Public Release: 

Electron Photon Science Center announces joint research division with Clean Planet

Tohoku University

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Credit: Research Center for Electron Photon Science, Tohoku University

Through this new joint research collaboration, researchers will obtain basic data on nuclear reaction in anomalous heat generation phenomena, as well as in nuclear transmutation phenomena. This is to better understand ultra-low-energy nuclear reactions in condensed matter. They will also work on application development research aimed at commercializing new clean energy.

The Research Center for Electron Photon Science and Clean Planet Inc. hope to bring major changes to Japan's energy industry, through the conceptual change of conventional nuclear reaction and the development of clean and safe energy generation technology.

1. Condensed Matter Nuclear Reaction (CMNR)

"Condensed Matter Nuclear Reaction" means ultra-low-energy nuclear reaction observed in a condensed matter arising from "Cold Fusion". First published in 1989, research in this field has been going on under various names, such as "Nuclear Reaction in Solid," "Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR)" and "Chemically Assisted Nuclear Reaction (CANR)". Condensed Matter means a solid or liquid state where atoms and electrons are highly condensed. CMNR refers to the nuclear reaction phenomenon in the state of condensed atoms and electrons.

Although research on this exists in many countries, the phenomena cannot yet be explained theoretically. Through our new joint division, research and development will be performed to get basic data of the phenomena with the eventual aim of finding a theoretical explanation.

If the phenomena is proved to be due to an unknown nuclear reaction, it will overthrow traditional nuclear theory.

The joint research division will carry out research and development for at least four years. If successful, it hopes to enhance the basic data of the CMNR, deepen the understanding of the CMNR mechanism, and develop new technology for clean energy and innovative radioactive waste processing.

2. Background and Objective

Stemming from the "Cold Fusion" report of 1989, ultra-low-energy nuclear reactions in condensed matter (CMNR) has been studied for more than 25 years. But, with the exception of the interpretation of the anomalous excess heat generation phenomenon and the transmutation phenomenon, there is still poor experimental evidence for nuclear reaction occurrence.

There is great global interest in this research because results could revolutionize the concept of conventional nuclear reaction and increase the possibility of clean nuclear energy.

At the latest international conference on Condensed Matter Nuclear Science, held at the University of Missouri in July 2013, companies that promote and develop heat output devices accounted for more than 40% of the participants.

Industry interest in alternative energy is strong and the Condensed Matter Nuclear Reaction Research Division is founded to promote and encourage industry-university cooperation.

Tohoku University is the first university in Japan to have a special division for CMNR

3 Research plan:

Researchers of Tohoku University and Clean Planet Inc. will participate in this joint research division. The research plan is:

    1) Improve the reliability of the nuclide identification in the CMNR products
    2) Accurate measurement of radiation generated at the time of the CMNR progress
    3) Search for enhancing methods of the reaction rate of the CMNR
    4) Confirmation of radioactivity reduction of radioactive elements by the CMNR
    5) Development of the origin and energy availability of heat generation by the CMNR.

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Contact:

Jirohta Kasagi (Research Professor)
Research Center for Electron Photon Science, Tohoku University
Tel: 022-743-3414, Email: kasagi@lns.tohoku.ac.jp

Masanao Hattori
Clean Planet Inc.
Tel: 03-5403-6380, Email: hattori@cleanplanet.co.jp?

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