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Speaking of Chemistry: Why we need antibiotics (video)

American Chemical Society

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IMAGE: Antibiotics revolutionized health care in the early 20th century, helping kill bacteria that once killed thousands of people. But bacteria are also constantly outsmarting science, and new strains of antibiotic-resistant... view more

Credit: The American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, Sept. 23, 2014 -- Antibiotics revolutionized health care in the early 20th century, helping kill bacteria that once killed thousands of people. But bacteria are also constantly outsmarting science, and new strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are popping up more frequently. This week's Speaking of Chemistry focuses on the current shortage of new antibiotics and discusses the prospects for new drugs. The episode also answers the question: Why should you finish your pills if you feel better? Check it out at: http://youtu.be/MAoDuSxXIUQ.

Antibiotics are just one kind of medicine that chemistry makes possible. Want to learn about cutting-edge drug discovery? Attend a FREE conference -- online -- from C&EN. Watch live on September 24, or see archived talks during all of 2014. Sign up at http://cenm.ag/symposium

Speaking of Chemistry is a production of Chemical & Engineering News, a weekly magazine of the American Chemical Society. The program features fascinating, weird and otherwise interesting chemistry topics. Subscribe to the series at http://youtube.com/CENOnline and follow us on @CENmag.

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The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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