Public Release: 

Expected stay rates of US and foreign doctoral graduates diverge with time

Numbers are important for policymakers and researchers

National Science Foundation

A new National Science Foundation (NSF) report reveals the number of U.S. citizen doctoral graduates in science, engineering and health fields, who remain in the United States, tracks closely with their intent to stay in the United States at the time of graduation. However, there are noticeable differences for doctoral graduates who were temporary visa holders at the time of graduation.

According to the report, 96.4 percent of U.S. citizen doctoral graduates from academic years 2001-09 reported their intent to live in the United States, a measure referred to as the expected stay rate. In 2010, 96.2 percent--the actual stay rate--were still living in the United States.

Among doctoral graduates who were temporary visa holders, 76.4 percent reported their intention to stay in the United States. However, the actual and expected stay rates diverge as time since graduation increases. By 2010, only 68.5 percent of graduates with a temporary visa remained in the United States.

The data presented in this report are important for policymakers and researchers who are interested in understanding the factors influencing the employment decisions of doctoral degree holders.

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See more from this report: Employment Decisions of U.S. and Foreign Doctoral Graduates: A Comparative Study.

For more information and statistical products, please visit NSF's National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics.

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