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NASA sees Tropical Storm Nuri resemble a frontal system

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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IMAGE: NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nuri on Nov. 6 and captured an infrared picture of the storm. Nuri looked more like a frontal system stretching from northeast to... view more

Credit: Image Credit: NASA/NRL

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nuri on Nov. at captured an infrared picture of the storm. The storm looked more like a frontal system as it stretched from northeast to southwest.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite flew over Nuri on Nov. 6 at 1240 UTC (7:40 a.m. EST). The MODIS image showed some strong thunderstorms remaining in a small area around Nuri's center, but the storm appeared stretched out from northeast to southwest. Wind shear was affecting the storm, stretching it out.

The last bulletin on the storm was issued on Nov. 6 at 0300 UTC (Nov. 5 at 10 p.m. EST). At that time, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted that Nuri still had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph). It was located about 130 nautical miles (149 miles/240 km) west-northwest of Chichi-jima, near 29.2 north latitude and 141.0 east longitude. Nuri was moving to the northeast and over open waters of the western North Pacific.

In its final bulletin, JWTC noted that Nuri will become an extra-tropical storm before the end of the day on Nov. 6. Computer models indicate the system will be a strong extra-tropical low pressure area as it continues to move over open waters.

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Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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