss of connections between neurons, called synapses.

Now, scientists at UCL have discovered that specific antibodies that block the function of a related protein, called Dkk1, are able to completely suppress the toxic effect of Amyloid-ß on synapses. The findings are published today in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Dr Patricia Salinas, from the UCL Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, who led the study, said: "These novel findings raise the possibility that targeting this secreted Dkk1 protein could offer an effective treatment to protect synapses against the toxic effect of Amyloid-ß.

"Importantly, these results raise the hope for a treatment and perhaps the prevention of cognitive decline early in Alzheimer's disease."

Dkk1 is elevated in the brain biopsies of people with Alzheimer's disease but the significance of these findings was previously unknown. Scientists at UCL have found that Amyloid-ß causes the production of Dkk1, which in turn induces the dismantling of synapses (the connections between neurons) in the hippocampus, an area of the brain implicated in learning and memory.

In this paper, scientists conducted experiments to look at the progression of synapse disintegration of the hippocampus after exposure to Amyloid-ß, using brain slices from mice. They were able to monitor how many synapses survived in the presence of a specific antibody which targets Dkk1, compared to how many synapses were viable without the antibody.

The results show that the neurons that were exposed to the antibody remained healthy, with no synaptic disintegration.

Dr Salinas said: "Despite significant advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease, no effective treatment is currently available to stop the progression of this devastating disease."

She added: "This research identifies Dkk1 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease."

Alzheimer's represents 60% of all cases of dementia. Alzheimer's Research UK estimates that in the UK the annual national cost of all the dementias is around £23 billion, which represents double the costs for cancer and 3-5 times the costs for heart disease and stroke. New studies predict an increase in the number of Alzheimer's cases of epidemic proportions.

The research was funded by Alzheimer's Research UK, the UK's leading dementia research charity, and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK.

Dr Simon Ridley, Head of Research at Alzheimer's Research UK, said: "We're delighted to have supported this study, which sheds new light on the processes that occur as Alzheimer's develops. By understanding what happens in the brain during Alzheimer's, we stand a better chance of developing new treatments that could make a real difference to people with the disease.

"Studies like this are an essential part of that process, but more work is needed if we are to take these results from the lab bench to the clinic. Dementia can only be defeated through research, and with the numbers of people affected by the condition soaring, we urgently need to invest in research now."

###

Notes for Editors

1. For more information or to interview Dr Patricia Salinas, please contact Clare Ryan in the UCL Media Relations Office on tel: +44 (0)20 3108 3846, mobile: +44 (0)7747 565 056, out of hours +44 (0)7917 271 364, e-mail: clare.ryan@ucl.ac.uk.

2. To interview Dr Simon Ridley, please contact Kirsty Marais, Media Officer at Alzheimer's Research UK on 01223 843304, 07826 559233 or email press@alzheimersresearchuk.org

3. 'The Secreted Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 is required for Amyloid B-mediated synaptic loss' is published in the Journal of Neuroscience. Copies are available from UCL Media Relations.

About UCL (University College London)

Founded in 1826, UCL was the first English university established after Oxford and Cambridge, the first to admit students regardless of race, class, religion or gender, and the first to provide systematic teaching of law, architecture and medicine. We are among the world's top universities, as reflected by performance in a range of international rankings and tables. UCL currently has 24,000 students from almost 140 countries, and more than 9,500 employees. Our annual income is over £800 million.

www.ucl.ac.uk | Follow us on Twitter @uclnews

About Alzheimer's Research UK

About Alzheimer's Research UK is the UK's leading charity specializing in finding preventions, treatments and a cure for dementia.

To help us defeat dementia, donate today by visiting www.alzheimersresearcuk.org or calling 01223 843899.

We are currently supporting dementia research projects worth over £18 million in leading Universities across the UK.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.