Public Release: 

Leading nursing journal finds mothers and babies benefit from skin-to-skin contact

Skin-to-skin contact supports breastfeeding, bonding and better health outcomes

Wiley

Research during the past 30 years has found many benefits of skin-to-skin contact between mothers and newborns immediately after birth, particularly with aiding breastfeeding. However, in some hospitals, skin-to-skin contact following cesarean birth is not implemented, due to practices around the surgery. A recent Quality Improvement (QI) project demonstrated that women's birth experiences were improved by implementing skin-to-skin contact after cesarean surgery.

Women who give birth by cesarean often have more difficulty with breastfeeding, and skin-to-skin contact can make breastfeeding easier by relaxing the mother and baby, enhancing their bond, and helping the baby to latch better. Additional potential benefits of skin-to-skin contact for infants include less cold stress, longer periods of sleep, improved weight gain, better brain development, a reduction in "purposeless" activity, decreased crying, longer periods of alertness, and earlier hospital discharge.

In "A Quality Improvement Project Focused on Women's Perceptions of Skin-to-Skin Contact After Cesarean Birth", Judith Ann Moran-Peters, RN, NE-BC, BC, and her coauthors write about a QI project to implement skin-to-skin contact following cesarean birth and to measure women's perceptions in contrast with previous cesarean births without immediate skin-to-skin contact. This article appears in the August/September 2014 issue of Nursing for Women's Health, the clinical practice journal of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN).

"Nurses working in labor and birth settings should promote the practice of skin-to-skin contact between women and their newborn infants immediately following birth, given the significant health benefits associated with this experience," write the authors. "The moments right after birth represent the ideal timeframe for initiating breastfeeding, which generates important health benefits for the baby."

The authors advise that while there may be several challenges in implementing a protocol for skin-to-skin contact following a cesarean birth, a collaborative group of clinicians can identify and eliminate these barriers. One example is newborns not joining their mothers in a regular room until a significant amount of time has passed after birth. Additional barriers faced by women who have cesarean surgery include sterile draping from the surgery and mental fatigue from pain and sedation medications. The positive benefits of skin-to-skin contact for newborns and moms call for action to be taken by healthcare providers to minimize barriers and make skin-to-skin contact a priority.

"Nurses can help identify and eliminate barriers to skin-to-skin contact following cesarean surgery and raise this as a priority for improvement," said AWHONN's CEO, Lynn Erdman, MN, RN, FAAN. "The health benefits of skin-to-skin contact along with breastfeeding are well understood, so expanding this practice to cesarean births is a natural improvement for practice and patient health."

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About Nursing for Women's Health

Nursing for Women's Health is a bimonthly refereed clinical practice journal of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. The journal circulates to more than 25,000 nurses who care for women and newborns and is available online at http://nwh.awhonn.org.

About AWHONN

The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) is the foremost nursing authority that advances the health care of women and newborns through advocacy, research and the creation of high quality, evidence-based standards of care. AWHONN strives to represent the interests of 350,000 registered nurses working in women's health, obstetric and neonatal nursing nationwide.

AWHONN's 24,000 members worldwide are clinicians, educators and executives who serve as patient care advocates focusing on the needs of women and infants. A leader in professional development, AWHONN holds the distinction of receiving the Premier Program award by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) for innovation and excellence in Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) three times.

Founded in 1969 as the Nurses Association of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the association became a separate nonprofit organization called the Association of Women's Health and Neonatal Nurses in 1993. Visit AWHONN on Facebook.

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