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Satellite sees Tropical Depression 16-E remnants scooped by Hurricane Odile

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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IMAGE: At 9:45 a.m. EDT on Sept. 15, the remnants of TD16-E were being absorbed into Hurricane Odile near the western coast of Mexico. The clouds associated with the remnants were... view more

Credit: Image Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

At 11 p.m. EDT on Sunday, September 14, Tropical Depression 16-E was officially a remnant low pressure area. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the clouds associated with the remnants being drawn into the massive circulation of nearby Hurricane Odile.

At 5 a.m. on Sunday, September 14, Tropical Depression 16-E (TD 16-E) was still holding together despite being close to the circulation of Hurricane Odile. At that time, the center of tropical depression 16-E was located near latitude 14.9 north and longitude 115.3 west. That's about 655 miles (1,055 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The depression was moving toward the east near 12 mph (19 kph). Maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph).

By 11 p.m. that night, the remnant low pressure area was located near 16.3 north latitude and 112.3 west longitude, about 480 miles (775 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Its maximum sustained winds were still near 35 mph (55 kph), but were waning. It was moving to the east-northeast at 13 mph (20 kph).

The National Hurricane Center noted that "satellite imagery suggests that the tropical depression no longer has a well-defined closed surface circulation."

By 9:45 a.m. EDT on September 15, the remnants of TD16-E were being absorbed into Hurricane Odile, which was located near the western coast of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the clouds associated with the remnants wrapping into southwestern side of Odile. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. In the image, the remnants appeared as a small shapeless area of clouds being drawn into the larger counter-clockwise circulation of the hurricane.

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Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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