Public Release: 

Quantum research past, present and future for discussion at AAAS

University of Waterloo

A panel of quantum experts from three world-leading institutes will share their insights on quantum research, from its beginnings to its exciting future, in a moderated discussion at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Professor Raymond Laflamme, executive director of the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo will appear with Artur Ekert, director of the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the University of Singapore, and Andrew Briggs, director of the Quantum Information Processing Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (QIP IRC) at the University of Oxford. Kate Lunau, a health and science journalist with Maclean's Magazine, will moderate the discussion.

Transformational Opportunities of Quantum Information Technologies

WHEN: Saturday, February 14, 2015, 3:00 to 4:30 p.m. PST
WHERE: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting, Room 210CD San Jose Convention Center, 150 West San Carlos Street, San Jose, California.

"At our institutes, as well as others around the world, we are developing prototype quantum computers and quantum sensors that already surpass their classical counterparts," said Laflamme, also a professor with the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Waterloo's Faculty of Science. "We will discuss the path that quantum information has taken and how it will transform the world as we know it."

Professor Ekert will share the origins of the field, followed by Professor Briggs on the achievements already being used today. Laflamme will round out the panel with long-term predictions for where the field will take us.

Quantum mechanics allows us to manipulate and process information in a fundamentally different way. Harnessing quantum mechanics will transform information technology in the near future. There is a global race to build a universal quantum computer allowing us to solve today's intractable programs. Other technologies will also be transformed from ultra-secure communications to highly accurate and efficient sensors.

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