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Trust through the olfactory fragrance of lavender



Sellaro and her fellow researchers were the first to investigate whether the calming olfactory fragrance of lavender has a positive effect on mutual trust. Aromatherapists already known that aromatic compounds can alter one's mood, cognitive, psychological or physical wellbeing. "Mutual trust is the social glue of society", says Sellaro. "Interpersonal trust is an essential element for social co-operation bargaining and negotiation."

Trust Game

To determine the effect of fragrances, the researchers exposed one group of test persons to the aroma of lavender, while a second group to the aroma of peppermint. Subsequently, the test persons played a trust game, a task that is often used to measure how much one test person trusts the other. A trustor was given 5 euros and was free to decide how much of that money he would give to a trustee in each round of the game. The trustor would then receive extra money, but only if the trustee gave him enough money in return. The money transferred to the trustee by the trustor served as an indicator of mutual trust.

Inexpensive way to increase trust

Test persons gave significantly more money to the other person when they were exposed to the aroma of lavender, compared to persons who had been exposed to the fragrance of peppermint.

Sellaro: "Our results might have various serious implications for a broad range of situations in which interpersonal trust is an essential element. Smelling the aroma of lavender may help a seller to establish more easily a trusting negotiation to sell a car, or in a grocery store it may induce consumers to spend more money buying products. The smell of lavender may also be helpful in sport psychology to enhance trust and build team spirit, for example in the case of team games such as soccer and volleyball."


1. Article title: A question of scent: lavender aroma promotes interpersonal trust
Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01486
Authors: Roberta Sellaro, Wilco W. van Dijk, Claudia Rossi Paccani, Bernhard Hommel and Lorenza S. Colzato

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2. Researcher contacts

Roberta Sellaro

Lorenza Colzato

3. About Frontiers

Frontiers is a leading community-driven open-access publisher. Established by scientists in 2007, Frontiers drives innovations in peer review, post-publication review, impact metrics for articles and authors, democratic evaluation of the best research papers, research networking and a growing ecosystem of open-science tools. The "Frontiers in" journal series has published 25,000 peer-reviewed articles across 51 journals and more than 380 academic disciplines, which receive 6 million monthly views, and are supported by over 170,000 leading researchers worldwide. Frontiers for Young Minds, a philanthropic initiative by Frontiers, is a science journal that involves young people in the review of articles. In 2014, Frontiers won the ALPSP Gold Award for Innovation in Publishing. For more information, visit

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