Public Release: 

Pediatric epilepsy impacts sleep for the child and parents

Room sharing and co-sleeping decrease sleep quality, prevent restful sleep

Wiley

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital for Children in Boston have determined that pediatric epilepsy significantly impacts sleep patterns for the child and parents. According to the study available in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), sharing a room or co-sleeping with their child with epilepsy decreases the sleep quality and prevents restful sleep for parents.

Over 1% of children in the U.S. are diagnosed with epilepsy--a chronic, neurological disease characterized by recurring seizures. In families impacted by childhood epilepsy, both children and parents often have disrupted sleep patterns. Previous research has described a reciprocal interaction, where sleep patterns affect seizures and seizure profiles affect sleep. These prior studies have shown that sleep deprivation can trigger seizures, that sleep disorders can interfere with seizure control, and that epileptic discharge can disrupt sleep-wake cycles.

In the present study, Dr. Elizabeth Thiele and colleagues explore the impact of pediatric epilepsy on child and parental sleep quality, particularly as it relates to sleeping arrangements. Researchers included 105 households with epilepsy and 79 controls in this study. Parents of children between the ages of two and ten, with and without epilepsy, were surveyed to assess seizure history, child-parent sleep quality, and household sleep arrangements.

In this study, the mean age of seizure onset was 2.3 years, and 41% of patients had seizures within the first year of life. In patients with epilepsy, 64% had at least one seizure within the previous month and 37% reported having daily seizures. At least one antiepileptic drug was used in 91% of pediatric participants.

"Our study determined that households with a child with epilepsy had higher rates of parent-child room sharing and co-sleeping compared to controls," said Dr. Thiele. Close to 64% of parents who reported co-sleeping did not do so prior to onset of their child's seizures, and nearly 66% did not co-sleep with the child's sibling at the same age. A decreased quality of sleep was reported in 62% of parents who were co-sleeping with their children.

Moreover, children with epilepsy had greater sleep disturbance, including awakening at night, daytime sleepiness, and bedtime resistance. Parents of children with epilepsy were also found to have increased sleep dysfunction and greater fatigue. In fact, 69% of parents felt concerned about night seizures and 44% reported feeling "rarely" or "never" rested. Results indicate that nighttime seizures were associated with parental sleep issues, while room sharing and co-sleeping were linked with child sleep problems.

Dr. Thiele concludes, "Our study demonstrates the profound impact of epilepsy on child and parent sleep patterns. The findings highlight the need for improved therapies for epilepsy and innovative nocturnal seizure monitoring technologies."

###

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact healthnews@wiley.com.

Full citation:"Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy on Sleep Patterns and Behaviors in Children and Parents." Anna M. Larson, Robin C.C. Ryther, Melanie Jennesson, Alexandra L. Geffrey, Patricia L. Bruno, Christina J. Anagnos, Ali H. Shoeb, Ronald L. Thibert, Elizabeth A. Thiele. Epilepsia; May 17, 2012 (DOI:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2012.03515.x).

URL upon publication: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2012.03515.x

Author Contact: To arrange an interview with Dr. Thiele, please contact Kory Dodd with Massachusetts General Hospital at kdodd1@partners.org or at 617-726-0274.

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) is the world's preeminent association of physicians and health professionals working toward a world where no person's life is limited by epilepsy. Since 1909 the ILAE has provided educational and research resources that are essential in understanding, diagnosing and treating persons with epilepsy. The ILAE supports health professionals, patients, and their care providers, governments, and the general public worldwide by advancing knowledge of epilepsy.

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or our new online platform, Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), one of the world's most extensive multidisciplinary collections of online resources, covering life, health, social and physical sciences, and humanities.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.